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Old 02-09-2010
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Setting a trip line to an anchor

I do a bit of cruising around the Med and tie up stern to the quay. Occasionally the ground is foul and the anchor can get caught. It seems like a trip line secured to the crown of the anchor might be the answer. I can see that this is secured one end to the crown and the other to a buoy which will go straight up from the anchor. What I want to know is do you then have a line from the buoy to the boat or is the idea to ease forward to the buoy after releasing the stern lines and then pull on the trip? If it's connected to the boat and you pull the buoy on board and then pull the trip will it free the anchor without having left the quay? It's just that it seems to me that the angle that you're pulling the anchor won't be as effective if you do it this way

Some help on this would be appreciated

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Old 02-09-2010
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an anchor trip line works just as you described, a line is attached to the crown of the anchor (most fluke or plow type anchors usually have a hole pre drilled for this - this hole doubles as an attachment for a pin through or safety line while the anchor is in its chocks or roller). The other end of the line is buoyed.

If I set a trip line, I winch, or motor up to the anchor. If the anchor is dug in so well that a vertical pull does not dislodge it, a pull on the trip line should give the anchor a tug in a reverse direction of when it went in, thus unhooking it.
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Old 02-09-2010
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You're supposed to move the boat up to the anchor buoy and pull the anchor up vertically using the trip line.
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Old 02-09-2010
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Whenever I've seen an anchor setup with a trip, the anchor is attached to the rode at the crown, and then the rode is attached a second time to the end of the shank with wire. The idea being if the anchor won't budge, you pull hard enough to break the wire, which means you are pulling the anchor from the crown.

Seems to me if you had 2 lines you'd be untangling them a lot.
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Not a great idea, since in a storm or with reversing current/wind, you might end up breaking the wire and tripping the anchor prematurely.

It is a lot like the "rock slot" found on the Manson Supreme Anchor's shank.

My question to my friend who thought it was a great idea was: "How does the anchor tell whether you've pulled the rode forward to free the anchor or whether the storm has pulled the rode forward because the wind has shifted?"

My response was, "It doesn't... in one case the anchor comes out...in the other the anchor comes out and you lose your boat." The look on his face was pretty priceless...and he doesn't own the Manson Supreme any more...


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Originally Posted by n0w0rries View Post
Whenever I've seen an anchor setup with a trip, the anchor is attached to the rode at the crown, and then the rode is attached a second time to the end of the shank with wire. The idea being if the anchor won't budge, you pull hard enough to break the wire, which means you are pulling the anchor from the crown.

Seems to me if you had 2 lines you'd be untangling them a lot.
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Old 02-09-2010
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While I understand that trip lines have their place, please do not use them more often than necessary. They can cause problems for you and for other boaters in the area.

If you swing around in a few circles in the night but there isn't enough wind to cause the anchor to reset, you will have wrapped up your trip line with your anchor rode which can trip the anchor when you really don't want to. I have seen this happen and boats end up on the beach from it.

The other problem is putting a ball in the way of other boaters. Many anchorages are very tight and you take up much more room with a trip line. I have seen several problems resulting from wind shifts where another boat gets hung up on the trip line which can wrap the prop or cause the anchor to trip out. This isn't an issue with a med moor but you will be putting a buoy right in the middle of the channel where other vessels are trying to turn and start backing in.

If you are in a place with a foul bottom, using a trip line does make sense. You described it properly in your original post with a separate buoy on the surface that you motor up to. Sorry to rant about the use of trip lines but I have seen more problems come out of them than they solved so knowing when to use one is key.
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Old 02-09-2010
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Klem,

Funny. That is the second one of your posts I agree with completely. Especially down here they can be hazardous. I will also tell you that the only time I could not get my anchor up (and it had a trip), I snapped off the trip trying to get it to break free. Goodbye anchor. I suspect that if your anchor is embedded so tightly that you cannot motor it off vertically, the thought that a flimsy little trip line is going to get it up is wishful thinking.

If you are in a crowded anchorage, they are more trouble than they are worth. In fact, I am not sure when they are not more trouble than they are worth. I think seamanship might call for a second achor as a backup instead of a trip... but this is just my opinion. I am not a fan of them.

Brian


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While I understand that trip lines have their place, please do not use them more often than necessary. They can cause problems for you and for other boaters in the area.

If you swing around in a few circles in the night but there isn't enough wind to cause the anchor to reset, you will have wrapped up your trip line with your anchor rode which can trip the anchor when you really don't want to. I have seen this happen and boats end up on the beach from it.

The other problem is putting a ball in the way of other boaters. Many anchorages are very tight and you take up much more room with a trip line. I have seen several problems resulting from wind shifts where another boat gets hung up on the trip line which can wrap the prop or cause the anchor to trip out. This isn't an issue with a med moor but you will be putting a buoy right in the middle of the channel where other vessels are trying to turn and start backing in.

If you are in a place with a foul bottom, using a trip line does make sense. You described it properly in your original post with a separate buoy on the surface that you motor up to. Sorry to rant about the use of trip lines but I have seen more problems come out of them than they solved so knowing when to use one is key.
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That's all been a great help thanks. The other problem I'm a bit worried about is that this year I am taking my family (and another family) to Greece and there are one or two very tight harbours where foul and crossed lines are commonplace. Because my crew won't be very experienced it will be down to me to a) avoid any such fouling or crossing and b) get us out of it if it does happen. It's likely to be someone fouling my line in any event. Has anyone got any suggestions about how I might avoid this (other than not going into such places) and/or how I might free myself without having to dive down to the bottom or by losing my anchor and without causing any damage to my or other boats? Would setting a trip line help avoid and then help resolve this?

Thanks
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Never saw so many anchor bouys that they were a problem. I've found it very handy to know where their anchor is. It gives me an idea of their scope and swing. If the anchorage is so tight that all boats must swing in unision then I move on. I'm not that good a sailor, or neighbour, so maybe I just never find myself in those anchorages. Or maybe I just do not use a bouy when it might get run over so it just seems like it is not a problem.


The main problem I see is not anchor bouys, but crab pots. They can be everywhere.

Anchor bouys seem to be a good idea. Clearly the line used should be more than just a string, unless you plan to dive down to get the anchor.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipper52 View Post
That's all been a great help thanks. The other problem I'm a bit worried about is that this year I am taking my family (and another family) to Greece and there are one or two very tight harbours where foul and crossed lines are commonplace. Because my crew won't be very experienced it will be down to me to a) avoid any such fouling or crossing and b) get us out of it if it does happen. It's likely to be someone fouling my line in any event. Has anyone got any suggestions about how I might avoid this (other than not going into such places) and/or how I might free myself without having to dive down to the bottom or by losing my anchor and without causing any damage to my or other boats? Would setting a trip line help avoid and then help resolve this?

Thanks
Contrary to what others have said about the hazzards of setting a trip line in a crowded anchorage, I prefer seeing anchors bouyed so I know precisely where other anchors are set. I also like using all chain just in case someone hangs up on the rode. The trip line on the anchor should be almost vertical and not represent a hazzard to other boats. Just make sure that there is enough length to factor in tides.
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