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post #1 of 7 Old 02-22-2010 Thread Starter
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Bow Rollers

If a boat has some sort of windlass (particularly motorized), is a bow roller still necessary, or at least the retention pin? It seems counter-productive for those with windlass controls in the cockpit.

And as for windlasses, does the chain portion between the rode and anchor wrap up around it as well? Surely not. It sounds typical to have anywhere from 50 to 100' or more of chain, plus another 100 to 200' of rode. Seems like one would need a windlass with a huge drum to reel all that up.
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-22-2010
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Bow roller: if you lacked a bow roller, what would be the point at which the rode went from going sideways from the windlass, to downward into the water? You don't want it to just hang out over the gunwales Windlasses are usually mounted on the deck, you know.

I don't have a windlass, but I understand that at least some of them have a chain portion (toothy) and a rope portion (smooth like a winch drum). I'm not sure how you make sure that it switches from one to the other appropriately. It may require that you go forward.

Very little of the rode stays on the drum. Just as with winch drums, the tail of the line goes someplace else and only a few coils stay on the drum at the time. In the case of the windlass, the rode and chain should be redirected to a locker somewhere belowdecks.

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post #3 of 7 Old 02-22-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkscout View Post
If a boat has some sort of windlass (particularly motorized), is a bow roller still necessary, or at least the retention pin? It seems counter-productive for those with windlass controls in the cockpit.
A bow roller is kind of a necessity if you have a windlass. The anchor and the rode have to be stowed somehow when sailing around the harbor. The easiest way is to have a bow roller... Don't generally recommend pinning the anchor to the bow roller. If the anchor gets hit by a large wave, the pin could get bent and prevent you from being able to deploy the anchor. The anchor, especially if it is a rollbar design like the Rocna, should be lashed into position. In an emergency, the lashing can be quickly cut to free the anchor.

Remember, that the anchor is an important piece of safety gear. If you run into trouble with the boat, you can often anchor to give yourself some time to sort things out.

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And as for windlasses, does the chain portion between the rode and anchor wrap up around it as well? Surely not. It sounds typical to have anywhere from 50 to 100' or more of chain, plus another 100 to 200' of rode. Seems like one would need a windlass with a huge drum to reel all that up.
The chain is part of the rode. The anchor rode consists of everything between the anchor and the boat....the anchor shackle, the chain, and the nylon rope. The windlass doesn't store the rode around a spool or drum. You're thinking of the winch off of a jeep or something like that... which isn't the case here. The windlass is used to retrieve the anchor and pulls the rode in, but the rode itself is actually stowed in the anchor or chain locker, usually through a chainpipe of some sort. See the following image:


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Last edited by sailingdog; 02-22-2010 at 12:49 PM.
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post #4 of 7 Old 02-22-2010
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Bow roller

Not to hijack this thread, but how do you know which bow roller to buy. I've been considering one, but Im not sure which one to get. I'm sure that SD has a formula, so lets hear it.

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Depends on the configuration of the bow of your boat, as well as what anchor you're planning on putting on the roller.

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Not to hijack this thread, but how do you know which bow roller to buy. I've been considering one, but Im not sure which one to get. I'm sure that SD has a formula, so lets hear it.

Dave

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post #6 of 7 Old 02-22-2010 Thread Starter
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Very Nice explanation. From the drawing I guess I was mistaking the gypsy to function as a drum would on a winch. So, it looks like the windlass assy. "holds on" to the rode and retrieves it/pulls it up and, in the example of your illustration, feeds it into the locker.

Okay, so what's the gypsy's function? For wrapping short amount of rode?

I guess I'm trying to equate the setup to those found on large ships, and I was under the impression there were styles? to allow the task to be performed entirely from a remote location, specifically the cockpit (for anchorages under calm conditions).
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The gypsy on most modern windlasses will handle both rope and chain. For instance, the windlass on my boat has a gypsy that is designed to handle 5/16" G43 high-test chain and 9/16" or 5/8" nylon rope. The chain size is very specific to the windlass gypsy, and putting the wrong size chain on the gypsy can damage it..

The capstan, or drum, which projects above the gypsy on some windlasses, like mine, is used for hauling in an all rope anchor rode. If the windlass is a vertical design, like that in the drawing I posted, the drum can also be used to haul up a dinghy via a block and tackle or halyard led to a snatch block.

Vertical windlasses, however, require a deeper chain locker for the anchor rode to fall properly. They tend to be a bit more secure in holding the rode, since they take a 180˚ wrap on the gypsy, rather than the 90˚ found on a horizontal windlass. They’re a bit more useful, as the capstan can be used for things other than an anchor rode as mentioned above.

A horizontal windlass is often a better choice for a boat with two anchors and two bow rollers, since many horizontal windlasses have the gypsy on one side and the capstan on the other. They require less distance for the rode to fall into the chain locker, since the rode only wraps 90˚ and is dropping off the gypsy or capstan into the chain pipe. Here is a lighthouse horizontal windlass:



Either horizontal or vertical windlasses can be operated remotely if they are properly setup and equipped with a bow roller that pivots and self-launches. To set the anchor, you would free it—undoing any lashings or pins that secure the anchor while underway. Then you would either let the gypsy freefall or let out some rode. This would allow the bow roller to pivot under the weight of the anchor and self-launch the anchor. I prefer to control the rode feeding out rather than let it freefall, since it is far less likely to end up in a pile on top of the anchor and possibly foul the anchor and prevent it from setting. As the anchor is dropping towards the bottom, you would allow the wind to push the boat backwards a bit....until you have enough rode out to set the anchor. Many anchors can be set at 5:1 scope, but you would be wise to let out 7:1 or 8:1 scope if conditions are going to be rougher....

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Last edited by sailingdog; 02-23-2010 at 12:12 AM.
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