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Old 04-07-2010
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Boat Ramp Jacksonville,FL

I am a student at Jacksonville University. I bought my first keel boat a Cal 24 Mark III in November of last year. I used the University's ramp to launch the boat, now its the end of the year and i need to recover the boat to take it to my hometown Charleston, Sc . The ramp at the university is too steep (60 degree down angle) to attempt to recover my boat. Curious if any of the experts here know of a ramp in Jacksonville that is well suited for recovering a fin keeled sailboat.

Cal 24 mark III
Draft 4ft 3inches
trailer is tandem axle
has tongue extension

Thanks
Nick
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Old 04-07-2010
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There's probably a knowledgeable person with the City of Jacksonville Parks Dept. that could tell you, but good luck finding him or her. You could also try the Florida Marine Patrol (FWC). Those guys know almost everything.
But I think you're missing a bet. Get a buddy to deliver your trailer and sail her up. It would be a great trip.
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Old 04-07-2010
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You could also have a marina travelift pick the boat up and place it on the trailer.
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Old 04-07-2010
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I am saving the travel lift idea as a last resort. I bought the boat with the idea that i could operate it off of a ramp. I have sense realized that its easier said than done. As a college student i cant afford to keep paying someone else haul out the boat. I will probably just sell the boat and start saving up for what i really want, one of those trailerable trimarans.
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Old 04-07-2010
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Why not winch it? You would only need something that could winch 4000lbs up a 30 degree slope. I am guessing that the angle of inclination is 30 degrees, right? If the angle of inclination is sixty degrees that ramp is insane!

Even the cheapest warn winch could handle it easily at 9000 lbs pull. I mean, you should just sail the boat to SC, and pick it up on the travel lift. Might be easier than finding someone with a truck and futzing around at the ramp.
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Old 04-07-2010
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The winch might be able to handle it... but is there a point on the boat that can handle that load???

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Originally Posted by tager View Post
Why not winch it? You would only need something that could winch 4000lbs up a 30 degree slope. I am guessing that the angle of inclination is 30 degrees, right? If the angle of inclination is sixty degrees that ramp is insane!

Even the cheapest warn winch could handle it easily at 9000 lbs pull. I mean, you should just sail the boat to SC, and pick it up on the travel lift. Might be easier than finding someone with a truck and futzing around at the ramp.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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Old 04-07-2010
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not winch the boat, winch the trailer up the ramp with the boat on it, that's what they do up here, Maine, with the big guys, the truck stays on top of the ramp and the trailer gets winched down and up. you just need to add a front wheel to the trailer, and some wieght to the tounge to be safe. and go slow.
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Old 04-07-2010
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I live in Jacksonville. The Mayport ramp is probably perfect for you. Good depth, steep, but not too steep. The only challenge is that the current can be a doozy. I would recommend planning on loading at the turn of the tide. The other option is Sister's Creek on the ICW just north of the St.Johns River.

Good luck!

Don
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Old 04-08-2010
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There is a third wheel on the tongue. The extension i have is similar to the boom they use to tow aircraft.

Thanks Don for recommendations ill check those out latter this week.
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Old 04-08-2010
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I recover my San Juan 7.7 with 60 feet of rope attached between my truck and the trailer.
Simply, I back down the ramp to near the water, chock the trailer detach it from the truck and tie the rope between the trailer tongue and the truck frame. I then attach the third wheel near the yolk of the trailer to give me a stable platform. I the pull the truck forward until the line is taught, un-chock the trailer and then back my "60 foot long trailer" into the water to a depth where I can float the boat onto the trailer.
From there, I snug up to the front of the trailer with ropes and pulleys. Once secure, we pull the 60 foot trailer back to just out of the water, re-chock, remove the third wheel, untie the rope and hook up directly to the hitch.
The third wheel is essential as the "60 foot long trailer" must go straight into and out of the water without a hitch turning axis.

Last edited by FlyNavy; 04-08-2010 at 02:07 PM. Reason: additional details
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