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  #11  
Old 04-20-2010
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Thanks a lot for the replies I appreciate it. Here is the fixed link. I just think its a great looking boat inside and out.

1979 Morgan North American Sail New and Used Boats for Sale -

It has a great winch inventory and good sails for racing, but there are no heavy smaller jibs or storm sails and I am not sure about reefs in the main. Photo 3 shows black spots on the main at the mast which may be reefing points?

2-Asymetrical spinnakers.
1-Dacron light 150% Genoa.
1-Dacron mail sail.
1-Kevlar medium 145% Genoa.
1-Kevlar medium 140% Genoa.
1-Kevlar light 140% Genoa.
1-Ullman composite light weight main sail.
Spinnaker pole.
2-Main sail covers - one tan, one blue.

Last edited by Dennisail; 04-20-2010 at 07:36 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-20-2010
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Mainsail reefs

Thanks for the updated link.
That mainsail has one reef. Nice looking condition of the interior and the engine.
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  #13  
Old 04-20-2010
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Yeah I am drawn to that interior and the engine looks good. Cruising speed of 7K with max of 10K is impressive too.
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  #14  
Old 04-20-2010
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Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Ha!! How funny! I was looking a the same boat (not to buy).

I will give you my worthless opinions. Be aware, that most of my opinions are based on live aboard and with kids, as I have known no other. With that in mind...

1) You would be amazed at the crap people sail offshore. I sometimes wonder if someone with half a brain desinged half of them. Now take a boat that has at least been through some real care over the years, as this one has, and I bet you could circle a thousand times. Sorry - I had to say that to start off with. I see some people pulling in around me and I just shake my head and realize that boats are tougher than people put them out to be on most of these boards!!!

2) The tankage on that boat sucks. That was mentioned before. As a live aboard and cruiser, we freaking motor all the time - and I have a relatively fast boat!!! On an ocean passage, I am sure you would get across on that tankage if you follow Slokum's lead... but I feel that most of use are not that tough anymore. Maybe you are and can piss fresh water, but not us! I'm just saying that I would really modify that.

3) I am not picking on anyone, but I would never, ever put gerry cans top side for a long passage. First good wave and they are gone. This is not hear-say, this is real life personal experience from a nice little gale(s) offshore. Plus, the water you will take overboard, assuming any cans survive, will ineveitably try and make it into the spouts making it tough to keep the fuel and water clean. I have subsequently made every effort to keep any gerry cans out of the elements and protected. Trust me or learn for yourself.

4) I have been racing on a smaller Morgan and they are actually a nice performing boat. Fun to race and I think the PHRF ratings may be a little liberal. However, the comment about them sucking and broaching down wind has been our experience too while racing. Not sure about cruising, and this was on a smaller boat. Incidentally, we beat out S2's, Melges, and several other much faster boats on the Morgan... fun boat to sail and way under rated. But when cruising, a broach mught be a disaster. I prefer something fast and sure footed. The morgan we were on can tend to be a bit tender.

5) If the boat touches you, go for it. I imagine she could be modified to meet your needs. The comment about not using a roller furling might be true, but I would not go to sea without one. SHe has been a saving grace for us, espcially since I have to single most of the time. I simply cannot imagine going forward in a gale offshore at night and trying to drop/change a Jib by myself. Those decks get very slippery at night and you cannot judge teh waves and when to hold on. Again, this is first hand experience. And even most of the junkers I see pulling in have roller furlings... with one very good sailor and a notable exception - but that is a different story as he was a better sailor than I.

6) 50k! Wow! Seems cheap to me. But I know nothing about his engine make. Get a goood engine survey or plan to replace.

Anyways, I am not repsonding here to counter anyone else claims. There appears to be some first hand knowledge on this board about that boat, maybe even offshore. My basic feeling is that if you like the boat, modify the tankage and change the engine and runnign rig to meet your needs. If you are unsure about her, keep looking for something more designed for that role you wish to take. She is a pretty boat, but would not be my first choice of boats to cross the pacific. I would opt for a Tayana 37 if I wanted to keep it under 100k. Heck, in todays market, you might get a real steal on one. SHe won't win any races (except in corrected time), but she will get you to the horizon in safety... eventually.

Just my opinions at a glance. Fair winds and have fun with it! Keep us posted!!!

Brian
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  #15  
Old 04-20-2010
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Here you go...

Imagine going forward to drop and lash the head sail in this:



Remember, pictures flatten out waves. But you are looking down the bow of a 40-43 foot boat that is facing the wall of another swell. We were taking breakers onto the bimini! Forget the bow.. that happends all the time. I mean taking breakers on the bimini. That is sea water dripping from it, not rain. How would you like to go forward in that and drop your headsail? It could be done, but if you go overboard in those seas, you are dead. Period. You will not die immediately, but you cannot turn the boat around fast enough and you cannot see crap. When night fell, everything really goes dark and you are just along for the ride, for better or worse. That is why I am such a big proponent of minimizing things on deck that require attention or can become problems. I have dealt with both at night in a gale and UGH! It is no fun.

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Last edited by Cruisingdad; 04-20-2010 at 09:19 PM.
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  #16  
Old 04-20-2010
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A properly designed reefing headsail should perform well regardless of if it is full or reefed. We reef our headsail often since it is a masthead rig and the wind conditions here are variable from light to 30+ kts. The roller furling designs have improved and they are capable of running the sail in a reefed configuration without problems. The instructions for my Harken furler specifically says do not use a winch to furl or reef; and while it is a hard tug when the wind is up we never have had trouble reefing or furling a 400 sq ft heavy dacron headsail.

I would much sooner use a roller reefing system with the option of dropping the headsail to change size than constantly need to go forward to drop/unrig/rig new/hoist/stow for the varying conditions and potentially in heavy wind and seas; especially if shorthanded.

A trip from the US to OZ is mostly if not all downwind; and of course one would travel during the summer in the nothern hemisphere to avoid the hurricane season while crossing the southern tropics.

Oh; on the issues of tankage, you might consider the following:

Use the 26 gallon tank only for rinsing your dishes and washing hands/body sparingly. Plumb a watermaker to a 5 gallon jug with a spigot for your drinking needs; and a diverter valve over to the 26 gallon tank for topping it up. When you wash dishes use seawater from a seawater tap at the sink with foot pump; then rinse with fresh.

I mentioned putting the jugs up on the rail only as a potential place when the boat is in calm seas and light winds; to open up cockpit space if stowed in the pit. Ideally you would want a storage locker for the jugs or another tank below deck. But on a long passage of several thousand miles; you really are going to have to be patient and wait for wind if you sail into a hole. You can't take enough fuel to motor whenever you are not traveling over 2 kts. Simon never needed his engine except maybe to motor across the doldrums and then when he went into the various ports.

Also; I think Simon used the pactor modem, sailmail, and downloaded grib files for wind data while he was on passage; but not totally sure about that.

I would get some good dacron cruising sails and save those racing sails and spinnakers for when you get back to OZ, Dennis.

Last edited by KeelHaulin; 04-20-2010 at 11:33 PM.
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  #17  
Old 04-20-2010
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ther is nothing wrong with the design and it absolutely does not need
crew on the rail to perform. I would suggest upgrading the rudder to a larger one if that has not been done. This is the only issue and can be remedied
as many have. Also, there is no need to overpower the boat it will
sail fine and be well balanced not have a nasty weather helm like wider transomed boats of later marketing driven design.
the small boom high aspect ratio will be a blessing once you get to use it.
The boat will not need a lot of overlap to perform . I cannot comment on the construction , however the design is good , but have someone who knows what they are doing make suggestions on the rudder. You may not need to replace it , if beefy enough just add to it both depth and breadth . tankage don't worry
there are plenty of ways to carry water.
good looking boat too
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  #18  
Old 04-21-2010
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This boat already has a furler. But I am not sure if it is suitable for reefing. What exactly is the difference? Can one type only be used either fully furled or fully unfurled? Would I be right in saying what this boat has is not suitable for reefing the genoa because of sail and furler type? Also, how do you change a sail when used with a furler? How does the sail track on the rod? I have always changed sails manually as I have never had the luxury of a furler.

I realize tankage is a prob, but that was my least concern. I am sure we could find a way to get more water and fuel aboard much easier and cheaper than other probs such as getting the right sails for the job.

I have been in a gale and had to remove a ripped sail. Here are some pics. The bow was actually going underwater and I had to hang on. We were doing coastal hops up the northern NSW coast (east OZ) and we could not make our next port due to increasing headwinds. (hence I want a boat that will sail into the wind, unlike this piver) The only harbour was crowdy head and we felt safer out at sea in the middle of the shipping lanes dodging dozens of tankers than trying to come into an unknown harbour with no coastguard in rough seas. It was Christmas eve and our diesel motor had died a few days before and our spare outboard would not make progress into any decent sort of wind or waves. We also had one side shroud snap off from the top of the mast due to slack rigging. So we got out on deck and furled the main onto the boom to half mast hight. This was an accomplishment on its own given we had to make our own handle out of scrap metal an took about an hour. We just motor sailed into the wind with a heavily reefed main until day break when the wind lessened and we could see the harbour. We made repairs there and a nice family invited us in for food at Christmas once they figured out we were Columbian drug runners who were reported to use the small out of the way harbour.

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  #19  
Old 04-21-2010
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Just do it...most of your wind will be on the port stern quarter. When sailing dead down wind, (forget it way to uncomfortable) sail a few degrees from dead down wind to stop the boat acting like a squirrel. I had 80 gals of fuel and carried an extra 30, you will only need this extra fuel until the Marquesas as from this point good fuel is available at a price. Water is an issue so fit a good water maker as the only good water is available from Tahiti and major centres west. DO NOT TAKE ON WATER IN THE MARQUESAS.
I tended to rely on the headsail and kept a third reef in the main for most of the trip. Only once did a fly the MPS (that’s another story) if you are short handing forget the spinnaker, if you must fly it, fly it as an mps it will work well. Replace the Radar and chart plotter with quality new stuff in the states, keep the old stuff as back up, you can sell the old stuff when home and get a lot of your expense back.
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  #20  
Old 04-21-2010
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The look shows how I felt after no sleep and a rough night removing the sail. I reckon I could have put a new one up but it would not have been easy.



We felt good when the wind died and the sun came up. Boom roller reefing didn't exactly work with the dodger. I guess that is to be expected when your whole mast, rigging and sails cost $1000 donated from another boat.



Would you exit the heads in this?

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