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  #1  
Old 04-24-2010
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question about jacklines

Hello all

I am planning on installing jacklines on my boat this spring. I have two options;
- On the cabin roof
- on the side decks from front to back.

Perhaps it is silly but my primary concern with installing along the side deck is that the jackline will run along the side the cabin wall. No big deal except that I expect that if I do this the carabiner I will use on my safety webbing will rub along the cabin wall when I move forward and scratch up my paint job.
Am I correct in saying this?
Are there any ways around this or am I worrying about nothing/have my priorities mixed up?

The advantage of running along the side decks is that I can run from front to back, if I run along the cabin roof I will have to clip into a forward jackline and then un-clip from the cabin roof jackline.
It is worth mentioning that I sail a contessa 26 and the side decks are so narrow that they are never used when moving forward, I always climb up on the cabin roof.


John
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Old 04-24-2010
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The jacklines should have the cleanest run. On your boat, use flat webbing from the stern cleats, around the bow under the anchor and bow then back to the stern cleat. Why would you want to clip and unclip?
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Old 04-24-2010
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My primary concern with running the jacklines along the side deck would be that if I fell I might go overboard and not be able to get back on deck. I would run them down the center of a narrow boat like yours. Get a harness with two lines so you are never totally unclipped.
Of course if you want to worry about your paint you can.
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Old 04-24-2010
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I second what FSMike said... especially if you're singlehanding the boat at all. BTW, also terminate it in the cockpit far enough forward that you can't fall of the transom of the boat.
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Old 04-25-2010
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Can someone post pictures of their jacklines and how you connected them to their boat?
I searched online and while there are discriptions, i haven't seen any photos on what this should look like. (ie - do you attach them to a cleat, if you have nothing else? Do you use a bowline or an anchor hitch? etc)

thanks
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Old 04-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I second what FSMike said... especially if you're singlehanding the boat at all. BTW, also terminate it in the cockpit far enough forward that you can't fall of the transom of the boat.
This I agree with. Also increase the strength of your life lines and put snaking (netting) along them. Snaking has keep me from going over the side in rough seas a couple of times.
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Old 04-25-2010
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Great timing on this thread.

I will be installing jacklines for this season.

The challenge I have is that I have a small boat as well (26' with 8 1/2' beam).

I want to run a line from the cockpit to the mast and from the mast to the bow (or at least the forward cleat) - this will reduce the flex on the jackline.

From the mast forward should not be a problem. I don't know how I'm going to set up the line from the cockpit forward. I'd like to keep the line as close to the centreline as possible - to prevent me going overboard. The trouble is My companionway hatch takes up a big part of my carriage top so I would have to either clip the end of the jackline to the hatch cover (I doubt it is solid enough to take the strain should someone hang off the end of their tether); I could put the attachment points on either side of the hatch - but this would bring the jacklines very close to the railing at the cockpit and not prevent going overboard (unless I use a really short tether); or put the attachment point so that it goes in front of the hatch cover - this would make it challenging to clip on when the hatch is open and may prevent the hatch opening at all.

I was planning on using folding padeyes with backing plates for the connection points by the cockpit, and my mast foot and forward cleat for the connection points forward.

I have a good tether (a 6' section and a 3' section, with a quick-release shackle, similar to, but not exactly this model) and a harness integrated into my pfd (Mustang MD3154) which I wear at all times when underway.

My thought, after reading a few threads on this subject, was to go with the flat nylon webbing for the jacklines. I will have them custom made with clips at each end in order to deploy them quickly.

Any ideas about where to make the connection point by the cockpit?
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Old 04-25-2010
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Jackstays/jacklines specs from ISAF

The ISAF Offshore Special Regulations contain excellent guidelines for jacklines (amongst other specs).

See section 4.04.1 (jacklines) & 4.04.2 (clipping points). Key points:
- jacklines both sides
- breaking strain of webbing and related attachment points = 4,500lbs
- clipping points so that you can be attached during entering/exiting the companionway.

Re: tethers, I have heard feedback from a number of offshore racers, that the Wichard snap hooks are more difficult to squeeze and open when you have cold hands. There is a remote possibility that the Wichard hooks could hook onto something else if under load.. e.g. a taught jib sheet alongside the jackline.
I have always used Gibb snap hooks with the locking gate for two reasons:
- easy to open the "gate" with cold hands - requires no strength to flip the locking gate open with a thumb
- not possible to accidentally open and attach itself to anything else like adjacent jib sheets or other taught lines while moving around the deck.

A twin tether with 1 metre and 2 metre webbing lengths, Gibb locking snap hooks, and quick release at the D ring harness attachment end, is an excellent combination.
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Old 04-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwelshman View Post
I will be installing jacklines for this season.

The challenge I have is that I have a small boat as well (26' with 8 1/2' beam).

I want to run a line from the cockpit to the mast and from the mast to the bow (or at least the forward cleat) - this will reduce the flex on the jackline.

From the mast forward should not be a problem. I don't know how I'm going to set up the line from the cockpit forward. I'd like to keep the line as close to the centreline as possible - to prevent me going overboard. The trouble is My companionway hatch takes up a big part of my carriage top so I would have to either clip the end of the jackline to the hatch cover (I doubt it is solid enough to take the strain should someone hang off the end of their tether); I could put the attachment points on either side of the hatch - but this would bring the jacklines very close to the railing at the cockpit and not prevent going overboard (unless I use a really short tether); or put the attachment point so that it goes in front of the hatch cover - this would make it challenging to clip on when the hatch is open and may prevent the hatch opening at all.

I was planning on using folding padeyes with backing plates for the connection points by the cockpit, and my mast foot and forward cleat for the connection points forward.

I have a good tether (a 6' section and a 3' section, with a quick-release shackle, similar to, but not exactly this model) and a harness integrated into my pfd (Mustang MD3154) which I wear at all times when underway.

My thought, after reading a few threads on this subject, was to go with the flat nylon webbing for the jacklines. I will have them custom made with clips at each end in order to deploy them quickly.

Any ideas about where to make the connection point by the cockpit?
A few thoughts:

I posted this:Sail Delmarva: Climbing Gear for Sailors; or Jacklines and Harnesses for the Unemployed. It is for catamarans, but there are some pictures that might help.

I would not use a bowline - very weak. If they are not sewn, assuming they are 1-inch webbing, use a waterknot to make a loop and hitch that to the cleat. Or tie it to the aft attachment point and cleat it at the bow in the traditional manner. This is the normal way.

Regarding center vs. side deck, I would consider using the side deck and then always clipping the windward side. But I am a catamaran guy; still, we always use the windward line if possible.

Regarding ending the jackline aft, consider that it can end in front of the cockpit and the tether will reach forward a bit. Consider the bolt hangers pictured here: Sail Delmarva: Sample Calculations for Jackline Stress and Energy Absorption, but do make sure they are very well fastened.

Regarding scratching the paint, it hasn't been an issue. Use and aluminum locking biner on the jackline end and the problem will be less. Just as strong, lighter, and cheaper. Do keep them greased.
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Old 04-27-2010
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I wouldn't recommend clips on both ends of the jackline - how will you tighten it? Everything stretches with time, even jacklines. I just use a conventional cleat hitch on the end without the clip.
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