Newbie advice - tips and tricks for buying/ maintaining classic wooden boats - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-19-2010
Adax's Avatar
Smutje
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Adax is on a distinguished road
Newbie advice - tips and tricks for buying/ maintaining classic wooden boats

What advice would you give to newbies who set out to buy a classic wooden boat as their first boat ? We might go directly for a bluewater boat or a boat just to learn on. ( We plan river cruising mainly to get experience )

So what good tips could you share with me, please? Anything from what parts of the boat you should check when buying as they are telltale places of rot to the best wax to use on interior cabinets and anything else in between .

Many thanks for your help .

PS: The one about "make friends with the bank manager " we know
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 05-19-2010
creedence623's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: At Large
Posts: 234
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
creedence623 is on a distinguished road
I would say, unless you are a skilled woodworker, or a glutton for punishmnent avoid vintage wooden boats! Making friends with the bank manager for the initial purchase is good advice, but it the secondary costs are going to eat you alive.

I would suggest as a first boat, that you look in to fiberglass. As a hull material it is relatively maintenance free. Believe me when I say that the learning curve is pretty steep when you buy your first boat, and IMHO the last thing you need to worry about at such an early stage in boat ownership is the hull's ability to keep water out.

I'm sure there will be many more educated opinions to come, but that is my 2 cents. In any case I hope you find the right boat, and enjoy it!

Last edited by creedence623; 05-19-2010 at 09:22 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 05-19-2010
Adax's Avatar
Smutje
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Adax is on a distinguished road
Thanks Creedence. We have our heart pretty much set on a wooden boat .The good news is that we are both handy,not experienced woodworkers, but I have tried my hand at cabinet making and I am looking forward to the sanding toning my arms ,that is if I don't lose patience and reach for the powersander first.
And thanks for the good wishes on the boat .
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 05-19-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,448
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adax View Post
Thanks Creedence. We have our heart pretty much set on a wooden boat .The good news is that we are both handy,not experienced woodworkers, but I have tried my hand at cabinet making and I am looking forward to the sanding toning my arms ,that is if I don't lose patience and reach for the powersander first.
And thanks for the good wishes on the boat .
Unless money is no object, it's a lot more than " sanding..." see
Restoration
and various related threads by CharlieCobra like
Oh Joy Resto 04/03/10.
__________________
Certified...in several regards...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 05-19-2010
Adax's Avatar
Smutje
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Adax is on a distinguished road
Thanks for that . My comment about sanding was just to display a can do attitude,really . We already know marine carpenters who do not charge the earth, if there are jobs we cannot handle. (and there will be)

Thanks for the reference to Charlie Cobra .He has an interest project there,but way more than we would ever consider taking on as a first boat . The one that is in the running seems cared for by means of the chequebook, so the initial work should be minimal . Keeping it minimal in the future will be the trick .
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 05-19-2010
deniseO30's Avatar
Move over Joan Rivers!
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 6,145
Thanks: 52
Thanked 89 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
Adax.. what Charlie does is not exstream by any means when it comes to wooden boats.

Where you are has a big bearing on type and condition of wooden boats. the North Atlantic being good (cold salt water)

I've studied wooden boats most of my life. I'm actually a somewhat good woodworker and have the ability and know how to build and or restore wooden boats. And... I don't own a wooden sailboat. I am down to selling off my last wooden canoe however.

Sadly, so many people with good intent get into a wooden boat and in a year or so realize it's more then they dreame of. it's hard work!

If your still not swayed I would suggest you join a maritime museum that has an active boat building/restoration shop. or start meeting wooden boat builders in your area. You will find many people very happy to share the knowledge. woodenboat discussion forums are priceless also.

Do Link us up with the boat you have in mind. What you see is not always what you get in wooden boats.
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 05-19-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 4,998
Thanks: 5
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 11
wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about
I'm going to get blasted for this post from both sides I think.

First, I have no experience with wooden boats, but I do have plenty of woodworking experience, so ...

I think the big thing most people probably don't realize is that the kind of wood working you use for cabinetry isn't really the same thing you'll be using for something like fixing a wood boat. In cabinets you are dealing with a lot of straight lines, and power tools, you're using table saws, circular saws, drill presses, table top planers, routers, etc. That's not going to be the case with something like a wooden boat, with a wooden boat there's no doubt going to be more artistry involved, bending wood, using wood chisels, etc, and a lot of materials you would never use in cabinet making. Why am I saying this ? Not to pick on cabinet makers, but I have seen people who make cabinets who can do a great job as long as they have their power tools but couldn't use or sharpen a chisel to save themselves. You can bang out an incredible amount of wood with chisels, odd shapes, strange curves, and touch things up as you are fitting them so that they are "just right", and even though I have never owned a wooden boat I'm sure there is a lot of that, and very little turning wood on a lathe type of work which is the kind of "wood working" most people think of when they think of building and maintaining things out of wood. If there is a perfect person to own a wooden boat I would think it would be a wood sculptor or possibly a furniture maker more than a cabinet maker, someone who can get in there with a hand plane and take a little off the edge to get the plank to squeeze in where it doesn't want to fit. This is the kind of wood working that requires a great deal of knowledge about how to sharpen hand tools, the edge does all the work!
__________________
What are you pretending not to know ?

Please support my
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by wind_magic; 05-19-2010 at 12:25 PM. Reason: sp
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 05-19-2010
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,152
Thanks: 32
Thanked 72 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
First, let's determine just what kind of boat we are discussing here- planked, stripped, cold moulded, hot moulded, a production boat, homebuilt? The style of construction has a big impact on what to look for. For example, telling you to check for missing caulking and iron sick planks would have you scratching your head if the boat in question is a WEST system construction.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 05-19-2010
Adax's Avatar
Smutje
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Adax is on a distinguished road
Denise ,thanks for that. We don't have a particular boat in mind yet . There is one that my other half will look at but not an inspection yet per se . They are likely to be by Argentine architects like Campos, Frers or Cibert (ca 1925- 55)
The work does not scare us so much as we don't have standard 9-5 jobs, so hopefully there will be time . I will look into a wooden boats forum ,in fact I already found one.

Wind magic thanks. You have actually made the thing more interesting . Do I know how too sharpen tools .No . Would I like to learn -yeah ... In the meantime if anything is desperately urgent, no choice but consult the professionals and yes we have budgeted for that .

BL Jones, thanks you have reminded me that I am a newbie The questions you asked I cannot answer straight away with certainty . It will be a production boat although,there are some one offs about, very likely planked ,but no idea what was the construction method at the time whether hot mouded or cold moulded .( I think hot but that is just an uneducated guess) We are looking at Parodi,Frers or Cibert designs .

Last edited by Adax; 05-19-2010 at 01:49 PM. Reason: added more info
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 05-19-2010
cormeum's Avatar
48' wood S&S yawl
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 421
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
cormeum is on a distinguished road
As a long term wood boat owner, If there is one variable that will either make or break you, it's initial condition. Secondarily would be build quality.

If the boat is in good shape, the annual maintenance is not that onerous.
Bottom paint: Everyone has to do that
Topside: every other year
Varnish: annually (scuff and recoat)

If the boat has been neglected, there's a Charlie Cobra amount of work ahead of you to put things right.

System maintenance is the same whether your boat is glass, wood or metal.

Unlike our Plastic hulled bretheren, a wood boat does not accept being lax in necessary maintenance- things have to be fixed RIGHT AWAY if they involve seeps, leaks or coating failures.

Full disclosure- we do all of our own annual maintenance.

Last edited by cormeum; 05-19-2010 at 04:06 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:05 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.