Why you should both pull in the painter line, and learn to anchor properly... - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 05-26-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarCry View Post
WM, I almost always dive my anchor. I started doing it as a newbie as visual confirmation that all was OK and still do.

Not to start anchor wars but I very seldom dive on my anchor anymore. I used to do it with the Bruce (only two flukes in) and the CQR (on its side again) but since I got a Manson Supreme I don't bother. I anchor mostly in sand and mud. Occasionally grassy, hard packed sand. Sticks right in.
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  #12  
Old 05-26-2010
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Gosh this is too much pressure. Not only am I supposed to remember to pull in the dinghy painter but now I'm supposed to anchor properly as well? Not sure I can handle the stress
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  #13  
Old 05-26-2010
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MJ, clearly you are not following the procedures as witnessed in the area of the OP's story. First you need to rent a half million dollar vessel that is way beyond your skill set. Drink too much rum all day long while listening to your favorite Jimmy Buffet CD and then proudly parade your seamanship for all to see while trying to set an anchor. After all the rum, you no longer feel any pressure at all!!!!! Or, to phrase it differently==Drink rum til your dumb and numb!!!!
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  #14  
Old 05-26-2010
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another view of screwups

My confession - while chartering in the BVI naturally we ended up at Virgin Gorda, and with teenagers on, off, on, off, then on the dinghy again and again - the painter was long when I wanted the painter to be short.
So I backed down on the mooring, painter and dinghy simultaneously. Twisted the line around the shaft, heard the sound of a straining diesel followed by my own "oh ****" (also simultaneously).
After a moment all was well - no boats (including mine) in danger. We were on the mooring, secure, but I was not capable of motoring anywhere fast or slow. So over the side I went.
The water there is crystal clear, the wrap of line immediately apparent, my knife and the barnacles on the bottom sharp as can be. I cleared the tangle and came up apparently triumphant...until my teenage daughter ( the one on and off the dinghy) screamed about blood, sharks and some other undecipherables.
Cut my hand pretty good somewhere down there; but "frogmen" or the lucky feel no pain.
We ended our day at Bitter End when (figuring a few stitches were probably in order) I asked where a doctor might be. Pointing across the bay, motions of climbing and directions for asking where he might actually be on the side of the other side of the bay convinced me it maybe probably was not THAT bad a wound. So we went for a (really good) hamburger and an adult beverage to think about it.
There is a small chandlery at Bitter End with pirate flags, Bitter End coasters, t shirts and some boat stuff, including super glue. Super Glue! Which I have seen used in real surgery and if it was good enough for actual doctors therefore it was good enough for me.
Hamburger ordered, adult beverage on table and wound cleaned within Caribbean limits I sloshed the glue - as per instructions - over both surfaces to be attached. Again, according to directions I held the joint together for ten minutes or so with the only clamp I had available - my other fingers.
A triumphant unveiling unfortunately involves "unveiling", as in showing something not seen before. Friends and family had been watching me hold the formerly gaping wound for some time and were not at all surprised when the index and middle fingers from my left hand inexplicably remained attached to the formerly gaping wound on my right hand.
Yup - I stopped the bleeding but glued my hands together. Damn.
Peeling all apart hurt more than the original wound, but not being stupid I learned from experience and used pressure and duct tape to hold it together the second time.
A few years later I have no more scarring than I would have gotten from the doctor. I saved some hours hunting for medical care and I enjoyed a good burger and a (couple) adult beverages. So I have an elevated respect for super glue and duct tape.
They are forevermore a part of my medical kit and I must confess I have a desire for an emergency appendectomy, lobotomy or any reason for trepanning ( have forstner bits, will travel) so I can show my mastery of spreading the super glue on both sides of the wound AND staying back while it dries.
Great seamanship will deliver you through many the storm but selective or elective stupidity leaves you with memories, scars and tales to remember.
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Old 05-26-2010
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Wraped painters, sharp knives, barnacles, adult beverages, and super glue!

What a great story! You Da Man Dfok!
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  #16  
Old 05-26-2010
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FarCry thanks for the tip. I never thought spending too much money while getting drunk on rum and acting like an ass was anything more than a sport. Now I realize what an invaluable skill it really is

DaFok great story. Think I'll stock up on super glue.
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  #17  
Old 05-27-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dfok View Post
Great seamanship will deliver you through many the storm but selective or elective stupidity leaves you with memories, scars and tales to remember.
I was laughing through the entire story, but this is my favorite quote of them all
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  #18  
Old 05-27-2010
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See, see! I't not just powerboaters that don't know to anchor!!
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Old 05-27-2010
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Considering that I earned my living by working on everything from Sternwheelers to Ships. All the times that I've anchored, I've Never dove on an anchor.
Planning the anchoring evolution: a. where I want my anchor. b. the depth of the water and amount of rode I want out. c. my swing room. d. the approach to the anchorage. e. Including easing back on the anchor to ensure that it properly set. F. Then set the anchor watch to ensure that we are not dragging and no one else is dragging their anchor down on to us.
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  #20  
Old 05-27-2010
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Diving on the anchor accomplishes 4 things:

1. It gives you a chance to cool off on a hot summer's day.

2. You get to look around for all sorts of neat stuff on the bottom.

3. It gives you the assurance you need to crack open that bottle of rum you've been waiting to unwind with.

4. Finally, it gives you a chance to see if your anchor's properly set.
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