I had a great sail today. - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree42Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 06-28-2010
DrB DrB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New England
Posts: 966
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 8
DrB will become famous soon enough
Two weekends of sweet winds and weather

Last weekend the a friend and the admiral and I sailed from Marblehead to Rockport, MA. Normally about a 4 h trip at just under 5 kts average. Winds were in a very favorable direction and we had a beam reach/broad run in 10 kts apparent for the whole way up, Boat averaged just over 6 kts and the seas were 1 ft or less while the temps were in the mid 70's. We went a little further north of the Rockport and played around in 22 kt winds. We changed headsails to depower the boat and blasted around for an hour or so at 5.5 kts closehauled at a comfy 15 deg heel.

Next morning, T-storms were predicted to roll in around noon, so we left early and had to motor about 40 minutes as the wind was on the nose. Once around the tip of Cape Anne, the winds were just hovering around 10 kts and between a closehaul and close reach direction. Temps were in the mid 60's We left the smaller jib on in case the T-storm rolled in sooner than expected. Still, we averaged 4 to 5 kts on one tack all the way to the hook. T-storms rolled in about 5 PM, but the winds died just after we arrived and the temps really heated up (85 deg), before the boomers came through.

This past weekend, on Saturday I raced on an Etchells and we had some decent winds until the second race. No wind meant cancel, but the wind picked up nicely on the ride back to the dock. Grabbed some late lunch and talked a friend into a evening sail on my boat. Left the hook at 7 PM with the the Genny up and sailed out 3 NM on a beam run/reach averaging 4 to 6 kts in 6 to 12 kts apparent. Did a 180 and headed back in in winds 8 to 16 apparent on a close reach. Off the boat by 9 PM and downing a frosty cold one 20 minutes later.

Next day, the Admiral and I sailed of the mooring at 10 AM ish under wispy clouds and bright sunlight. Headed out and zig zagged up wind 8 to 12 kts for about an hour and a half, catching every boat that we "raced". Headed back and sail almost all the way to the mooring. Turned out that the was nicest part of the day for sailing. Skies started to turn grey, winds picked up, and rain shower came through about 3:45.

Can't complain about any of the days that I have gone sailing this year. Most have been super nice.

DrB
__________________
If you liked my advice/response, give me some rep points. If you didn't......well what do you expect, it was free.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 06-29-2010
thorrad's Avatar
Catalina 36 Liveaboard
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
thorrad is on a distinguished road
So this one was from a little while ago but it does go down as the best single day I have had on a boat so here goes.

I started out with the family leaving the dock at 9am into what looked and felt like the perfect day. I had no idea how good it was going to get.

We have to lock through to get to the salt water here in Seattle and we were all a bit nervous about it with the wife liking to be very well prepared as she has crewed under very unforgiving captains in the past. I allowed her time to get things ready to her specs before I started into the lock and things went smoothly. Locking through is a fun experience with kids and they had a blast as we went down with the negative tide that morning.

We made our way out of the channel into Puget sound and were following the wind south to Blake Island. It was the first time I have gone there so I had spent some time going over the charts beforehand. For me the planning is almost as much fun as the voyaging so I had been in heaven since before my wife even got up...

Since the wind was with us and it was very light we motored down to the island, a journey of only a few miles that took around an hour.

Lunch was had swinging on a buoy just off shore. I didn't have a dinghy at that point so beach exploration was out and we spent our time watching a group of ROTC campers operate a landing craft just north of us on the shore. A cool thing to see!

After lunch I raised the main and unfurled the genoa and we just sailed out of the anchorage and off to the west northwest. A few tacks later had us up a couple of miles and heading into Eliott Bay. Along the way we spotted a harbor seal, several sea lions and even a small harbor porpoise. The sun and the freshening breeze were music to my soul as we sped along at hull speed tack after delightful tack. we mad our way for about three hours across the sound this way and that beating to windward in calm seas and about 10 knots of wind. It was awesome!

Eventually I got ready to head for home. The wife had gone to sleep forward with our daughter while my son and I sailed so when I started the motor and drove for Shilshole we timed it so we wouldn't have to wake her until i really needed her on deck. As it turned out, there was only one issue with the whole trip. We had to wait for a very slow train at the train bridge before we could enter the locks but that was a minor annoyance.

The lock back up was smooth and easy and in this case we looked like professional mariners hooking our lines and standing by while the rest of the rabble flowed in after us. There was a lot of yelling at other boaters behind us and there were near accidents in the lock far behind but we confidently held our heads high in the knowledge we had set ourselves up to have a great locking experience. This time there was a lot more attention in the lock and we had another great time going through.

Arriving home at the slip I was so very happy to have had the day out on the sound. It felt literally like I had spent a week on vacation. The family was completely happy and had a great time.

Since we live aboard I hope to have many more like this one... What a lovely day.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 07-06-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Maple Ridge, BC
Posts: 245
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
GraemeInCanada is on a distinguished road
I've been looking forward to posting this up for a bit now but my nice sail was the first sail of the year for me this year. I'm up in BC, Canada and we've got an area called the Indian Arm which is just inside the Burrard Inlet which is what Vancouver is situated around.

The day was one of our first sunny warm days and it was a perfect day to go for a day sail. I needed to air out the sails and the opportunity just couldn't be passed up. Off I went with my day off of working to just straight enjoy the beautiful warm sunny day that we so irregularly get on the BC coast until summer hits.

The wind was just right from the moment I got out there and it managed to push me all the way up to the turning point to head north towards a place called Deep Cove and further on to a marine park, power dam and a place called Wigwam Inn (old building now owned by one of the expensive yacht clubs around here) which sits close to a very nice waterfall and picnicking area.

Once pushed up to there on a pretty much straight run, I turned a bit and sailed on reach for some fun and then headed back on a close reach which got some nice speed up in an area where it's rare (other than the occasional tanker) to have somebody in your way and in fact is a great chance to catch up to another sailboat or two and have more fun.

I would love to be able to put it in even more nice words and write a whole story but to honest a picture, and in this case a video, speaks for itself: The Periwinkle Catboat and Stargazer Blog: First sail of 2010 for Stargazer (video) I hope it's nearly as enjoyable as the actual day was for me.
__________________
My blog on boat related stuff:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 12-11-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 12,919
Thanks: 79
Thanked 71 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 8
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Here's what's great about Texas...well, Austin: We're still sailing.

Very nice little sail today. The winds were 20 knots gusting to 32 (true). Nothing crazy, just breezy.

As I mentioned elsewhere, we currently have a 4hp OB on the Smacktanic, which is woefully wimpy. On the way out of the marina, pushing into 25 knots of wind, the bow kept wanting to fall off and the motor couldn't compensate. We barely clawed away from the rocks of the lee shore. Must get bigger motor.

We threw up a reefed main and beat into the wonderfully fresh breeze. The sun was shining, it was in the high 70's. Things were nice.





We kept seeing this boat with a hopped up main (above) laying over with the gusts (full main and maybe 70% of their headsail). On the one hand, I gave them a mental fist bump for pulling down the FC rail dip, on the other the fact that they weren't really controlling the boat made me very embarrassed for them. I mean c'mon, you do actually have to sail.

After a while, they came back around and snuck past us (we were still under reefed main only). It was a nice looking boat so I yelled over my scotch and asked what it was. A Pearson Flyer they responded as they laid over on their side again despite 6 people on the rail and ran over a buoy. I face-palmed. It was, however, a fast boat. I was stoked.

So, out came the 150 and we started chasing them. What a day!







Nothing crazy. Nothing deserving of a BFS. But a hell of a lot of fun sailing in big wind and chillin'.

A year ago, this would have been a BFS. Now, it was kind of the perfect day.

I love 30 knots and flat water.

PS - For the whiney-ass doubters:

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40

Last edited by smackdaddy; 12-11-2010 at 11:30 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 12-11-2010
HDChopper's Avatar
Needing Apehanger Helm
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: AZ
Posts: 495
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
HDChopper is on a distinguished road
Ahhhhh ... I knew a fix would show up sooner or later if I kept my eye on this thread
__________________
There is no right way to do the wrong thing
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 12-11-2010
Sea Slacker
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,789
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
brak is on a distinguished road
Flat water at 30 kts? How do you get that? That must be nice.

I had a nice sail today as well. Well, perhaps not as nice as yours (of course at 20kts of wind my boat would pretty much capsize under bare poles ) - but on the other hand I get to do 8kts in 12kts of wind.

Crappy photos taken with iphone.



Here is 7.5kts - top speed was about 8.1. I am sure a better sailor could do more but I like to keep it safe.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 12-11-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 12,919
Thanks: 79
Thanked 71 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 8
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Very nice brak!

As for the flat water, I sail on a lake. So it can be blowing 50 knots and we'll only get 4' waves. It's really kind of fun.

Man, is there anything better than sailing? I mean anything????
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 12-12-2010
downeast450's Avatar
Tundra Down
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Seal Harbor, Maine
Posts: 1,220
Thanks: 25
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
downeast450 is on a distinguished road
Ready about! Hard a Lee!

Smack

When my 27 year old son was 5 or 6 his role aboard "Sea Mouse", our Rhodes 22, was to push the tiller across on each tack. With both hands, he would push it ahead of him while walking across the lazerett hatch. Those were priceless sails. BFS for sure! "Ready about!..... Hard a Lee!" were words he very quickly learned to anticipate. He will be cruising the Maine coast with us this coming season. Lucky me! Ha!

Down
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 12-13-2010
bobmcgov's Avatar
baDumbumbum
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Windy Wyoming
Posts: 1,019
Thanks: 0
Thanked 24 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bobmcgov will become famous soon enough
Nice one, Smack! Lake sailing gets dissed a lot, but it is a world unto its own. Frequent tacks & jibes, more upwind work than ocean sailing, and winds that vary 20 kts and 120 degrees. Some truly excellent all-around sailors (Buddy Melges, et al) have been inland lake specialists. True, we know nada about currents, tides, navigation, self-steering, or swells, but we can trim sails, steer fine, and change gears with the best of em. And we tack forty times a day, so we get pretty good at it.

37 mph is stout. Did it build to that and hold, or was it one of those blasts that come screeding off the dunes without warning, knocking the water flat and turning it gunmetal gray? Some of those gusts remind me of the Bikini Atoll H-bomb tests -- a shockwave traveling at horrifying speed while you scramble to get a reef in and the jib under control. We've been caught by 50 kt winds thus unprepared. It makes for a crowded few minutes. But with no waves, it's more noise than actual danger. Ain't gonna roll you.

We took some experienced ocean sailors out on our pissant mountain lake this year. They said it was the hardest sailing they'd ever done, because the boat never settles down. It's always hunting for a groove, & not quite finding it. Just when you think you have the sails balanced, the heel correct, and the right amount of helm dialed in ... the wind changes 30 degrees and 10 knots. *sigh*
__________________
Buccaneer18, Grainnia
SJ21, Diarmuid
Albin Ballad 30, Fionn
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 12-13-2010
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 12,919
Thanks: 79
Thanked 71 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 8
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobmcgov View Post
Nice one, Smack! Lake sailing gets dissed a lot, but it is a world unto its own. Frequent tacks & jibes, more upwind work than ocean sailing, and winds that vary 20 kts and 120 degrees. Some truly excellent all-around sailors (Buddy Melges, et al) have been inland lake specialists. True, we know nada about currents, tides, navigation, self-steering, or swells, but we can trim sails, steer fine, and change gears with the best of em. And we tack forty times a day, so we get pretty good at it.

37 mph is stout. Did it build to that and hold, or was it one of those blasts that come screeding off the dunes without warning, knocking the water flat and turning it gunmetal gray? Some of those gusts remind me of the Bikini Atoll H-bomb tests -- a shockwave traveling at horrifying speed while you scramble to get a reef in and the jib under control. We've been caught by 50 kt winds thus unprepared. It makes for a crowded few minutes. But with no waves, it's more noise than actual danger. Ain't gonna roll you.

We took some experienced ocean sailors out on our pissant mountain lake this year. They said it was the hardest sailing they'd ever done, because the boat never settles down. It's always hunting for a groove, & not quite finding it. Just when you think you have the sails balanced, the heel correct, and the right amount of helm dialed in ... the wind changes 30 degrees and 10 knots. *sigh*
Dude, you nailed it. That is exactly what it's like. And I keep telling those guys like Dog - who talk down their nose to us lake sailors, that we're just better sailors than they are. 3 days on the same tack? Freakin' slackers. Heh-heh.

The wind was steady at 22 knots with very frequent gusts to what you see above. That 32 knots hit us just after we'd gotten out of the marina - which caused the scare with the outboard. We'd reefed the main at the dock and once it was up it was a pretty mellow ride even with the gusts. And as you know, you can definitely see those gusts coming on the surface of the water, so you just need to stay frosty on the sheets.

I'm really amazed at how well the C27 can point into stiff wind, even with only a reefed main flying. It's such a great boat. And we are getting very good at sailing upwind and working our tacks and jibes. We smoked a Bene First 30 a few weeks back because it couldn't point as high as we could.

Later the gusts mellowed out a bit, so we threw up the 150 and had a freakin' blast. It was too much headsail for that much wind (110 would have been perfect) - but it's what we had so we rode it.

I've sailed in 40 knots once (pretty scary) and seen 50 knots once while at the slip. The latter was insane. I was really glad I wasn't out in that. But you're right, it's just the wind (not waves) so it's such a great learning experience in terms of concentrating on dealing with the boat itself and not worrying about sea state.

On step at a time!

Sincerely,

Buddy
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40

Last edited by smackdaddy; 12-13-2010 at 12:53 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trimming Your Asymmetrical Spinnaker sandygoodall Seamanship Articles 14 03-31-2010 09:27 AM
Sloop, Cutter or Ketch jsgsail Boat Review and Purchase Forum 17 12-26-2008 02:47 PM
Headsail Reefing Basics Brian Hancock Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-05-2004 08:00 PM
The Basics of Reefing Mark Matthews Cruising Articles 0 03-29-2004 07:00 PM
Racers' Sail Care Tips Dan Dickison Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-15-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:51 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012