You read a book and now know how to sail?! - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 41
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
That is too funny! Sinking a 14ft. fishing boat in bad weather is a "slight" incident? Lol. Can't say I blame the gf one iota.

Listen to Wayne. He is right on. Jane was wrong: The best way to learn to sail a big boat is to learn on a dingy. Also, dingy sailing is very fun. In fact, often more fun than sailing a 40 foot condo. After you get the fundamentals of sailing down (it doesn't take long), race the dingy. I have learned a lot about sailing by racing. More often than not I don't come in first, but I have fun and learn something new nearly every time I go.

My husband wouldn't come out with me after having watched (from shore) me capsize one too many Hobies at resorts. Go by yourself and gain back her confidence. Sailing is suppose to be fun. It wouldn't be fun for either of you if you have to nag her to go.

I've been in enough local races now that I fooled my husband into thinking I am a good sailor. What he doesn't know won't hurt him as long as I don't take him out in rough weather and sink the boat.
Dulcitea is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Aspiring to be a Mexican
 
sww914's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: La Cruz de Hunacaxtle, Mexico
Posts: 542
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
 
All experience is helpful. She's wrong. A small boat will make you very aware of your mistakes and quickly, a big boat often will forgive your small mistakes and only clunk you in the head with the large mistakes, when it's really bad.
Same as learning to race a slow car fast, when you don't have anything to power you out of mistakes, your mistake keeps reminding you all the way down the straightaway of how slow you're going. A small boat will keep reminding you of your mistake until you dry out.
sww914 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Grand Rapids Michigan
Posts: 13
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
ymiri - I would take the lesson no matter what. I was looking to get into sailing as well and decided the best thing for my situation was to start small. I have a 14' day sailer that I bought for $500. The first time I went out my wife went with me, we experienced sailing together for the first time. We both feel we need lessons, but we can get real world knowledge on a boat that I have a very small investment in. There are all sorts of things that I can learn. I have a local YC that I can take lessons on here so I will likely do that by summer's end, but I will have already read a few books and gone sailing on my own on an inland lake a couple times. I also have a few ASA certified courses I can take, but the cost of my wife and I to both take lessons was 2x what my Dingy cost. We have other sailers on our lake also so asking to go out with them is the next step in my plan. Maybe you could convince your GF that sailing is a life skill and you could learn together. I have 3 kids so it was easy, I just told my wife we could get them off the couch and out in the world in the summer and she was all for it.

Brad

Last edited by BC100700; 06-11-2010 at 01:13 PM. Reason: spelling/grammer error
BC100700 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
48' wood S&S yawl
 
cormeum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 421
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Learned on FJ's as a kid. I agree, learn dinghy sailing first (fun, easy and catastrophes are no big deal), then move up.

GI Jane is incorrect. But it does go to show that given luck, most can sail anywhere.
cormeum is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern California
Posts: 108
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
In some way, all the answers are OK. But if you want to learn and understand the fundamentals, go to the dingy classes. It's not that you can't learn these skills on your own, but your learning curve will be faster, and you will (probably) learn how to be a safer sailor on the water through these classes.

As an example, a young person can learn to drive a car by driving down the freeway. But that same young person, with a few lessons on driving safety and proper driving techniques will be less of a danger to himself and others when he/she does get on the road.

Good luck! And update us on your experiences.

Eric
ericread is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 31 Old 06-11-2010 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Thanks for all the advice everybody. I will look into the dinghy lessons and test a run with the boat itself. It will be in the water in a couple of weeks.
I selected a few posts that help my cause and forwarded to my GF (made sure to take out the one by 'Dulcitea'
Thanks again everybody
ymiri is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
ymirir,

Where are you located? Depending on that the people on this forum could suggest where to get some lessons. In my opinion, taking lessons is priceless. And practicing on your boat, what you learn is even more priceless. After that experience teaches you forever.

Alternatively you can go to Find a Sailing School - American Sailing Association and find a sailing school near you. I am assuming you are in the continental US...:-) If you are in the SF Bay area, I have a great sailing instructor I can send you to.

Hope that helps.
SeaFever2000 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 31 Old 06-11-2010 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I wish I lived there... Actually in Canada close to St. Laurence sea way .

Last edited by ymiri; 06-11-2010 at 01:53 PM.
ymiri is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Taking lessons, especially something like an ASA 101 "learn to sail" or basic keelboat course, is a great way to get a solid foundation for your sailing career. It will give you the basic theory, tools, vocabulary and skills that are required of a sailor, and these will apply to most boats.

Going out with experienced sailors can be a good learning experience, but I'd caution that some sailors are horrible teachers, regardless of how good a sailor they are. Also, some very experienced sailors do not know the proper techniques and will teach you some very bad or dangerous habits if you're not careful.

Between an ASA 101 type course, a good book like Dave Seidman's The Complete Sailor, and your own boat, you should be able to learn quite a bit.

However, daysailing does not require the same skills that cruising sailors require. Route planning, navigation, and many other skills are often not required when just daysailing, and if you're interested in making longer voyages, then you'll need those skills as well. The USCG Aux, USPS, and other organizations often hold courses on things like navigation, which I'd highly recommend you look into. I'd also HIGHLY recommend you get Richard K. Hubbard's book, Boater's Bowditch, which is basically Bowditch re-written for the small craft navigator.

I'd point out that river sailing can have some challenges that are often not seen on lakes or even on protected bays...

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 31 Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
I am sure other Canadians on this forum can point you to similar organizations near you.
BTW, did you know that the St. Laurence seaway was constructed jointly by Canada and the USA? Interesting, eh?
SeaFever2000 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome