Columbus's ships - How propelled? - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 34 Old 08-02-2010 Thread Starter
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Columbus's ships - How propelled?

I am a layman in this field. I am talking about things happened in 1492. Columbus crossed atlantic ocean with his ship Santa Maria. My doubt is how was the ship propelled? Did he use any engines (interanl combustion or external combustion) in his ship?
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post #2 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Are you kidding? On that time they had only rowing boats, sailing boats and rowing and sailing boats. His boat was a sailing boat. No rows. When they needed they pulled the big boat with a smaller rowing boat they carried inside.

Santa Maria Replica - Pesquisa do Google=

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post #3 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Okay, I'm going to resist the urge for any disparaging comments and just say that internal combustion engines were not invented until HUNDREDS OF YEARS after 1492! Columbus's ships were propelled by sail. If there was no wind they might send a few guys out in a row boat to tow the larger ship.
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post #4 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
Okay, I'm going to resist the urge for any disparaging comments and just say that internal combustion engines were not invented until HUNDREDS OF YEARS after 1492!
The OP did not restrict the question to IC engines and steam engines date back 2,000 years with the first known use on a boat almost 500 years ago, in 1543 by Blasco de Garay.

On the other hand, all of that was pretty sketchy compared to the real steamships that emerged starting in the 1700's, so Columbus was still a couple of hundred years early.

To the OP; seriously, man, come on.
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post #5 of 34 Old 08-02-2010 Thread Starter
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One more doubt. Suppose the people are in the middle of their journey. Total distance is 3500 miles. They have already travelled 1750 miles from Spain (wind is flowing from Spain to America). They want to cancel the journey and return to Spain (against wind). Is this possible with their ship?
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post #6 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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One more doubt. Suppose the people are in the middle of their journey. Total distance is 3500 miles. They have already travelled 1750 miles from Spain (wind is flowing from Spain to America). They want to cancel the journey and return to Spain (against wind). Is this possible with their ship?
Quite clearly it is possible, since Columbus returned to Spain to report his findings. Have you never opened a history book?
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post #7 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Quite clearly it is possible, since Columbus returned to Spain to report his findings.
Yes, but he returned with the wind.

Those ships could sail upwind when they needed to, but not very close or well, so Columbus and crew would have starved to death or run out of drinkable water if they tried to just turn directly around at that point.

This whole thread is kind of lame. All of this information is really well documented on the internet.

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post #8 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Yes, but he returned with the wind.

This whole thread is kind of lame. All of this information is really well documented on the internet.
I search in Gaagle. it says Santa Maria was powered by nuclear reactor or some sort. Columbus must receive aliens help for sure.


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post #9 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Santa Maria

The US government presently has the Santa Maria at Area 51.

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I search in Gaagle. it says Santa Maria was powered by nuclear reactor or some sort. Columbus must receive aliens help for sure.
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post #10 of 34 Old 08-02-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adit View Post
I am a layman in this field. I am talking about things happened in 1492. Columbus crossed atlantic ocean with his ship Santa Maria. My doubt is how was the ship propelled? Did he use any engines (interanl combustion or external combustion) in his ship?
I would seriously suggest you read up on Columbus and his voyages to the (West) Indies.

Christopher Columbus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

and this shows his Atlantic tracks, using the currents and trade winds.


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