Bow eye vs. deck cleats for mooring line. - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 08-06-2010
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Bow eye vs. deck cleats for mooring line.

I was at a yacht club for the first time last weds and was told that the club required all boats to be moored via a bow eye.

The idea was that their would be less chafe problems.

What do you think about this idea?
Boats were sailboats from 20' to maybe 32' based on what I saw.
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Old 08-06-2010
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Yes, you'll have less chafe problems, but many boats don't have a bow eye. Most trailerable boats have a fairly substantial bow eye, but most larger boats do not. Adding one requires a fairly solid backing plate and possibly tieing it into the hull of the boat, in addition to the keelson.
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Old 08-07-2010
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Go somewhere else that doesn't have such a controlling atmosphere. Deck cleats can and do work fine for mooring.
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Old 08-08-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Yes, you'll have less chafe problems, but many boats don't have a bow eye. Most trailer able boats have a fairly substantial bow eye, but most larger boats do not. Adding one requires a fairly solid backing plate and possibly tyeing it into the hull of the boat, in addition to the keel-son.
Yes I can't remember seeing it on a non-tolerable boat but it would be rather easy to install in many boats I suspect.
Backing plate tied into the hull would be easy enough most places. The inside molded linings generally don't go that far forward. Don't know what you mean by tyeing to the keel-son?

If it would eliminate the chafing issue it would be a big thing.
On a bigger boat reaching it from the deck might be the biggest drawback.
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Old 08-08-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
On a bigger boat reaching it from the deck might be the biggest drawback.
Which would explain why bow eyes are normally confined to trailer-able boats. The keelson was the main timber in the hull that bisected the stbd. and port sides. No keelson in plastic boats although there may be an area that resembles a keelson (eg., the lowest joist).

If they want you to moor by a bow eye they also want you to have a trailer-able boat. That is my take.

If you know how to deal with mooring pendants and chafing gear it is much easier then dealing with a bow eye IMHO.
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Last edited by CalebD; 08-08-2010 at 10:26 PM. Reason: more is less
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Old 08-09-2010
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While there is no physical keelson on a fiberglass boat, most have a heavier, thicker section of laminate running down the centerline that acts much as the keelson on a wooden boat.
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