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  #1  
Old 08-07-2010
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Lazy jacks

As many of you know I recently purchased a Morgan 35 MK 2..

The boat came with Lazy Jacks, and after using them for several days at sea, I wonder if they are more trouble than they are worth.

Having to head into the wind to raise the sail, and for the most part they make it hard to lower the main sail in a stiff thunderstorm wind.

What’s your opinion?

Should I keep or ditch them.

Last edited by southwindphoto; 08-07-2010 at 06:49 AM. Reason: world missing
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Old 08-07-2010
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You should always head into the wind to raise and lower the main, lazy jacks or not. Give them a try for some period. You will probably get used to the technique. They may also need some adjustments to make them work better. A Dutchman system is better, but more expensive.
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Old 08-07-2010
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Why don't you just move them out of the way for a while, and see if you prefer it without them?
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Old 08-07-2010
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My boat is fitted and I hate them!-boat spent one winter out on its mooring and all the lines which were still attached were wrapped around the mast
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Old 08-07-2010
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As with everything, it is a compromise.

I like the way they hold my sail together when I drop it single-handed. The key word is single-handed; if I regularly had a crew - a couple of hands to flake the sail as it came down - I wouldn't need them.

I hate the way there are all these thin lines flopping all over the place, or messing up the shape of my main, or simply tangling up with everything they can and getting in the way.

But I still have 'em - because, as I said, I can drop the sail quickly and easily without it spreading over the deck.
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Old 08-07-2010
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I love the lazy jacks on my boat, but the setup I have allows me to fully retract the lazy jacks when sailing, so that they don't get in the way of raising the main, affect its shape, or chafe the sail.
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Old 08-07-2010
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I too only deploy the lazy jacks when lowering the sail. The rest of the time they are secured along side the mast and boom.
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Old 08-07-2010
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You know it never crossed my mind that I can lower my lazyjacks!-seriously!
I inherited them without instructions.
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Old 08-07-2010
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Do you have full length battens?

If yes try lubricating the sail track so that they fall as freely as possible.
That makes it more likely that you get a neat stack inside the lazy jacks.

However I agree that having to be exactly head to wind to avoid a snag when I hoist the main is a mega PITA. I slacken of the main sheet so I get some wiggle room but if motoring under autopilot I often have to go back and adjust the courseor if at anchor wait till it swings head to wind or near enough.

Still I like my lazy jacks and Mack stack pack.

Last edited by TQA; 08-07-2010 at 04:56 PM. Reason: spelling as usual
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Old 08-07-2010
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I just installed a Mack Pack lazy jack/sail bag system on my boat and I'm loving it. As others have point out there are some issues you'll have to work around but for us its a more than fair trade off. With just the wife and I dropping, flaking, securing and covering the sail was a 15 minute process that often resulted in a wrestling match with the sail and often a shouting match with the spouse. With the Mack Pack, dropping and stowing the sail is a 5 minute job for one person and if you just needed the sail down in a hurry it could be done a lot faster.

The system is designed so the jacks can be lowered and affixed at the gooseneck and the bag rolled down along the boom, so there is zero chafe or interference. I would only bother if I was on a long distance sail or was racing but its nice that you can.
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