novice question seas/ swells/winds and kids.. pleasure sailing ONLY... - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-09-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Motherof3 is on a distinguished road
novice question seas/ swells/winds and kids.. pleasure sailing ONLY...

Hi, My parents just bought a 40 foot saiolboat. Yes, they are newbies. Though I have been on our bay lots in my life, its always been as a guest, never as a sailor... so I don't know much about the science of sailing. My dad wants to take me and my 3 kids out (10,8, 2) but I worry about a novice captain and what to expect. The boat is riggged so he can just about handle it himself if he had to, but I am not able to tell you what kind of boat it is. i do know it has a 4.5 foot draft.
I've been out twice-- the first time we had 4 adults and the sea was really calm... we were in the protected area of the upper bay and it was smooth sailing, very comfortable.. no heeling, no rolling (few gentle wakes only).
Today, we motored out into the wind and sailed back with the wind behind us (I think this is accurate) I was told it was a 10-15 knot wind. The seas were 2-3 feet in my estimate. My dad said 2 feet, my brother said some swells were higher. Too much rocking and rolling to have 3 kids on board with a novice sailor IMHO... but I was poo-pooed and told all was fine. My question is what is resonable... if everyone here says 10-15 knots is fine siling in that boat, relax, enjoy it... then I'll assume its my own nerves getting to me. But, if folks here agree that those are slightly uncomfortable winds for siling with kids on deck... then I'll feel my fears are somewhat justified and I'll be sure to pick better weather next time. I just cannot ascertain if my worry is resonable or if its just me being a panicky momma.
Yes, the kids all had PDFs. Thank you for helping answer this question.
What are good seas, what are good winds for sailing a few hours with kids? Thank you all very much!!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-09-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,192
Thanks: 50
Thanked 37 Times in 36 Posts
Rep Power: 14
knothead has a spectacular aura about knothead has a spectacular aura about knothead has a spectacular aura about
You're just not used to sailing. Ten to fifteen isn't a big deal to anyone that's been sailing more than a few times.

The big issue here is how you feel.
If you don't trust your father and are not comfortable. Then you shouldn't go. You won't have a good time. Your fear will likely spoil it for the others. Including your kids. And if, God forbid, anything out of the usual happened. You would blame yourself for not following your intuition.

Don't go sailing unless you have confidence in your skipper or yourself. And don't take kids places where you aren't at ease. Go out a few times more without the kids and get use to it.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-09-2010
swampcreek's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Pasadena MD
Posts: 334
Thanks: 1
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 5
swampcreek is on a distinguished road
More information such as what body of water are you in and what experience does your Dad have would help. Here in the Chesapeake normally there isn't much that could hurt a 40 foot sailboat although anything is possible. 10 to 15 mph winds and a 2 - 3' chop is nothing to most small boats let alone a 40 footer. We take our little 26 footer out in that kind of weather without a second thought. I've had my 16' Hobie in heavier weather than that although we spill lots of wind and it's a real wet ride...FUN THOUGH!!! Sailboats as with most modes of transportation can handle many times over what the average operator can meaning in the analysis of an accident it usually ends up like this...The boat could've taken that storm, the captain couldn't or the motorcycle could've taken that sharp turn, the rider lost his nerve. If your parents invested in a 40' boat I would hope to think they are a little better than just novices.

To answer what are good seas and winds...It's what you were just in. Once you get used to it you might even want more!

You might want to start getting concerned if you end up like this....
Attached Thumbnails
novice question seas/ swells/winds and kids.. pleasure sailing ONLY...-fying-cat.jpg  
__________________
2000 Catalina 320
Previous:
1993 Macgregor 26S
1981 Hobie H16
19?? Sol Cat
19?? Penquin
Many, many power boats

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Life should be an adventure, not a guided tour!
Not all of us in the herd are sheep.

Last edited by swampcreek; 08-09-2010 at 10:37 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-09-2010
deniseO30's Avatar
Move over Joan Rivers!
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 5,804
Thanks: 51
Thanked 70 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
Dad is on a ego trip, anyone that poo poos their guest's concerns should not be on the helm. (I'm harsh about such things) Do not go with him or take the kids unless he absolutely respects your concerns. 10-15 winds behind you can make a very uncomfortable ride for the uninitiated. If the seas were "following" it would really not be fun for a newbie.

You would have had a much nicer ride if Dad had reefed the main (assuming he even knows how), and used a smaller jib, did some "real" sailing with,simple tacks or a long reach, (sailing one way with the wind across the boat) while keeping the boat stable thereby letting you and the kids someday get the "feel" of being on a sailboat. The trip was about you, his guests, not him.


ps: never assume anyone knows how to sail just because they have a very expensive large, well equipped boat. I've seen little 22ft boats out sailing in winds that had most 30ft and over crusiers running back to the marina. Why? it's all about experience.
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by deniseO30; 08-09-2010 at 10:42 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-09-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
mrsriley72 is on a distinguished road
Red face

thank you, all.
@Denisee: he did respect me and took us in when I got uncomfortable... it's just that I was told it was nothing to have worried about. My reason for posting here is bc he is a newbie, and I am a know-nothing and I wondered if he was correct. From the other two posts here, it sounds like maube he is right and I am having a bit of an over-reaction... (can't help myself bc I am a total novice!) I think i could have handled it fine... it was tolerable... what "got" to me was worry that it would get worse if we headed out further into the Bay proper. Also, I am one of those over-protective moms.
He sailed with jib only. The boat was totally stable once under sail, with some small heel and wind at our back, sailing toward shore with tode coming to high tide. It was being under motor and heading out that caused me so much grief, talk about rock and roll! I don't know what "reef the main" means, so I dont know if he did that.
@swampcreek: Narrgansett Bay, RI. My dad's experience level: first boat, fist summer. My dad's intelligence=mensan. He's smart as a whip, but a sailing newbie. Had a few lessons, bought the boat and out he went. He loves it.
Bottom line: sounds like it's all me, and I need to learn more, experience a bit and maybe RELAX! I just wanted to ask and make sure no one said "heck no, 3 feet is too rough for kids!" Doesnt sound like anyone is saying that though----------- I think maybe a few rides WITHOUT kids so I can get the hang of it?

Last edited by mrsriley72; 08-09-2010 at 11:19 PM. Reason: typos
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-09-2010
deniseO30's Avatar
Move over Joan Rivers!
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 5,804
Thanks: 51
Thanked 70 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
Eh... Still, being smart doesn't mean he knows what he's doing. I just don't know that 10-15 on a new england bay is all that good for anyone new.
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-10-2010
dhays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: University Place, WA
Posts: 626
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
dhays is on a distinguished road
Well Motherof3, being nervous on a sailboat the first time out is not unusual. Add to the normal jitters the realization that your Dad is a novice himself and I think it is normal for you to be a bit nervous. The conditions you describe are fine for the boat, so I wouldn't worry about that.

For you to be able to go sailing with your Dad is a great opportunity, and an even better opportunity for your kids. It is a wonderful opportunity for your kids to spend some great time with your Dad over the next decade or so. My own kids loved being on the boat with their Grandparents, and now that my father is gone, it is a memory that is dear to them. My next boat will likely be named "Legacy" as a result.

However, you do need to be comfortable. If you have the chance to take some sailing lessons yourself it would make you much more confident and comfortable. Even better, your two older kids are the perfect age to learn to sail themselves. There may be some yacht clubs that have junior sailng programs that your kids might be able to participate in to learn to sail. Granddad just might want to pick up the tab as well. :-)

Dave
__________________
47*20'11.7" N
122*35'20.8" W
S/V Legacy, Catalina 400 MkII, Hull #328
My Blog on
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-10-2010
Water Lover
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Mexico, USA (Heron, Elephant Butte lakes); Arizona (Lake Pleasant)
Posts: 677
Thanks: 3
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 4
rgscpat is on a distinguished road
Yes, you definitely should learn more about sailing, and so should your older kids. The more you and they know the more comfortable you'll be. To be fair to your dad, it's really hard for a lot of skippers (unless they are very good teachers by nature or training) to know how new sailors such as you and your kids may feel.

Also, I really believe that a skipper shouldn't take a family out without having a "mate" on board who can help the kids learn more and serve as a back-up.

And, I think the whole experience would be far more positive for the kids if they feel that they can be part of making the boat work and they know why things are the way there are on board. Just going on boat rides can be boring or scary but being part of making things happen is so much more satisfying and (dare I say it) empowering for young people.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-10-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
While I agree with Denise about your father's attitude, I would point out that a 40' sailboat in those conditions is really in little danger unless the captain is a complete idiot.

RGSCPat's suggestion of you and your kids learning more about sailing is a good one. This is for two reasons. First, you'll be more comfortable. Second, it would be a good thing to have at least the basics down in case something happens to your father when you're out.

I'd highly recommend you get Dave Seidman's book, The Complete Sailor and have you and your older kids read it. I'd also recommend you get it as a gift for your father, since he sounds like he's still on the steep part of the learning curve.... This way you, your kids and your father will be better able to communicate, and you can make going out on the boat a shared experience, rather than just being passive passengers.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-10-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: VA
Posts: 2,005
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 9
PalmettoSailor will become famous soon enough
I'll be the contrarian here and suggest that while the conditions experienced are no where near endangering the boat, they could indeed be too much for children and an inexperienced skipper.

What training has your Dad had? He obviously didn't do much to alleviate your fears. Could he handle a MOB situation quickly? Could anyone else handle the boat if it was the skipper overboard?

Its not a huge leap from 15 knots of wind to 20 knots and things will get "interesting" at those wind speeds. I think it would be a good idea to find out what training your Dad has had and either go on a day where the winds are 12 knots or less, or let your Dad get some more experience. If its his first season with his first boat, he doesn't have a depth of experience, though he may have a great deal of book knowledge. FWIW, I consider myself a neophyte skipper, after an ASA class, some personal training with a Captain, 5 years of ownership and 3 years crewing a 40' boat in club races. At this point I feel comfortable taking non sailor guests on weekend jaunts knowing between my wife and I we can keep them safe in any conditions we're likely to encounter.
__________________
PalmettoSailor
s/v Palmetto Moon
1991 Catalina 36
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sailing 40ft, 3 kids, new to sailing... worries Motherof3 Cruising and Sailing with Children 0 08-09-2010 09:53 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:18 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012