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  #1  
Old 08-29-2010
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Low profile main halyard knot

With many changing over to all-rope halyards from rope/wire spliced ones, another decision that comes is whether or not to splice a shackle onto the line.

Tying halyards on is another option, but often the length of the knot will interfere with a full hoist. However tying them on avoids the cost, hassle and potential whack on the head from a shackle and is easy to do. It also allows you to end-for-end the halyard, or simply trim a foot or so off a few times if wear or chafe becomes an issue.(For this reason it's not a bad idea to make it several feet too long from the start.)

Here's a knot we've been using for years without issue, and it's lower profile than any shackle. I was told it's called an "Aussie bowline" (sorry TD..) but I'm sure it has another more proper name somewhere. As the sequence indicates it's essentially a figure eight and a half hitch. The "loop" locks/chokes on much like a bowline's. I like to keep the tail a bit long and pointing aft so that the stopper is not strained, it can't get jammed against the mast in any way, and is easy to undo.





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Old 08-29-2010
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If the line will pass through the Head Gromet twice you could use a Studding Sail bend.
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Old 08-29-2010
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Hmmmmm..........
I re-did all my halyards this spring and kept the shackles, as I never thought of it, any other way. I do know on my main the aluminum pieces on the top of my mailsail would probably cut the halyard up, but they could be worked with a file to be smooth.
But what do you really save here? On my 20 ft. boat......my shackles weigh nothing. They are tied with a bowline knot, and don't keep the sail from hitting the top of the mast....
At least I don't think they do..................?

I'll have to check the next time I hoist the main.
There's always a different way to do the same thing...keeps you thinking.
Best of luck
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Low Profile Halyard Bend

My solution to the same problem was a bend with zero drift (the headboard itself can jam up against the block). If your halyard can pass through the cringle twice but not thrice, the folowing has served me well. Pass a bight through the cringle and then take the bitter end around and pass it through the bight and snug up. Works just like a loop and toggle.

Geohan
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Old 08-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
With many changing over to all-rope halyards from rope/wire spliced ones, another decision that comes is whether or not to splice a shackle onto the line.

Tying halyards on is another option, but often the length of the knot will interfere with a full hoist. However tying them on avoids the cost, hassle and potential whack on the head from a shackle and is easy to do. It also allows you to end-for-end the halyard, or simply trim a foot or so off a few times if wear or chafe becomes an issue.(For this reason it's not a bad idea to make it several feet too long from the start.)

Here's a knot we've been using for years without issue, and it's lower profile than any shackle. I was told it's called an "Aussie bowline" (sorry TD..) but I'm sure it has another more proper name somewhere. As the sequence indicates it's essentially a figure eight and a half hitch. The "loop" locks/chokes on much like a bowline's. I like to keep the tail a bit long and pointing aft so that the stopper is not strained, it can't get jammed against the mast in any way, and is easy to undo.
I don't know...some people...one rabbits on about how beautiful is the area in which they live, pays constant compliments on their photographic skills, all in all be a throughoughly nice chap and what do you get ? Abuse and snide comments. tsk tsk tsk....

As we carry on with the various upgrades and general maintenance to our old girl we have had some fabulous simple, cost effective ways to improve the sailing experience. Coincidentally a fellow VDS owner (Sailing Anarchy's "AllPissandWind") also uses Fast's method and suggested it to us a while back. From him also came that DIY preventer and for headsail sheets, a Dutch Shackle.
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Old 08-29-2010
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I would recommend a buntline hitch instead... but I would point out that buntline hitches can become very difficult to untie if they're left in for any significant period of time, especially if left loaded for long periods of time.
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Old 08-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I would recommend a buntline hitch instead... but I would point out that buntline hitches can become very difficult to untie if they're left in for any significant period of time, especially if left loaded for long periods of time.
.. and there's the thing with this "what-ever-it-is"... it's easy to release much like a bowline - and this is, of course, a line that can get quite heavily loaded from time to time!
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1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

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