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Old 10-03-2010
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Mid boom vs end boom sheeting

Base on the sail shape and sail efficiency, Which one is better? I would think that end boom sheeting is better, because we can have a finer control over the traveler. Not sure if my thinking is right?
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Old 10-03-2010
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From the simple extent you are talking, yes, end boom is better. It also take less energy if that is the right word to change the boom setting.

I am assuming you are dealing with lines and sheave. It may be a 4-1 end vs needing a 6-1 if mid boom to easily move the boom.

I am not familiar with the German system. but it seems to be a pseudo mid boom, with the main sheet line fed back to the helm area and winches, to make it easier to operate.

If cruising, folks seem to like the cabin top, but I personally do not like it, because in shifty/gusty winds, and you are SH'ing the boat, it is hard to adjust the boom in gusts etc. Where as an end boom, is near the helm, so one can sail and adjust at the same time.

Marty
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Old 10-03-2010
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Its like BLT said.

End boom requires less purchase, but often is in the cockpit. The location and length of the traveller is also important. Many 'Bendy types' (Bene's, etc) have light, high aspect (in mast) mains and so have lightish gear for the mid boom sheeting. All aimed at keeping a big entertainment area clear in the cockpit.

Mid Boom traveller and thus the sheeting requires greater purchase and lines back to the cockpit. (Each block/guide will increase resistance as well as the chance for a 'kinked' sheet to jam - in which case you would have to leave the cockpit to clear it)

What I am trying to say is to seriously look at it, if you wish to change the sheeting position.
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Last edited by St Anna; 10-03-2010 at 01:30 PM.
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Old 10-03-2010
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Thanks Mates. Just make sure I take all this in. The end boom sheeting only have the mechanical advantage. As far as sail shape is concerned, both is the same???
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I'd say sail shape control will not significantly differ with varying mainsheet setups, but the purchase required for the same degree of control will vary. An end-of-boom system has the best inherent mechanical advantage. The stiffness of the boom section probably plays a role too.

Hand-in-hand with the reduced power of same-tackle midboom sheeting come some other issues.. in most cases mid boom sheeting is led forward and then aft to the cabintop. This is often an awkward location, both from a convenience/reach perspective and from the fact that now you're often working within the confines of a dodger. This also impedes your visibility and sightlines for trimming.

The so-called German sheeting gets around this by bringing the sheet back down the decks to the coamings near the helmsman (often double-ended for access from either side) This allows reduced purchase requirements and improved speed assuming you'll be leading the ends to a convenient 2-speed winch.

The other aspect of mid vs end boom is the strength of the whole setup.. mid boom sheeting is more prone to (admittedly rare) boom failure, esp on a hard, unexpected jibe. The further forward the attachment the weaker the whole thing may be.. this is esp true if the modification has been made (perhaps to accomodate a dodger) without the required reinforcement of the boom at the attachment point.

One other comment.. the power of the mainsheet is most important close hauled.. after that (as the sheet is eased) the improved speed of a low power tackle is handier, except when jibing in a serious breeze due to the difficulty of handling the sudden change in forces. Once the sheet is eased, then the vang is as important as anything else for setting leech tension and controlling sail shape. IMO a good, powerful and easy-to-adjust vang is a critical sail trim and safety item.
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Old 10-03-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
...
I am not familiar with the German system. but it seems to be a pseudo mid boom, with the main sheet line fed back to the helm area and winches, to make it easier to operate.

...
Marty
Hey Marty,

Most of the European cruiser racers bigger than 34ft are coming now with German sheeting system as standard (and with end boom sheating). The lines go along the boom to the front and then back to the winches.

Regards

Paulo
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Paulo,

Thanks for the better description if you will. I know it is different, you can order on a lot of the bigger as you say, 34'ish foot European built boats. Frankly it looks interesting, maybe easier to operate than a purchase system.

I am sure, just like mid vs end boom sheeting, the German system has some plus and minus's to it too. With it being the end user needing to decide which +- is for them.

Marty
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Marty,

In my opinion in what concerns a end boom sheeting, German sheeting is better on a 40 ft(or bigger) if you have a racing crew. The cockpit is big enough and the control of the boom (on the winches) is not too near the wheel. More space for moving around and more easy control. But if you are a solo sailor you will want the boom control right near the wheel (where you can reach it) and in this case you will not want German sheeting.

I think that they don't use German sheeting on 34ft and smaller cruiser racers because the cockpit space is not big enough to have effective maneuveur space for genoa control and boom control on the side winches (I mean two guys working at the same time on each side away from the wheel).

If you have a mid boom sheeting and if you are a solo sailor you should want German sheeting, especially if you can have 2 winches on each side because you can bring the boom control to a winch nearer you (using the other for the genoa), instead of using the ones on the top of the cabin.

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 10-03-2010 at 07:45 PM.
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Old 10-03-2010
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Gentlemen, I am confused. How does the German system move the traveler?

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It doesn't.... It's just another way to run the MAINSHEET. With mid boom sheeting's normal shortfalls (low purchase, sheet winch on cabintop) this system, if led to an area close to the helmsman (eg seldom used secondary winches) it deals with those shortcomings. Obviously it can be rigged regardless of whether the sheet attachment point is mid boom or end boom.

The choice (at the design stage) of mid or end boom attachment is usually driven by companionway access, cockpit comfort and obstruction, or dodger accommodation.. and it necessarily dictates traveler location as well (and vice-versa)

If by "move the traveler" you mean adjustment, that is, of course, a whole other set of tackle.

I'd also like to qualify all this by saying that by midboom sheeting I'm mostly referring to cabintop travelers forward of the dodger/companionway.
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Last edited by Faster; 10-03-2010 at 08:04 PM.
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