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  #21  
Old 10-19-2010
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As others have said, mostly you die.

However there are exceptions read the Prue Nash story here CLICKY

I have recently bought a boat with a midships ladder which is stowed on deck while sailing. There is no way I can get back onboard without the ladder and high on the to do list is a set of permanent rear steps with a pull down telescopic section which I can operate from the water. But this only works at anchor or when the boat is drifting VERY SLOWLY.
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  #22  
Old 10-19-2010
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Robert Gainer, a former member who passed away a few years ago, had a similar mishap, where he fell off his boat, yet managed—by a miracle—to get back aboard.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #23  
Old 10-19-2010
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Oh Jeff... dont be a curmudgeon... im sure all the ladies thought you were a sex-a-genarian back then too......

hmmmm TQA...wonder if there would be a way to teather to the swim ladder so that overboard=telescoping deployment, and you would still be hooked to her? the snaps/velcro/whatever keeps the ladder up (if a flip down model) would have to be pressure sensitive enough to pop... just brainstorming
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Last edited by QuickMick; 10-19-2010 at 04:20 PM.
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  #24  
Old 10-19-2010
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Iirc

I think alcohol was involved in that mishap. Maybe hormones too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Unfortunately, this is all too common. Four people on a a sailboat owned by one of their parents did this not too long ago. The two women survived miraculously, the two men didn't. The boat wasn't anchored. They didn't have any PFDs on.... and all four decided to go swimming... Darwin award winners...
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I went out solo a couple of times, in nice weather, light winds and warm water. I did wear an inflatable pfd. I also pulled a 100ft floating line behind me, with a small float attached at the end.

The line was attached to the rear starboard cleat, it ran back around and over my tiller, then exited the starboard side, through the rear pushpit upright.

If I had fallen over, I would have a chance to grab the line, which should have put the tiller hard to starboard and hopefully she would have rounded up.

Hey, better than just waving goodbye. A waterproof handheld VHF would have also been nice.
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  #26  
Old 10-19-2010
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Hey,

I'm not trying to be cute here, but doesn't where you are sailing have a major impact on the severity of falling off or not? For example, I sail in the Long Island Sound. I am never more than 10 miles from shore and usually less than 5 miles. Most of the time there are many other boats around and the water is not that cold. When I single hand I wear an inflatable PFD, hand held VHF and SPOT messenger device.

I imagine that if I fall off and can't catch the boat (I don't believe I will be able to and won't spend a lot of time or energy trying), I will pop the inflatable and then issue a mayday on channel 16. If I don't get a response in a short time, I'll trigger the SPOT emergency button and start swimming for land.

While I don't think the experience would be pleasant, I do believe I would survive.

Barry
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Old 10-19-2010
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Depends a lot on the air and water temps. Also, don't rely on the SPOT, since it won't work if it is in the water.
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Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
Hey,

I'm not trying to be cute here, but doesn't where you are sailing have a major impact on the severity of falling off or not? For example, I sail in the Long Island Sound. I am never more than 10 miles from shore and usually less than 5 miles. Most of the time there are many other boats around and the water is not that cold. When I single hand I wear an inflatable PFD, hand held VHF and SPOT messenger device.

I imagine that if I fall off and can't catch the boat (I don't believe I will be able to and won't spend a lot of time or energy trying), I will pop the inflatable and then issue a mayday on channel 16. If I don't get a response in a short time, I'll trigger the SPOT emergency button and start swimming for land.

While I don't think the experience would be pleasant, I do believe I would survive.

Barry
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #28  
Old 10-19-2010
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they sell emergency boarding ladders you can clip to a stanchion or your toe rail so if you fall off you can still get back on

Wichard Emergency Boarding Ladder

wont help much if you arent right next to it when the boat is underway but it sure would come in handy if you were stopped and fell off while single handing.
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  #29  
Old 10-19-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
Hey,

I'm not trying to be cute here, but doesn't where you are sailing have a major impact on the severity of falling off or not? For example, I sail in the Long Island Sound. I am never more than 10 miles from shore and usually less than 5 miles. Most of the time there are many other boats around and the water is not that cold. When I single hand I wear an inflatable PFD, hand held VHF and SPOT messenger device.

I imagine that if I fall off and can't catch the boat (I don't believe I will be able to and won't spend a lot of time or energy trying), I will pop the inflatable and then issue a mayday on channel 16. If I don't get a response in a short time, I'll trigger the SPOT emergency button and start swimming for land.

While I don't think the experience would be pleasant, I do believe I would survive.

Barry
On the one hand, I agree. Unless you're way out, your chances are pretty good...

IF...

you stay afloat. The PFD is the absolute key.

I remember talking about this quite a bit in another thread here:

How "afraid" should we be of sailing?

It was based on a USCG report of boating deaths in the US. It was absolutely amazing how quickly and consistently people drown without a PFD.

Statistically speaking, sailing is not very dangerous. But you always need to float.
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  #30  
Old 10-19-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
On the one hand, I agree. Unless you're way out, your chances are pretty good...

IF...

you stay afloat. The PFD is the absolute key.


Statistically speaking, sailing is not very dangerous. But you always need to float.
For sure.

I have posted this site before. If you want to know why you should wear your pfd, this should convince you.

http://www.coldwaterbootcamp.com/
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