Wooden Boat, What does it take to maintain one? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-24-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Oceanside CA
Posts: 684
Thanks: 3
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jephotog is on a distinguished road
Wooden Boat, What does it take to maintain one?

What does it take to maintain a wooden boat? I love sailing and woodworking but don't think I would ever want a wooden boat, or at least one that lived in the water. I really enjoy looking at them at the wooden boat festivals I have been to though, but somehow have developed a fear of what it would take to fix up and maintain a wooden boat.

Some recent posts here got me thinking. Someone with a wood boat wanted a bigger, newer wood boat if he had the money. In another thread someone suggested a wood boat as an alternative to another. In my mind the boat being wood made it a complete other type of beast. In reality, how much more work is owning a wooden boat?
__________________
Jordan
West Wight Potter 14 "Lemon Drop"
Oceanside CA
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-24-2010
MarkCK's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 475
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
MarkCK is on a distinguished road
A wooden boat will take every bit of free time that you have and then you will still have a long list of projects you will never get around to. Thats to keep it in Bristol condition of course. If you have the funds to pay someone else to do it the task becomes much much easier.

Now if you dont mind your boat having a little character it will still require a lot more work than a fiberglass one, but it will become much more manageable.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-24-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Oceanside CA
Posts: 684
Thanks: 3
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jephotog is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkCK View Post
A wooden boat will take every bit of free time that you have
Thats the impression I got. Figured wooden boat ownership was as much of a hobby as sailing the boat is.

What I am wondering in particular is what more needs to be done to keep the boat afloat?

Pull the boat annually?
Topside paint yearly?
Scrub the decks with a holystone?

What are the different maintenance regimens that make owning a wood boat so much more work?
__________________
Jordan
West Wight Potter 14 "Lemon Drop"
Oceanside CA
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-24-2010
imagine2frolic's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 6
imagine2frolic is on a distinguished road
Depends on the shape one would take ownership of a wooden boat. It also depends on what type of wooden boat it is. Mine is all wood, and I would build yet another, and larger. Then again it is cold molded.

Go to the wooden boat forum, and you will get an idea of what it takes.......i2f
__________________
20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


BORROWED, No single one of us is as smart as all of us!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-24-2010
cormeum's Avatar
48' wood S&S yawl
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 421
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
cormeum is on a distinguished road
For us it works about to about 40 hours a year. Keeping up the hull and brightwork is less time consuming than systems work- which is common to all older boats. Projects are projects and in our experience, we all have to deal with them- at least we don't get blistering and soggy cores. Each material has its issues.

Were I to put wood boat maintenance in a nutshell, it's that if you don't want to amount of work to get out of hand, you have to get to it right away. In that regard, glass is somewhat more forgiving. But if you keep on top of it, it's not that much work. Coat of varnish every year, paint every other year, etc.

I think that before Mark CK pontificates, he should get some experience
__________________
"Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity." - Robert A.Heinlein

Last edited by cormeum; 10-24-2010 at 04:07 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-24-2010
deniseO30's Avatar
Lies about her age
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 5,453
Thanks: 50
Thanked 53 Times in 45 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
Wooden boats and how they are built has allot of bearing on how much care they need. There is now.. I'd say in the last 30 years or so.. a growing number of wooden boats that are built and or restored with high end materials. They are best described as being in a state of "arrested" decomposition. Also, there are builders that build hulls in wood and epoxy. some are called cold molded, some are strip planked, which becomes a composite hull, very stable, strong, and rot resistant.

Some Old (and new) traditionally built boats are planked.. like the planks on a hardwood or softwood floor only longer.. this is called carvel planking. it is built on purpose to have "gaps" in the seams.. which have cotton or oakum wedged in. the seams were then sealed with tar or putty in the old days, now with high tech caulking. Carvel planking is the most fear producing method of hull planking also.. as it's the kind that needs to "swell" or be kept wet. this type of build also is the worse looking when it drys out from being out of the water.

The other type of planking looks like the sides of a house. It's called "lapstrake" the planks were often riveted and screwed along the edges with tar or caulk in between overlaps. On newer boats that look the same many are are being built in what is called "glued lapstrake" and the strakes are made of plywood.. very stable, strong and very beautiful to see when finished with varnish.

Cormeum is spot on about how little time his boat needs, because his boat has been well loved and cared for I'm sure.

The most important parts to fail in larger wooden boats are, the deadwood, stern post and or stem in the bow. Keel and keel bolts are problems also, Ribs (called timbers) are often easy to repair in the boat. A method called sistering.. about the same as used in building houses.

Big old wooden boats are left to rot.. Big old fiberglass boats are left also.. except, everything but the hull rots!

Study, research, and look at many many boats before you buy.. often you will find them free. I just found a "free" boat. 23ft full keel 82 years old with carvel planking and iron keel, I won't be adopting her but I'm trying to find a home for her.


Anyone should know their limitations when it comes to old boats. glass or wood. So much "stuff" is very costly. Even if the boat itself it well restored or maintained. The cost of sails,spars, rigging, engines, systems, etc are why some people build boats and never finish them.
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-24-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 97
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
alanr77 is on a distinguished road
Having spent the first 25 years of my life around wooden boats, meaning riding in them as a child, then helping my dad work on his and then maintaining my own, my answer is A LOT. For every four months we used our Mahogany Chris Crafts, Constellations and Romers, we/I would spend twice that sanding and varnishing. They sure were beautiful though. If you have a dedicated passion for them, they are great. If you just think they are pretty-look at someone else's..... AR
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-24-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Wooden Boat, What does it take to maintain one? Passion.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-24-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Milton, DE
Posts: 589
Thanks: 2
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Flybyknight is on a distinguished road
My first boat was a 26' 1928 Chris Craft run about. That was in the early 50s'.
All I can say is If you can keep the bottom from dry rotting, then all else is
nice like when you stop hitting your head with a hammer.

Dick
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-24-2010
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,071
Thanks: 31
Thanked 68 Times in 61 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
Wooden boats loosely fall into three categories;
1. There are high maintenance wooden boats, (planked)and then
2. There are lower maintenance wooden boats,(cold moulded), and
3. Cheap or free wooden boats that will break your heart.

but one thing they all have in common- all wooden boats require passion. A wooden boat will own YOU, not vice versa. if you have wooden boat stewardship in your heart, and you understand that there are no acceptable shortcuts in a varnish schedule, that you really do need a caulking mallet to properly caulk your boat, if you understand that it takes as long as it takes to take up, then you might be one to carry forth the legacy. A wooden boat will take over a large part of your life, and you will be a better person for it. if you worry about how much time maintenance will require, if you'd rather be sailing than caretaking, if you are a procrastinator who won't fix something until it is well and truly broken/rotten/gone, then you aren't ready for a wooden boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Average cost to Maintain your Boat, Please.. Superpickle Gear & Maintenance 32 12-24-2009 11:17 AM
Free Boat? Wooden, hmm, Just come get it? hmm.. Valdensule Boat Review and Purchase Forum 10 06-26-2009 10:12 AM
Wooden boat maintenance drsm Gear & Maintenance 8 10-15-2007 10:03 PM
Wooden Kit Boat Cruisingdad General Discussion (sailing related) 20 10-11-2007 09:34 AM
Small Wooden Boat Kalmia41 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 2 01-07-2007 09:24 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:05 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012