Affect of lightning in open water - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


View Poll Results: Have you been *in open water with lightning hitting the water*? If so what happened?
Have never been in open water with lightning striking the water. 9 31.03%
Have been many times (open water AND lightning hitting water) and did NOT get hit 11 37.93%
Have been many times (open water AND lightning hitting water) and DID get hit 2 6.90%
Have been once (open water AND lightning hitting water) and did NOT get hit 6 20.69%
Have been once (open water AND lightning hitting water) and DID get hit 1 3.45%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-03-2010
Bene505's Avatar
Glad I found Sailnet
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3,615
Thanks: 5
Thanked 40 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Bene505 will become famous soon enough Bene505 will become famous soon enough
Have you been sailing away from land when lightning was hitting the water?

You are offshore or away from land and a front is approaching you. What are the chances of getting hit? That's what I'm trying to figure out with this poll.

Yes, there is another lightning polls out there, but my concern is not about a vendor's product but the risk of getting hit overall.

Note that the first question is BOTH lightning hitting the water AND in open water. If only one is true but not both, please answer that you haven't been in that circumstance. Otherwise please elaborate.

I'm expecting most sailnet-ers will answer that they haven't been in that situation. No matter, there will be some who have.

Regards,
Brad
__________________
.
.
Great minds discuss ideas;
Average minds discuss events;
Small minds discuss people.
.
The best minds discuss buckets. I don't know why. It's a mystery!
.

Last edited by Bene505; 11-03-2010 at 01:42 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-03-2010
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,954
Thanks: 80
Thanked 217 Times in 209 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
Liz and Andy Copeland out of Vancouver BC were struck off the coast of Africa in open water on their Bene First 38 during their circumnavigation. No one was hurt but virtually all their electronics were fried.

A link to their books:
Liza & Andy Copeland - Cruising Authors
The episode is described in her book "Still Cruising"
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-03-2010
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Mansfield TX
Posts: 66
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
FlyNavy is on a distinguished road
To explain my "Have been in and didn't get hit response." I may have been in a bit different situation than what you're looking for.
Spent my open water lightening time onboard aircraft carriers. The ship never seemed to get hit, anymore than any random 15 square acres of space.
With several cumulative years at sea, I cannot recall any plane, piece of equipment or even the flight deck ever being hit while transiting through several mighty thunderstorms.
We seemed to like to hide under them back when we were more concerned about the Soviets knowing our where-abouts.
__________________
'79 San Juan 7.7
Joe Pool Lake
DFW area TX
Sailing year 'round
(Not up North)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-03-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 395
Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 7
noelex77 is on a distinguished road
The chance of getting hit by lightening is remote. In open water without any other high structures around the risk is probably higher, but 5 or 10X a remote risk is still an event that is unlikely to happen.

5 lotto tickets gives you a 5x higher chance of winning, but you would be a fool to quit your job on the strength of this increased chance.

I have been struck by lightening, but at anchor. This make sense, because I spend much more time at anchor than in open water.

The closest I have come in open water was a bolt that hit about 50 yards away. I was at the helm at the time and shouted down something like "God that hit the water only 50 yards away" (There may have been a couple rude words that I have edited out)
A friend who was a guest at the time (sheltering down below) said "That’s good It sounded closer than that"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 11-03-2010
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,937
Thanks: 27
Thanked 52 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Liz and Andy Copeland out of Vancouver BC were struck off the coast of Africa in open water on their Bene First 38 during their circumnavigation. No one was hurt but virtually all their electronics were fried.

A link to their books:
Liza & Andy Copeland - Cruising Authors
The episode is described in her book "Still Cruising"
Good reference. Their standing rigging was also compromised.

Check out Appendix D of Still Cruising.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 11-04-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
radovix is on a distinguished road
Out of Norfolk

Lost autopilot, radio and echo sounder.

2000$ damage.

No one was hurt
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 11-04-2010
svHyLyte's Avatar
Old as Dirt!
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tampa Bay Area
Posts: 2,791
Thanks: 15
Thanked 113 Times in 107 Posts
Rep Power: 6
svHyLyte is on a distinguished road
We have been at sea several (tho' not "Many") times during lightning storms with water strikes around us. It scared the heck out of us but we were lucky. Never the less, even a near by strike is enough to screw up electronics--e.g. we've had to replace our wind instrument mast head unit several times due to near misses. When confronted with this situation, we routinely put our portable GPSMap 76 in the Oven of our stove in hopes that it will survive any EMP effects.

FWIW...
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 11-04-2010
PorFin's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,340
Thanks: 1
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 8
PorFin is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
When confronted with this situation, we routinely put our portable GPSMap 76 in the Oven of our stove in hopes that it will survive any EMP effects.
Same here. The oven becomes a makeshift Faraday cage for not only a handheld GPS, but also the handheld VHF, cellphones, laptop, etc. It gets a little cramped in there, but we make everything fit. So far we've never had lightning stikes close enough to prove the efficacy of the oven as a Faraday cage, but it can't hurt and may make a life saving difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 11-05-2010
LarryandSusanMacDonald's Avatar
SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Permanent Vacation
Posts: 600
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
LarryandSusanMacDonald will become famous soon enough
We've been close enough more than once but not 'many' times to feel the hair on our bodies stand up. Have seen it hit the water closer than a quarter of a mile, more than once. Once we were at anchor on the Bahama banks - 12 feet of water and out of sight of land. It's a bit unnerving setting next to what is essentially a 55 foot lightning rod with lightning hitting all around. We were lucky.
__________________
Saltwater Suzi and Cap'n Larry


"A sailboat is a fickle mistress. You’ve got to buy her things. You’ve got to understand everything about her. What you don’t know she’ll use against you." -Captain Larry


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 11-05-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 665
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
lancelot9898 is on a distinguished road
Over the past 25 years I've had two near misses. One was while at anchor and the other was in the marina. The marina miss took out more electronics, but the one item affected both times was the atomatic antenna tunner for the SSB. I've been in open water during thunderstorms and had no problems or had any near misses. One time comeing back into port at night with thunderstorms and wind happening, I even wanted to see lightening in order to see any anchored boats that might be in my path.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how to open water tank inspection port rmeador Gear & Maintenance 19 10-27-2010 09:32 AM
Open Water-Adrift (the movie) T37Chef General Discussion (sailing related) 6 06-28-2010 06:59 PM
Browsing for an open water boat Crunch Boat Review and Purchase Forum 20 07-24-2008 04:19 PM
J24 in open water joeymarc General Discussion (sailing related) 9 06-14-2007 05:57 AM
How do I moor in open water? Real Ale Learning to Sail 4 11-13-2003 09:08 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:05 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.