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-   -   Running the outboard out of the water for 30 seconds (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/70918-running-outboard-out-water-30-seconds.html)

Bene505 12-28-2010 12:15 PM

Running the outboard out of the water for 30 seconds
 
Does anyone know if it's ok to run an outboard engine out of the water? I'm talking for 30 seconds just to "turn over" the gas in the carburator to help prevent it turning into shallack. Also to put oil back on the cylinder walls.

The engine is a 20hp Tohatsu that's hanging off the stern of our boat. It's about 30 degrees here. I figure it will take some time for the internal engine parts to get hot.

Gratuitous winter picture of the outboard
http://hallmont.com/pics/sailnet%20p...nowy%20day.jpg

Plan B is to lift it off the pushpit and let it hang into the water off one of the davits. At 117 pounds, it's not something I like to do too often if I can avoid it.

Plan C is to get the ear-muff looking device to clamp on the water intake and run the engine for longer periods of time. It's not easy to find flowing water here though. I'd probably hook it up to our washdown pump when the temp get's above 32.

After last winter, when it was run completely out of fuel and stored in our warm furnace room, it took the whole summer to run right again. I'm looking to avoid that by running it periodically throughout the winter.

So will it hurt the engine to run it for 30 seconds without water???

Regards,
Brad

tommays 12-28-2010 12:27 PM

It KILLS the water pump in about 11 seconds more or less

MUCH better to use a tall 5 gallon bucket or the correct ear muffs to keep the pump wet as it will self drain if the motor is level

IF you winterize it and drain the fuel bowl there is no need to do anything over the winter BUT the motor would like a cover :) as it helps a lot with the UV also

Most do have a drain screw for this reason

svHyLyte 12-28-2010 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bene505 (Post 681084)
Does anyone know if it's ok to run an outboard engine out of the water? I'm talking for 30 seconds just to "turn over" the gas in the carburator to help prevent it turning into shallack. Also to put oil back on the cylinder walls.

The engine is a 20hp Tohatsu that's hanging off the stern of our boat. It's about 30 degrees here. I figure it will take some time for the internal engine parts to get hot.

Gratuitous winter picture of the outboard


Plan B is to lift it off the pushpit and let it hang into the water off one of the davits. At 117 pounds, it's not something I like to do too often if I can avoid it.

Plan C is to get the ear-muff looking device to clamp on the water intake and run the engine for longer periods of time. It's not easy to find flowing water here though. I'd probably hook it up to our washdown pump when the temp get's above 32.

After last winter, when it was run completely out of fuel and stored in our warm furnace room, it took the whole summer to run right again. I'm looking to avoid that by running it periodically throughout the winter.

So will it hurt the engine to run it for 30 seconds without water???

Regards,
Brad

Brad--

While the engine may remain cool due to the temps, the impellor in your water-pump won't be too happy. Why not pull your plugs and spray fogging oil into the cyclinders and then give the starting line a few tugs. Absent plugs, the engine will turn over easily distributing the oil on the cyclinder walls then reinstall the plugs. On that motor you should also be able to pull the fuel bowl quite easily. Just dump it out and wipe it dry with a lint-free cloth.

FWIW...

sailjunkie 12-28-2010 12:47 PM

Very good comments from the other posters, especially the concerns about the impeller. If it was my motor, I would opt for plan C.

mitchbrown 12-28-2010 01:03 PM

I have found that most of the carburators on these outboards drain when you tilt the engine all the way up. the gas usually just runs out into the engine cowling where it will evaporate.

Bene505 12-28-2010 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tommays (Post 681087)
It KILLS the water pump in about 11 seconds more or less

OUCH!

Quote:

MUCH better to use a tall 5 gallon bucket...
Now that's a simple, effective, great idea. I love it!

Thanks everyone for the input.

Regards,
Brad

JKCatalina310 12-28-2010 02:15 PM

20 hp?
 
What kind of sailor has a 20 hp dinghy motor?

Siamese 12-28-2010 02:27 PM

Sounds like you're getting some good advice. I would question the value of starting the engine at all on the off season, for the purpose of keeping the fuel from turning to shellac. Outboards don't like old fuel. Turning it over won't make it any younger. Absolutely, at the end of the season, put the appropriate amount of fuel stabilizer in your fuel and run the engine long enough for the stabilized fuel to fill the carb. Very easy...very effective. Then, fogging the engine is a good idea, with the engine running, but not as important as the stabilizer.

And as the others have said, running it dry will destroy your impeller rather quickly.

The five gallon bucket will work well enough. In neutral :laugher

dabnis 12-28-2010 02:39 PM

All above comments are good, drain the carb. Running it "dry" may
leave a small amount of fuel which will evaporate and leave debris
which may be sucked up and clog jets the next time you start it. I
have used Berryman's B-12 fuel additive for many years in outboards,
motorcycles, generators, snowblowers and cars on an ongoing basis
with no fuel related problems. No affiliation and other products may
work as well? The most important thing is to drain the fuel bowl, and
yes, the impeller won't like being run dry.

Dabnis

tra 12-28-2010 03:53 PM

Ethanol
 
I'd like to add a comment about ethanol. My son has been employed in the marine industry for years and most of his repair work is fuel related. He advises using fuel additives specifically designed to protect engines from the potential corrosive effects of ethanol and is constantly checking for water in his own fuel. Any gasoline fueled equipment stored for long periods may be adversely impacted by ethanol.


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