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post #31 of 40 Old 01-05-2011
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You know you've been a nurse too long when you can look at that pic and hear yourself thinking, "Hmm, pizza sounds good."
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post #32 of 40 Old 01-05-2011
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Kudos to you Oma! You made yourself vulnerable to criticism, knowing you would get it, in order to spare others a similar experience. Would that we all had that virtue! Speedy healing, and thank you!
Sailboat Cruising in the 90s
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post #33 of 40 Old 01-05-2011
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Ouch Andre. I hope you make a complete and speedy recovery. I'd point out that windlasses and winches are a serious danger and several members, including Andre, have been injured by them in the last two years.

It is good idea to not have the windlass controls where you can reach them and still have your hands on the rode—since that's how most of the serious injuries involving a windlass occur.

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post #34 of 40 Old 01-05-2011 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
I agree (and I'm serious). You might want to edit your post to indicate whats comming in the photo. I don't have a weak stomach but I wasn't quite prepared for that! I think an "anchor winch" is a Windlass BTW. As you now know, fingers don't belong near winches or a windlass. You're very lucky you got your hand back. Did you figure out why the windlass woudn't shut off?
Actually a windlass is just one form of anchor winch, there are others (capstan comes to mind).

Haven't got back to the boat to check the windlass yet, will report findings in due course. I suspect a dodgy relay.

BTW, thanks everyone for your commiserations - my stupidity doesn't really deserve them. The finger was put back together and it was checked by the surgeon yesterday and it's looking good.

SD, the problem is that it would have made no difference in my case where the controls are/were, the winch was running uncontrollably. A simple intelligent decision was all that was really necessary.


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post #35 of 40 Old 01-05-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
Actually a windlass is just one form of anchor winch, there are others (capstan comes to mind).

Haven't got back to the boat to check the windlass yet, will report findings in due course. I suspect a dodgy relay.

BTW, thanks everyone for your commiserations - my stupidity doesn't really deserve them. The finger was put back together and it was checked by the surgeon yesterday and it's looking good.
Good to hear... looked nasty...

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SD, the problem is that it would have made no difference in my case where the controls are/were, the winch was running uncontrollably. A simple intelligent decision was all that was really necessary.
True, but that advice wasn't really directed at you...more of a general observation for people who might be installing windlasses and looking at this thread and trying to avoid what happened to you....

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #36 of 40 Old 01-06-2011
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Ouch! Man, I can identify with that. I “popcorned” the end of my finger with a skill saw. No way to stitch it as the skin was just shredded and the meat was just exploded. I took the advise of a friend and it really worked out well for me. It took us about an hour but we carefully pieced it all back together, lathered it with Neosporin and taped it up. I changed the dressing every day and re applied the Neosporin each time. I did this until it was completely healed; I never let it get hard or develop any kind of a scab. It took about three months but today I have 100% feeling in that fingertip and the scar is barely visible.

That’s a really nasty looking wound and I hope your healing goes as well as mine. Keep that thing clean and keep it soft until it’s completely healed.

DB
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post #37 of 40 Old 01-06-2011
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Owwwwwwww!

Nasty, but you are very lucky. Stupid, yeah, but we've all done stupid stuff. And thanks for sharing if for no other reason than to reinforce what we *should* all know.

My favorite sailing saying is "If a sailboat was a factory, OSHA would shut it down". Pinch points alone make a boat a dangerous place to play.
(OSHA being the Occupational, Safety and Health Admin. ; the guys here in the States that enforce workplace safety)


I've just barely dinged my thumb and a finger on the tablesaw and bandsaw respectively; can hardly even see the white line it left. Hurt like hell though.

This past winter my Dad lopped off the nail and tip of two fingers w/a radial arm saw. No sewing THEM back together!
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post #38 of 40 Old 01-06-2011
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I was once man hauling a chain whilst under power in the pitch dark after having run aground.I had earlier in the day plodded through the mud with the anchor and chain to set it at the mouth of the shallow creek in which I was stranded.
Both under power and man hauling the boat came of the sandbank shot forwards and overran the chain which as I recall was somehow tangled in the pulpit.
I ended up with my hand wrapped between the chain and pulpit and had to release it using the hand.
My friend cut the power and as the boat drifted back the chain went slack.
Luckily didnt loose anything!
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post #39 of 40 Old 01-06-2011
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Reminds me a of a MayDay call I heard a couple of years ago. Seems as though the captain ran the anchor line back to a stern cleat and would release it from the helm. One of his crew happened to get his thumb wrapped around the line and had it severed in the process. They had the thumb on ice and were heading into port ASAP. No idea how his thumb turned out but it's a good reminder to keep your hands and feet away from any line that could possibly have tension on it. Something I always remind anyone on board while sailing.
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post #40 of 40 Old 01-06-2011
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Damn, things like that never happen when you see them coming. During my first winching session with my "new" boat I managed to tear the winch off its mounting, but remained personally uninjured. Hope your recovery is quick.
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