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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 01-07-2011
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We have used several kayaks while sailing. A relative's hobie sit on top is fine, but is pretty heavy to lug on deck and has turtled when towed. We now use a more traditional shaped kayak called a CLC wood duck (made form a stitch and glue kit). It is lighter, shorter, but has a big cockpit to make entering from the ladder OK. The spray skirt is nice to have in the chop. The added protection of a decked kayak is a plus in the NW where we sail. We also keep stearns inflatable kayak stowed on board so we both can explore. It has a inflatable bladder inside a fabric skin, similar to better quality white water inflatables. It is therefore more rigid than most and tracks ok with the included skeg. 2 rigid yaks or a double would be too much for our 30 ft boat. Even with 2 the load carrying capacity is small and I would not want to row out an anchor in a blow in any kayak.
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Old 01-07-2011
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We use the two-person inflatable kayak that West Marine sells (can't think of the name of it). We love it - easy to handle, tracks well in a cross-breeze, deflates into a suitcase and takes all of 5 minutes to inflate and launch.
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Old 01-07-2011
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Can you really get on and off a kayak from a sailboat? I have a tough enough time with the dinghy. Sorry for the hijack, thought the OP might want to consider your replies. Haven't done it myself, but can't figure how I would step on and sit down without awesome circus act balance.
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Old 01-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Can you really get on and off a kayak from a sailboat? I have a tough enough time with the dinghy. Sorry for the hijack, thought the OP might want to consider your replies. Haven't done it myself, but can't figure how I would step on and sit down without awesome circus act balance.
I have a dive ladder that extends two steps below the surface. I can step onto the lowest rung and sit side-ways on the kayak. It's a simple matter of lifting my legs onto the kayak and I'm off. The kayak is more than stable enough to do this. To re-board my boat I just reverse the process.

I'm pretty sure I could do the same thing with my boarding ladder, but, as it doesn't go quite as deep it would probably be a bit trickier but certainly do-able.
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Originally Posted by flyingwelshman View Post
I have a dive ladder that extends two steps below the surface. I can step onto the lowest rung and sit side-ways on the kayak. ....
Ah, so to be clear, you have to essentially get in the water to your knees or so in order to get on the kayak? That doesn't sound so hard. But, that makes it much less desirable as a tender, unless you're always willing to get wet.
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Old 01-07-2011
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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Ah, so to be clear, you have to essentially get in the water to your knees or so in order to get on the kayak? That doesn't sound so hard. But, that makes it much less desirable as a tender, unless you're always willing to get wet.
You are right - the sit-on-top kayak is not a dry ride.

We tried a regular kayak from a boat with a swim platform. You stayed dry, but it was awkward getting in and out.

I think we use the kayak more for recreation than for anything practical.
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Old 01-07-2011
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Getting in and out of these kayaks from a ladder or whatever takes some practice and a bit of grace (and upper body strength).. The key is keeping your weight centered in the boat as you manoeuver yourself in or out.

Using the lower (in water) ladder rung is very helpful and that's the technique my wife uses, as she hasn't got great balance. I'm quite able to get into and out of the kayaks feet dry, and can drop into the kayak from deck level without taking a swim. But it takes some practice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hesper View Post
We use the two-person inflatable kayak that West Marine sells (can't think of the name of it). We love it - easy to handle, tracks well in a cross-breeze, deflates into a suitcase and takes all of 5 minutes to inflate and launch.
Those inflatable kayaks definitely have their place - esp when the "mothership" is too small to host a rigid kayak on deck. But if you get an opportunity to go for a vigorous paddle with a group with hard kayaks, you'll notice the difference in effort and comfort between the two.

The other advantage you lose is the "oyster proofness' of the plastic boats.. it's one of the main reasons we like our kayaks so much, we don't worry about holing the inflatable on the beach (Oysters, Barnies, sharp rocks etc)
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I'm considering a Wilderness Systems Pungo kayak to keep on our boat. It has a wide bottom and hard chines for stability and the cockpit is large and open making entry easier but still dryer than a sit on top style.

Like others, I've pretty much ruled out using the kayak as a tender, but I still think it would be fun for messing about in and I can use it for quick solo trips ashore.
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2011
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I use Lightspeed Kayaks "Enigma" sit in kayak.



I find it quite easy to get into a kayak from a boat if you do it on a regular basis and are used to it. I prefer sit in kayaks myself and I actually use a kayak much more often that my hardshell skiff. The one I have is 9' long and weighing in at 30 lbs I can easily throw it on top of my pilothouse with one hand.
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Old 01-07-2011
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The sit on top is wet - something I didn't consider until it got colder this fall. The other day I noticed the boat bits blog mentioned the NUcanoe, which may be an option to a sit on top. Looks stable and has more room for stuff.
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