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post #101 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
when you have been getting beaten up by bad weather at sea for a week and you're standing off a safe anchorage in thumping weather, the desire to run for cover can become irrationally strong . . .
Worst possible mindset for trying to cross an inlet in bad weather, regardless of how many newfangles gizmos you've got on board.

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post #102 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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when you have been getting beaten up by bad weather at sea for a week and you're standing off a safe anchorage in thumping weather, the desire to run for cover can become irrationally strong . . .
This is known in mountaineering circles as "summit fever" the desire to get the summit (or port) despite the overwhelming objective dangers. Failure to recognize it and turn back (or turning back too late) has been at the root of many, otherwise avoidable, mountaineering (and sailing) tragedies. Resisting it is considered to be one of the signs of a wise and experienced mountaineer (and sailor), IMHO.

The same applies to sailing and sailors.

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
- Robert Heinlein

Last edited by svs3; 01-28-2011 at 02:40 PM.
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post #103 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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And if you become irrational and give into it, there's a pretty good chance you end up a statistic like they did on Rule 62.

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Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
There is a strong logic in what you say but when you have been getting beaten up by bad weather at sea for a week and you're standing off a safe anchorage in thumping weather, the desire to run for cover can become irrationally strong . . .

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post #104 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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I never said it was right or OK, I just said that it exists.

Bottom line I guess is that many do give in to it and that is why we get this constant stream of clips on this board that we appear to enjoy so much showing boats crashing into anchorages and harbours.


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post #105 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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I think the irrational aspect of this would be to NOT utilize the accuracy of a GPS, try to make landfall somewhere north of south of the inlet within the accuracy of the CN system, than spend a couple hours battling wind and waves while trying to find the inlet.

Lets flip a coin. Should I make a WAG (wild assed guess) as to what the weather is really going to do, stay offshore and get the hell beat out of me, the crew and the boat? Or, should I use the GPS and go directly to the inlet before the weather worsens? Hmmmm! Think I'll go with the GPS and dodge the worsening weather conditions.

Good Luck,

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post #106 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Just my two cents and yes I have learned CN is that a sextant is not an essential bit of kit to have on board any more. Even in the unlikely event, that all GPS system on board fail, the boat is not going to sink because of it and you are not going to die just because you are now left with DR and a compass, pilot charts and a log. Chances are that you are going to get to shore, maybe not in the exact place you wanted, but you are going to run out of water at some point.
I am not trying to discourage anyone from learning or using a sextant. I think that it is good to keep these traditional skills alive and still like to lite a camp fire with a bit of tinder and a few sparks as well but on a day to day basis I find using a lighter just more convenient.
Then there is the argument I sometime hear, that in some places a GPS fix is out by up to 2 miles because the time the area has been charted, it was done by CN. That does not mean, that I am going to be more accurate with a sextant in those areas by adding my mistakes to the ones the folks made when they drew the charts of those places. So I rather be a mile or two out using GPS then 5 or ten using a sextant.

Just my two cents worth.

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post #107 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
I think the irrational aspect of this would be to NOT utilize the accuracy of a GPS, try to make landfall somewhere north of south of the inlet within the accuracy of the CN system, than spend a couple hours battling wind and waves while trying to find the inlet.

Lets flip a coin. Should I make a WAG (wild assed guess) as to what the weather is really going to do, stay offshore and get the hell beat out of me, the crew and the boat? Or, should I use the GPS and go directly to the inlet before the weather worsens? Hmmmm! Think I'll go with the GPS and dodge the worsening weather conditions.

Good Luck,

Gary
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Quote:
The Global Positioning System faces the possibility of failures and blackouts, a federal watchdog agency has warned the U.S. Congress. Mismanagement by and underinvestment by the U.S. Air Force places the GPS at risk of failure in 2010 and beyond. The problem: Delays in launching replacement satellites, among other things.

According to the Government Accountability Office report, "In recent years, the Air Force has struggled to successfully build GPS satellites within cost and schedule goals" as part of a $2 billion modernization program.

"If the Air Force does not meet its schedule goals for development of GPS IIIA satellites, there will be an increased likelihood that in 2010, as old satellites begin to fail, the overall GPS constellation will fall below the number of satellites required to provide the level of GPS service that the U.S. government commits to."
GPS System Could Begin to Fail Within a Year - PCWorld Business Center
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post #108 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Yes there is going to be the odd black spot here and there, but they are going to get it sorted out because the military depends on the system. even with the odd black out, GPS is still going to be more dependable then CN on a cloudy or clear day for that matter.
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post #109 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Yes there is going to be the odd black spot here and there, but they are going to get it sorted out because the military depends on the system. even with the odd black out, GPS is still going to be more dependable then CN on a cloudy or clear day for that matter.
I'd stick with having no time constraints or deadlines, and heaving to well offshore while waiting for the right conditions, over relying on any electronic devices.

I'm old fashioned though, and my boat heaves to very well...
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post #110 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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I'd stick with having no time constraints or deadlines, and heaving to well offshore while waiting for the right conditions, over relying on any electronic devices.

I'm old fashioned though, and my boat heaves to very well...
+1

I would never enter an unfamiliar harbour at night or in restricted visibility.

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