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post #111 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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I would never enter an unfamiliar harbour at night or in restricted visibility.
+1

Words to live by, literally.

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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post #112 of 144 Old 01-28-2011
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Probbly the best lesson I have taken from all the fine sailers here at SN is thissin " RULE 62 " lesson after all once looked at in the light it was just plain common sence ...Yes there is everything in the world going on to persuade you to a different answer but fall back on rule #1 = keep your cool and do the right thing ! Thank you RULE 62 & crew & Sailnet!

That said my brain tells me you crawl before you walk,,,I just bought a damn good watch for CN in future now looking for what everyone thinks is the best "accurate" with in reason of the watchs abilitys 2 sec per month..

I was thinking getting a "used" Mark 25 Davis Sextant and getting a new mirror for it ...make since ??? if not hammer away plz...

There is no right way to do the wrong thing
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post #113 of 144 Old 01-29-2011
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Originally Posted by chrisncate View Post
I'd stick with having no time constraints or deadlines, and heaving to well offshore while waiting for the right conditions, over relying on any electronic devices.

I'm old fashioned though, and my boat heaves to very well...
I did not imply that I would enter a unknown port at night. I rather wait it out till the conditions are right. The most dangerous thing to have on board is a calendar.
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post #114 of 144 Old 01-29-2011
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I'd point out that racing to beat the weather gets a lot of sailors killed each year. Also, if you've made the decision to get into a harbor, often you'll try to do so, even if the conditions worsen and doing so becomes riskier than staying out, since most people tend to get stuck on a plan once they've made a decision.

I'd rather take the beating and live, than try for the harbor and die trying. Most boats aren't fast enough to make a damn difference when it comes to beating a storm, unless you have a fairlylong lead time.


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Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
I think the irrational aspect of this would be to NOT utilize the accuracy of a GPS, try to make landfall somewhere north of south of the inlet within the accuracy of the CN system, than spend a couple hours battling wind and waves while trying to find the inlet.

Lets flip a coin. Should I make a WAG (wild assed guess) as to what the weather is really going to do, stay offshore and get the hell beat out of me, the crew and the boat? Or, should I use the GPS and go directly to the inlet before the weather worsens? Hmmmm! Think I'll go with the GPS and dodge the worsening weather conditions.

Good Luck,

Gary

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post #115 of 144 Old 01-29-2011
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I would never enter an unfamiliar harbour at night or in restricted visibility. Quote:

When I was working commercially, this is what I've had to do many times.
It got to the point that every time I'm entering a new port it is always dark thirty or thick fog. Was sucessful every time. Mainly due to the fact that I read Coast Pilot for that port and studied the charts carefully. Time contrains and company expectations were the main reasons. But I've been sailing Commercially since Feb. '79 after retiring from the Navy Jan. '79 after 21 years as a Boatswain's Mate. So you could say that I've had a tad amount of sea time.

NO I don't recommend a boat skipper who goes sailing as a hobby to try this. The reason is the high pucker power down south on your body.....

1600 Ton Master, 2nd Mate Unlimited Tonnage

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post #116 of 144 Old 01-29-2011
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Large commercial ships tend to have a bit more power and deal with heavier seas a good deal better than a small recreational sailboat. They also are generally better crewed.


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I would never enter an unfamiliar harbour at night or in restricted visibility. Quote:

When I was working commercially, this is what I've had to do many times.
It got to the point that every time I'm entering a new port it is always dark thirty or thick fog. Was sucessful every time. Mainly due to the fact that I read Coast Pilot for that port and studied the charts carefully. Time contrains and company expectations were the main reasons. But I've been sailing Commercially since Feb. '79 after retiring from the Navy Jan. '79 after 21 years as a Boatswain's Mate. So you could say that I've had a tad amount of sea time.

NO I don't recommend a boat skipper who goes sailing as a hobby to try this. The reason is the high pucker power down south on your body.....

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #117 of 144 Old 01-30-2011
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Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Large commercial ships tend to have a bit more power and deal with heavier seas a good deal better than a small recreational sailboat. They also are generally better crewed.
HAH!.. You MUST be joking!! A bunch of half-drunk Fillipinos are a "better crew"??? Obviously you haven't been on any commercial shipping lately, SD.

The biggest thing commercial ships have going for them are a little group called SEA PILOTS who make it their business to ensure commercial ships get into their particular port relatively unscathed - and lose their job if they don't.

Give credit where it's due, please..

-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
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post #118 of 144 Old 01-30-2011
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Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
+1

I would never enter an unfamiliar harbour at night or in restricted visibility.
Probably just me, but I prefer “Never say never…” Or, in other words, “It depends… “ (grin)

No question, it’s an excellent rule of thumb… but, I’ve always thought it make more sense to assess each situation individually, which in the long run results in superior seamanship, IMHO…

Given reasonable or favorable conditions, many harbors can be safely entered after dark… frankly, anyone incapable of entering Port Everglades, or Beaufort, NC, for example, after dark likely has no business being on the water at night to begin with…

Same thing with poor visibility, sometimes you really have no good options… Say you’ve made a passage to Nova Scotia for the first time, and are making landfall at Lunenberg… Every harbor on that coast is gonna be unfamiliar to you. If it’s in July, there’s a good chance you haven’t had more than 100 meters of visibility for the last 100 miles… Are you really heave-to off Lunenberg for a week, perhaps more, until the fog dissipates?

Again, it’s a good rule of thumb, no question… But, I think there are many instances in which it can be "broken" safely, given sufficient experience and situational awareness…
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post #119 of 144 Old 01-30-2011
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If I never entered an unfamiliar harbor or inlet at night I would have spent most of my life at sea waiting around for better weather and daylight. My first trip through Oregon and Hatteras inlets were damned well frightening--both are nothing more than slots in the surf. I've been through both several times since, and while it's always a bit exhilarating, there has only been a few times that I opted to remain a few miles offshore until the tide slacked. The wind never seems to slack at the Outer Banks, though.

Good Luck,

Gary
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post #120 of 144 Old 02-03-2011
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Yes there is going to be the odd black spot here and there, but they are going to get it sorted out because the military depends on the system. even with the odd black out, GPS is still going to be more dependable then CN on a cloudy or clear day for that matter.
The "Military" depends on the system and also jammes the system.Worse they send a false signal that they have compensated for in there systems but will put you 20+ miles off.I hope you never go through the frustration of having your celest.sights being consistently off and not knowing why.Take a sextant to a war zone and compare your shots to your gps and see....grins.
That said you will never enter a harbor with a sextant.Just find the entrance if your good.As for entering a strange harbor at night with a gps,much less with somebody else's waypoints.......is your life insurance paid up?
My Thoughts
Mark

Last edited by travler37; 02-03-2011 at 03:01 AM. Reason: more info
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