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  #11  
Old 01-19-2011
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Not slighting you at all, Mizu.

If you did your research, and have determined that your boat was built for blue water work, then great!

Just by way of example, an Albin Vega is capable of blue water work, but it usually requires a few modifications in order to do so. I didn't know what kind of boat you had.

Ok, so you have the boat. Just offer your self up as an able-bodied seaman and do a couple of passages. Ask questions, take notes, take some applicable classes and start with a few short passages of your own.
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  #12  
Old 01-19-2011
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One other thing is; How Lucky are you? Along with acquiring the necessary skills, you also need to be a tad Lucky or have the Big Bos'un in the sky looking after your.
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  #13  
Old 01-19-2011
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If you're principally experienced on the Chesapeake, you may not have raised a storm sail on a pitching deck or deployed/retrieved a sea anchor, or a drogue for that matter. On the Chessy, if it gets dicey, one usually goes home or tucks in somewhere if riding it out would take more than an hour or two. When three days offshore, you need to be able to deal with it for as long as it takes. Those skills may be something to focus on.
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  #14  
Old 01-19-2011
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Also, the fetch and size of waves you deal with on the Chesapeake, which is essentially landlocked, are generally far smaller than you might encounter on a north Atlantic crossing.

Also the storms you deal with are generally short duration, and while they can be fairly fierce, the duration and dealing with a summer afternoon thundersquall and dealing with a large ocean storm are totally different things.
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  #15  
Old 01-19-2011
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Mizu,

In another thread on another forum, somebody complained about how much experience their insurance company expected of them before the company would insure the boat on a transatlantic voyage.

An answer from one of the respondents has always stuck with me, to the effect of: "You will have enough experience (to satisfy the insurance company) when you are ready to undertake the voyage without insurance."

In any case, I would agree with some of the others here that you should try to get some experience outside of the Chesapeake, on the real ocean, before deciding that you are ready for a transatlantic -- maybe start with a DelMarVa circumnavigation, or you could try a Chesapeake to New England trip, then step up to a Chesapeake to Bermuda trip...

Good Luck
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  #16  
Old 01-19-2011
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Another story that leads to something to think about: At a Safety at Sea seminar for one of the Bermuda races, one of the featured speakers was a flight officer for the Coast Guard rescue helicopters based on Cape Cod. He made the point that their effective range is really only about 350 miles, and that the voyage to Bermuda would take you beyond that range. One of the sailors in the audience just couldn't get over the fact that he might be sailing beyond the range of helicopter rescue, and repeatedly asked questions about that.

Sailing beyond the range of (relatively) quick rescue entails a certain level of commitment -- you will be essentially on your own, and need to be comfortable with that. I think of it as a pyschological thing as much as an experience/capability thing. Certainly having confidence in your capabilities helps, and having experience helps to build that confidence, but still you need a certain amount of daring to make the initial leap, to make that commitment.

Good Luck again!
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  #17  
Old 01-19-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mizu View Post
LOL Tommys...Yeah the army taught me that I can function pretty well with a 20 min nap ever couple of hours for weeks on end.

But I would be bringing others with me.
Hopefully some people with more exerience than me but maybe some with just as much as me.

I have a good boat.
I have good equipment.
I have a decent amount of sailing under my belt.
I have handled my share of difficult conditions including a couple that would have lost to boat if I had not been good under pressure.

I THINK I have what it takes. But I like to gather as much intel as possible before pulling the trigger on something like this.

Thank you for your inputs. All thoughts are welcome.
Mizu, it looks like you have a good start. I would listen carefully what others say, but I would not let it damper my dream. You will know when you are ready. Go for it. Life is too short sitting around planing to go NOWHERE.

BTW, If you need a madman to sail with you in a stormy sea, I am the man.
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Last edited by rockDAWG; 01-19-2011 at 04:04 PM.
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  #18  
Old 01-19-2011
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Theres always reasons not to go but if you up for it there are organised Atlantic crossing that lend some support. The general rule is a seaworthy boat and a 500 mile passage. Sounds like you have the right attitude to suceed.
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Old 01-19-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Also, the fetch and size of waves you deal with on the Chesapeake, which is essentially landlocked, are generally far smaller than you might encounter on a north Atlantic crossing.

Also the storms you deal with are generally short duration, and while they can be fairly fierce, the duration and dealing with a summer afternoon thundersquall and dealing with a large ocean storm are totally different things.
Chesapeake Bay is really good training ground. The storm comes fast and be gone fast in half hour or so - a good practice run to see where we need work. My son and I used to take a dingy Catalina 14.2 out when small craft advisory is posted. We lost count how many time we have turtled our boat. One cold morning in early November, we stuck our mast into mud that we could not right it. Coast Guard had to tow us back.
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  #20  
Old 01-19-2011
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Sailing ability is but one concern.

being able to provision is more than just buying grocercies.

dealing with medical issues requires more than standard first aid

making necessary repairs underway requires more than quick fixes

making do or otherwise when things cannot be repaired requires expereince (read mistakes)

having the right crew may not involve the beer buddies
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