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post #21 of 53 Old 01-19-2011
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Nicely said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Sailing ability is but one concern.

being able to provision is more than just buying grocercies.

dealing with medical issues requires more than standard first aid

making necessary repairs underway requires more than quick fixes

making do or otherwise when things cannot be repaired requires expereince (read mistakes)

having the right crew may not involve the beer buddies

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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #22 of 53 Old 01-19-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Sailing ability is but one concern.

being able to provision is more than just buying grocercies.

dealing with medical issues requires more than standard first aid

making necessary repairs underway requires more than quick fixes

making do or otherwise when things cannot be repaired requires expereince (read mistakes)

having the right crew may not involve the beer buddies
Nicely said +2.

Going back to your original question, "Is crossing the Atlanic more a matter of moderate skill and great intestinal fortitude? Or is Great skill required?" and picking up on jackdale's summary, it's not great sailing skill that is needed, but good project management and good problem-solving abilities!

Peterson 34 GREYHAWK, West Boothbay Harbor, Maine

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post #23 of 53 Old 01-19-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
Chesapeake Bay is really good training ground. The storm comes fast and be gone fast in half hour or so -
Not always. I was in a a storm several years ago near Smith Point, (Where the Potomac enters The Bay). A large squall came roaring down the river and met one coming down The Bay. We had 8' waves and 40 knot winds as we crossed the bar at Smith Point. Another boat in the area that night sank and 5 people drowned, I didn't hear about this until later. The high wind and waves continued for the next several hours and the waves did nit go down for 36 hours. My point is there are some bad storms on our little inland sea, and lets not forget that a large USNA off shore racing boat, out for practice 18 months ago dis-masted and had to be rescued by the Coast Guard at the mouth of the West River.

Joe McCary,
Sailing on The Central Chesapeake Bay, West River, MD on my Catalina 27, Aelous II with my wife and friends.
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post #24 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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One can over think ..what if ?
Drag up anchor and go for it !
Would of ,should of ,could have !
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post #25 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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I thought the one suggestion of sailing for 24, 48, or 72 hours non stop would be a big help.
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post #26 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mccary View Post
Not always. I was in a a storm several years ago near Smith Point, (Where the Potomac enters The Bay). A large squall came roaring down the river and met one coming down The Bay. We had 8' waves and 40 knot winds as we crossed the bar at Smith Point. Another boat in the area that night sank and 5 people drowned, I didn't hear about this until later. The high wind and waves continued for the next several hours and the waves did nit go down for 36 hours. My point is there are some bad storms on our little inland sea, and lets not forget that a large USNA off shore racing boat, out for practice 18 months ago dis-masted and had to be rescued by the Coast Guard at the mouth of the West River.
I apologize if I gave you and others the impression of Chesapeake bay storm is nothing to fear of. I never underestimate the power of water, even the water in the bathtub. I pray to the Water Gods every time I am on water for his mercy.


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post #27 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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Quote:
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I thought the one suggestion of sailing for 24, 48, or 72 hours non stop would be a big help.
Yeap, I highly recommend this. Have some backup plan but push your limits.

Last year I did a non-stop 32-hr sailing from Annapolis to St Mary City and back battling with wind up 25 knots with 6 ft seas from 10 pm to 4 am just outside Point Look out. At 6 am, I lost steering and almost kissing the barge on my port side. I was lucky and missed the barge. I could see the eye balls of the captain.

After the trip, I still have a mental capacity to drive home and have some other fun before I went to bed. So I think I will good for a 48 hrs non-stop sailing solo. When I was a young man, I'm often on call for 48 to 60 hrs. I had never have any problems.


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post #28 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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Well it looks like you are going to do it.
Therefor you might want to consider taking the U.S. Power Squadron Cruise Planning course.
I like the suggestion about crewing on a trans Atlantic sail.
I wish you well.

Dick

Last edited by Flybyknight; 01-20-2011 at 05:17 PM.
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post #29 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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Lots of good advice here. It always amazes me how little preparation the Europeans do for a transatlantic trip. They bop down to the Azores and then lounge across to the Caribbean, downwind almost all the way. Warm water and steady wind: piece of cake. Going the other way is not the same. We ran into three storms on our 21 day voyage to Ireland. One of them lasted for more than a day and generated waves about 20' high. Out the the 21 days we had about 14 without fog. Sometimes the fog was so thick we could not see the forestay from the helm on the 38' boat. It was so cold (we left in June) we ran the bulkhead heater to stay warm and dry our gloves, hats, sweaters and other clothes. We had four crew keeping the boat moving, plus the skipper and his wife/cook who both helped whenever needed.
One aspect of our trip you will appreciate: the skipper was a WWII Destroyer commander who had served in both the Atlantic and Pacific. He subscribed to what he called the Air Force System: Plan everything. That way, he said, when the Sh** hits the fan, it will be because you planned it that way. He did a circumnavigation of Labrador to prepare for the transatlantic trip. He'd seen the North Atlantic in Winter, while looking for submarines.
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post #30 of 53 Old 01-20-2011
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That last post was salty...I will visit Ireland someday hopefully...preferably in a ship built by Boeing....
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