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  #1  
Old 01-31-2011
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Are we (North America) buying too much boat ?

I understand:

1. Safety is important.
2. We all are different and have different views or degree of taking risk
3. We all have different budgets and expectation.

Even those who cross the oceans, majority of the time, they are sailing with a little wind and mooring a safe harbor. Therefore 99.5% of the time, a coastal sailing boat is more than adequate. I have seen lot of sailboats sailed from Europe to the States and Caribbean, they are not Hallberg Rassy. Most of them are Beneteau, Jeanneau and etc.

OTOH, in Chesapeake Bay I have seen so many blue water boats moving up and down the bay and go nowhere near the ocean. I just don't want to buy a boat more than I really need - crossing the oceans when once when I am ready (round trip, hopefully).
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Old 01-31-2011
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Rash assumption #1: That what looks like a bluewater boat, really is a bluewater boat.

Rash assumption #2: That because you haven't seen them go out into blue water, they hadn't, haven't, don't, and won't be going out into blue water.

Heck, if they did a Bermuda race every other year, they'd still need to be blue water boats. But you wouldn't see them unless you were also out there during the right two week stretch, once every other year.
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Old 01-31-2011
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As a sub-40 ft owner of a Beneteau production boat...let me ask how many SMALL production boats are sailed over or across on their own bottoms. I'd venture to say not so many.

A larger Beneteau, Jeanneau, Catalina, etc....I'd take across the ocean, but not sub-40 ft.
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Old 01-31-2011
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A 343 was probably not build to cros oceans, but I would sail a Bene 393 across Atlantic.
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Old 01-31-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by night0wl View Post
As a sub-40 ft owner of a Beneteau production boat...let me ask how many SMALL production boats are sailed over or across on their own bottoms. I'd venture to say not so many.

A larger Beneteau, Jeanneau, Catalina, etc....I'd take across the ocean, but not sub-40 ft.


WHY? It's only been the last 15-20 years that the size of the avg cruiser has gone up over 40' or so. A generation ago people were out there in boats in the mid 30 foot range. Tania went around in a 26' boat. Robin L Graham was in a 24' boat for 3/4's of his circum IIRC. And then moved up to a an Allied 33. Boats only got bigger b/c people decided they had to take so much crap w/ them. And sail handling got easier; electric winches, dependable furlers, etc.

I personally don't want something bigger than 40'. And I'll be glad to go offshore in something smaller than 40'.
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Old 01-31-2011
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Which way?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
I understand:
I have seen lot of sailboats sailed from Europe to the States and Caribbean, they are not Hallberg Rassy. Most of them are Beneteau, Jeanneau and etc.
.

They don't call it the milk run for nothing. They go downwind from the European mainland to the Azores in the late spring or early summer, and then continue on - downwind again - to the Carribean. Typically undercanvassed, they get to the islands and fly home rather than try to beat their way back. Going into the North Atlantic would be a whole 'nother experience. Columbus did the same thing, but came home on the Gulf Stream. (Not that he knew what it was.)
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Old 01-31-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
WHY? It's only been the last 15-20 years that the size of the avg cruiser has gone up over 40' or so. A generation ago people were out there in boats in the mid 30 foot range. ....

I personally don't want something bigger than 40'. And I'll be glad to go offshore in something smaller than 40'.
Older boats were a lot heavier and a lot slower. An American 30 year's old 33ft will probably weight as much as a modern European 40ft big production boat and, if it was built now, would probably cost about the same to produce.

There are exceptions, but as a rule, to have the seaworthiness of an older smaller boat you need now a bigger boat. So for the same money you have a bigger boat, the same seaworthiness, lots of more interior space and a lot more speed. It makes sense to me and it seems that to most sailors. That's why the market has moved in that direction

Regards

Paulo
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Old 01-31-2011
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Bigger does not necessarily mean safer, in fact the exact opposite might be true. The loads on the bigger sails become too much to handle for many and I for one would be fine in the properly prepared 35 - 40 foot cruiser. The abilities of the captain and crew have more to do with the ability to cross oceans, and don't forget the Southern Ocean, than a lot of other factors.
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Old 01-31-2011
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I think that a boat you feel comfortable in is the most important...There are dozens of good boats out there...the older 60's and 70's ones can be a bit soggy but can be dried out, epoxied and stringered out to bolster that panel weakness and be brought up to snuff for the most part...for still far less than a new bigger boat that relies more on speed and gadgets...It takes some work though...and time...

In fact the older boat (brought up to snuff)combined with " newer" gadgetry(roller furling,navigation and safety electronics,etc.)... could be a superb mix of ingredients from a point of view of those with less wallet and more imagination...that can let you soar upon the waves with say... a 24-36-footer....in a boat that equals or surpasses many of the modern 40+ foot boats....just a theory..but I'm sticking to it...

Last edited by souljour2000; 01-31-2011 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 01-31-2011
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My Cape Dory 25, (full deep keel) survived a 45kt. nor'easter a lot better than I did.
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