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  #21  
Old 02-03-2011
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Well, there we have it. A trimaran...not a displacement vessel and a much quicker vessel...get in and get out. I'm sure GRP vessels have done it, successfully but I just think the risk of loosing the vessel is quite great. I would be a very nervous camper watching a field of ice moving in on me with nowhere to go. Not to compare to the NWP to say the least but Heck, I've pushed through very thin layers of ice and I've been worried sick about my gelcoat , it didn't stop me...but still.
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  #22  
Old 02-03-2011
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Man, you guys have pimped your blog to epic proportions..

http://belzebub2.com - Google Search

Hats off, I have discovered ten new forums because of you..
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  #23  
Old 02-04-2011
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If it was me doing this trip I would think very hard about spending a season sailing Greenland and as far north on northeastern coast of Canada I could get before trying the NWP. I would use that trip to first gain some experience in that part of the world and second as an opportunity to test my boat and equipment, my sailing, navigation, repair, provision, and coping strategies. But mostly to test myself and to see how my ideas about the nature of such a trip actually comport with the reality of such a trip. I would take copious notes during the voyage. Then I would return home and set about making any changes I need to in light of that trip.

Anyways, that my 2 cents.
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  #24  
Old 02-04-2011
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Wise advice, but I think that goes against the idea of doing this on a shoe-string budget.

Love your signature btw...big fan of Robert.
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Originally Posted by svs3 View Post
If it was me doing this trip I would think very hard about spending a season sailing Greenland and as far north on northeastern coast of Canada I could get before trying the NWP. I would use that trip to first gain some experience in that part of the world and second as an opportunity to test my boat and equipment, my sailing, navigation, repair, provision, and coping strategies. But mostly to test myself and to see how my ideas about the nature of such a trip actually comport with the reality of such a trip. I would take copious notes during the voyage. Then I would return home and set about making any changes I need to in light of that trip.

Anyways, that my 2 cents.
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  #25  
Old 02-04-2011
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Don't launch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Exiles View Post
Hi all,

We are planning a voyage where the possibility of hull punctures are very real! I wanted to ask everyones opinion on techniques and equipment we should have on board to respond to a small to large hull puncture. I have heard of people using wet cure epoxy, cushions, sails any suggestions???

Please check out our rare and remote voyage we would like your feed back a

Northwest passage on a shoestring

Thanks !!!
I'm serious. Having been on a sinking boat with a sudden and good sized opening in the hull, there's really nothing you can do but get off fast, or run it onto an island(like we did). You won't have that option around icebergs.

Whatever it takes not to get that hole in the bottom is what you want to focus on.
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Old 02-04-2011
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Thank you all keep them coming

We are going to seal the compartment under the vberth where collision is most probable. I know a salvager in town here and will ask him about the viability of airbags.

Great thing about 1976 hallberg rassy they still didnt know the strength of fiberglass and it is built like a tank not like the bath tubs built today. Lots of great suggestions!!!
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  #27  
Old 02-04-2011
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[quote=svs3;694349]"If it was me doing this trip I would think very hard about spending a season sailing Greenland and as far north on northeastern coast of Canada I could get before trying the NWP. "

Believe it was Amundsen, first to cross NWP in early 1900's...sailed north and at beginning of passage stopped
and spent a year living/learning with natives (much to his crews horror) before he continued on successfully.
Took 2-3 years total.
Last year (sept?) New Zealander did NWP in 2 weeks!
**disclaimer...previous success no guarentee
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  #28  
Old 02-04-2011
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Then there's these guys who did it on a Hobie 18...over 3 years.

One of the greatest sailing adventures of the past 20 years was the conquest of the Northwest Passage, powered by sail, human muscle, and determination. In 100 days, over three summers (1986-88), Canadians Jeff MacInnis and Mike Beedell accomplished the first wind-powered crossing of the Northwest Passage.

Sorry that it doesn't directly address the OP's question, but that story just amazes me.
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  #29  
Old 02-04-2011
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Quote:
Love your signature btw...big fan of Robert.
Yeah Bob was a great writer.

Quote:
Wise advice, but I think that goes against the idea of doing this on a shoe-string budget.
It is possible to be penny wise and pound foolish, as they say.

Of course I said that with no idea of the OP's experience is in high latitude sailing.
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  #30  
Old 02-07-2011
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JonEisberg will become famous soon enough
As others have suggested, avoid putting a hole in the boat to begin with…

One thing I’d suggest, not just for ice, but for anyone venturing offshore, is to configure a custom fitted collision mat from a very tough fabric such as Stamoid, that will cover the entire bow/forward third of your hull to 18” or so above the waterline, pre-rigged so that it could be put in place in a matter or minutes… that MIGHT give you a bit of breathing room, to begin effecting a repair…

A great amount of luck will likely determine the outcome of your intended voyage… The greatest risk you will face, by far, is getting caught by moving pack ice… If you were in a steel boat, you could have a prayer in such a situation… A fiberglass boat, however, you’re likely to be crushed like an eggshell, there’s good reason why most people would not consider attempting the NW Passage in a boat such as yours…

Frankly, I don’t see how you will be able to carry the amount of fuel required, not to mention the stores should you not make it through and be required to winter over… One of the main problems with going with a small boat so heavily-laden, she will be unlikely to “pop up” above the surrounding ice in a crushing scenario, unless you start tossing your supplies onto the ice… Not good…

Someone suggested an extensive shakedown of a season in Greenland, that’s excellent advice… Given your location, a summer in Svalbard could afford some hints as to what you might be up against, but I doubt you want to hear that…

Frankly, I think attempting such a voyage in a fiberglass boat, with an engine about which you “are becoming increasingly concerned”, is incredibly foolhardy… Probably just me, when I think of voyaging “on a shoestring”, I think of places like the Bahamas, Mexico, and so forth… The Northwest Passage? Well, not so much…

But, since you are budget conscious, I’d suggest you go the route of two of the most exemplary sailors I have ever had the pleasure to meet, and go without an EPIRB… Show the commitment of Tim and Pauline Carr, when they decided to venture into the Antarctic Convergence and South Georgia aboard CURLEW, they fully realized the magnitude of their choice to sail there, and the inherent unfairness of expecting any sort of rescue, the severity of the jeopardy they might be placing upon any potential rescuers… Why not demonstrate a similar appreciation of the magnitude of the risk you are taking, and prepare yourselves – to use Blondie Hasler’s famous words regarding voyaging without a radio – “to drown like a gentleman”…

Frankly, I think your plan betrays a profound ignorance of the sort of things you might encounter on such a trip… Not to say it can’t be done, of course – with the right amount of luck, no doubt it could be… I haven’t been that far north, but I have made it pretty far south, and it’s not the sort of place you want to have to depend on LUCK in order to survive…

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