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  #1  
Old 02-04-2011
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What stupid tension...

I wonder how many others have this issue...

There's a natural desire to have a boat two feet longer. In that case, for us, a 36 footer. Maybe a pretty, cream-colored Rival 36 from the radically modern late 1980s...

However, we have a tendency to buy older, heavier sea-worthy boats. We like newer and lighter and longer boats, but either a) they seem expensive or b) they seem flimsy. And c) in our price range, they are coastal cruisers.

So, heck, we're coastal cruisers right now, but we've been out in 45 knots, and the channel can be more than a bit rough, and boats need to be a bit beefier here (or the sailors more skilled with race boats, which seem to have stainless that bends quite willingly in strong winds on the Fastnet). Yet, there are many happy Jeanneau and Beneteau owners here as well.

So, we have a heavy but comfy 34 footer, all paid off, and there's still the thought of "wouldn't 40 feet of something be nice." Is it essential? No. Would it be more comfy? Yes. Would a loan be involved? Yes. And what about the kid's college funds? Ugh.

There's a lot to be said about having a boat paid off. A smaller boat is more affordable to keep in good nick, and buy new winches for, and do nice upgrades on without breaking the bank. And, plenty of our breed (Rival 34s) have done Atlantic circuits, and raced to the Azores, etc. It's just different mindset from having a Malo or HR or 44 foot cruiser/racer.

So, the year-to-year conundrum-- invest in the owned boat, save for a big boat, master the small boat, plan for a bigger boat, or go small/go now, or go once the kids are off the college (when a smaller boat becomes larger, and really one shouldn't have a boat two big for two empty nesters to handle anyway).

Sure, there's no one answer, and we're lucky to own and sail anything at all. I just wish the question would be less distracting.

Anyway, off to work on the 34 footer tomorrow, a little piece of home for a family of renters...

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Last edited by Jim H; 02-04-2011 at 03:13 PM.
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  #2  
Old 02-04-2011
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My 2 cents

I think I get what you are saying. I am looking at a 34 footer myself but that's a boat I would have for myself to do a circumnavigation. But I have no kids and two exwives. If she's reading this. (It's in the mail honey)
Anyway If your kids are not in college yet I would recommend selling them. (especially if they are teenagers)
Then you and your wife go buy the boat you want with the money and let someone else try to get them to take out the garbage.
The first thing I did when I figured out I was once a teenager. Apologized to my parents.
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Old 02-04-2011
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Two-foot-itis is pretty common... personally, I'd say keep the boat you know so well and have paid off, rather than go to a new boat that is going to have its own set of problems and issues and cost you a lot more to get comfortable with.
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Old 02-04-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by w1651 View Post
Anyway If your kids are not in college yet I would recommend selling them. (especially if they are teenagers)
Yeah, we definitely considered that. The irritating part is that they are great kids, and they do sailing adventures with us on a small boat (for four) without complaint. In fact, my daughter has said more than once

"You notice that we never fight on the boat?"

Which is actually true. Shocking, but true.

For me, at least, having kids kind of kick started my career-- can't tread water when you have kids-- and that was a good thing. So, sailing with them has been a pleasure, and may be the best sailing we ever do.

However, a nice forty footer could be...
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Old 02-04-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Two-foot-itis is pretty common... personally, I'd say keep the boat you know so well and have paid off, rather than go to a new boat that is going to have its own set of problems and issues and cost you a lot more to get comfortable with.
That advice is completely sensible, and is our current course.

The other benefit is that a Rival 34 is not an easy boat to handle. She's heavy and spins like a pinwheel in reverse. Another Rival owner said to us-- "Good for you! A Rival has a real learning curve. You can sail any boat after that."

The other plus is the owner's association--

Front

I really admire how well and how far these boats can be sailed.
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Old 02-04-2011
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You sound like the luckiest man in the world to me ..

Keep It !
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Old 02-04-2011
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Being practical sucks!

Being practical sucks. But the alternative is worse. I am in the same boat as you down to the two kids with college on the horizon and an older boat in the same size range as yours. Having a boat that is paid for, even if it's not the boat of your dreams, is a pretty special place to be. I think the memories you've made on your boat must prove that out. It certainly does for me.

I have a friend that went bigger, and newer and after a couple of years could no longer justify the mortgage and expenses associated with a bigger boat so he ended up selling it and bought a little power boat. I know you are much in a much happier place than he is. Enjoy it, life is good.

Thanks for the photo, it has me longing for spring and being on the water again.
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Old 02-04-2011
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As a Catalina 36 owner (2 over 25 years) I have been in a state of perpetual Catalina 42 lust for YEARS. This is a common move I'm told. When they introduced the 375, I really loved it....until I saw the price. I decided to embark on what I called my "Sales Tax Plan". Not sure if you have sales taxes in the UK, but we sure do here in California, about 8.75%. What I did was set aside just the sales tax on a new boat and put that money into renewing and improving every inch of my current paid off 36. From lifelines to cowl vents to electronics, etc, I now have a minty fresh Cat 36 without that nasty mortgage aftertaste. Oh, and I never did spend all of the sales tax money.

Mike
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Old 02-04-2011
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Smile

Being over here on the East Coast of Ireland I,m glad I can still afford to keep my 26fter. With the involuntary contribution to the bankers and the drop in my main asset I'm looking forward to a good long summer cruise to break the slog. Still back to 2ftism, cant say it affects me as I find Aurora a handful on a long haul and I mostly go single handed so no real issues with space.
Happy sailing
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Old 02-04-2011
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I sure hope to reach the same destination and to have the same problems.
I currently have a 23 ft. boat, and my kids are still long time to college
- 3 years and 3 weeks. (hell, right know I can not get enough sleepin ). My major concern (after $$ thats obvious) is whether I will have any time for sailing next couple of years.
My strategy is concentrate on the function - spend on the stuff that makes the boat sail better - only, do not care about the looks, and use the money and time to go sailing.
To add to the dog's comment, the interest $$ and the price depreciation you've got on the new boat are for you to eat, you can not recover it. Plus, the constant worries not to ding the shiny new sides, complex systems that will brake down...
It does not worth it.
You've got it right already, just enjoy the wind and sea!!!
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