Rigging jacklines - Page 4 - SailNet Community
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post #31 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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+1 on being able to clip in while still in the cabin before coming on deck.



Here you can see a Wichard double-action clip on a U-bolt just below the companionway sill, with the tether leading over the sill into the cabin. Once below, the user can unclip their tether from their harness and they are free to move about the cabin.

You can also see the yellow webbing jackline running up the leeward deck.

At the aft end they terminate with a cow-hitch like so:



This is well forward of the transom.

The forward ends are belayed onto my side bow cleats:



We put twists into the webbing when rigging them so that it is relatively easy to get the hook onto them. If they lay totally flat on the deck, you might need two hands -- one to lift the webbing off the deck -- in order to clip on. Especially if they are wet. The twists don't cause any problem when stepping on the webbing -- it flattens under foot and doesn't roll.

Finally, depending on the materials your jacklines are made of, I would argue that they should NOT be permanently rigged. You should take them up whenever the boat is going to be left idle for any period of time, for example, otherwise the material will degrade with exposure to the sun's UV.

Peterson 34 GREYHAWK, West Boothbay Harbor, Maine

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post #32 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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I agree with NCC320 for my circumstances. On my very narrow beamed boat jacklines seem pretty worthless. When I go forward I need one hand just to keep the teather from snagging. I'd rather have two hands available for holding on. In addition, there is no way I would be able to get back on the boat if I were dumped over on the end of a teather. (I have tried.) If I absolutely had to die, I would rather have some time to bargin with God, say goodbye to the world, and finally and hopefully accept my fate with a semblance of dignity and peace---wishful thinking?---then to be drowned by my boat and become trolling bait.

In a blow I stay in the cockpit or down below. Once the genoa has blown out because I was to scared to go forward. (I've since tried to rig the boat to forestall that.) Besides the headsail I can't think of other reasons why one would need to go past the mast in high winds and waves. Maybe the anchor coming lose on the bow roller and banging up the boat? Anything else?
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post #33 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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As far as running the jacklines up the side deck versus up the middle, I would argue that I want to rig things in such a way as to minimize as much as possible the number of times I need to unclip and reclip in order to move about the boat. A double tether is good in that you can clip the second tether before unclipping the first, but the more you're messing around with your clips, the less you are concentrating on holding on and attending to the task that needed attending to.

Really, I would give a higher priority to making sure you have excellent hand-holds, great non-skid, and good toe-holds, and to developing your own agility and "technique" for moving about in a seaway.

Peterson 34 GREYHAWK, West Boothbay Harbor, Maine

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Last edited by catamount; 02-09-2011 at 09:53 AM.
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post #34 of 55 Old 02-09-2011 Thread Starter
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I just have to say that when I first posted my question starting this thread, I was concerned that the reaction might be "oh, not another jackline thread...". Which is why I first spent some time searching for old posts on the topic to see what already had been said on the subject.

I'm very glad to be able to say this has been a very valuable discussion for me - lots of excellent photos, explanations, ideas, pros and cons, etc.

Very helpful! Thanks so much and keep it coming.

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post #35 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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I do two jacklines, one on either side of the mast, down the center of the boat. Both are flat straps, not line, which can roll under your feet and cause mayhem thereby. They clip to a fat Wichard folding padeye in the cockpit and terminate on the bowsprit. The harness has two lanyards so that I can clip onto the second jackline before disconnecting the first. Both are six feet, so there's no way I can go overboard further than deck level. I think the analogue to seat belts is appropriate.
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post #36 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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Both are six feet, so there's no way I can go overboard further than deck level.
Except maybe at the bow?
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post #37 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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I've checked it out and I can still get back aboard no problem.
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post #38 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCC320 View Post
Are we fooling ourselves about jacklines and tethers. The illustrations posted and the general consensus is that jacklines are rigged along the main deck inboard as much as possible. That is usually less than 2ft from edge of boat in most cases. ......
You make a very valid point.
My preference is to have the jacklines as close as possible to the centerline (one per each side), plus a tether that has multiple connection points - thus able to lengthen or shorten the 'effective' length of the teather.

Since my jacklines (tubular webbing) are nylon and therefore somewhat stretchy (dampens impact) and are not 'taught' between their ends ..... my usual is that the jackline is 'raised to me' (very short tether position) rather than using a typical long tether and taught jackline. (I used to do mountain rescue, so the slack jacklines to me are 'de rigueur', 'old hat'.)

I use the Wichard double-action 'safety' hooks on my tether - two 'motions' to open as I dont want the extra time to unscrew the 'gate' of a locking carabiner. http://www.wichard.com/fiche-A|WICHARD|7005-0203010101000000-ME.html (available through Sailnet store).
On the mountain you usually have time to unlock a carabiner, not always so on a boat.
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post #39 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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LOL...mine are rigged outboard of the shrouds, and are over five feet from the edge of the boat, since the boat is 18' wide. Also, the fact that my boat only heels about 10˚ most of the time helps.

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You make a very valid point.
My preference is to have the jacklines as close as possible to the centerline (one per each side), plus a tether that has multiple connection points - thus able to lengthen or shorten the 'effective' length of the teather.

Since my jacklines (tubular webbing) are nylon and therefore somewhat stretchy (dampens impact) and are not 'taught' between their ends ..... my usual is that the jackline is 'raised to me' (very short tether position) rather than using a typical long tether and taught jackline. (I used to do mountain rescue, so the slack jacklines to me are 'de rigueur', 'old hat'.)

I use the Wichard double-action 'safety' hooks on my tether - two 'motions' to open as I dont want the extra time to unscrew the 'gate' of a locking carabiner. http://www.wichard.com/fiche-A|WICHARD|7005-0203010101000000-ME.html (available through Sailnet store).
On the mountain you usually have time to unlock a carabiner, not always so on a boat.

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post #40 of 55 Old 02-09-2011
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dog --- you're 'cheating'. :-o
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