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  #21  
Old 02-08-2011
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Only time you might heave to or use a sea anchor is if there 's a new landfall you don't want to approach at night. Then you might hang around away from the ship channel so as to make your entrance in daylight
or if there is a storm/big squall or something.

Even if you sleep only 20 min, thats enough time for a tanker to appear on the horizon and disappear on the other side....They are fast buggers
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  #22  
Old 02-08-2011
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500 NM is serious distance single handed for someone with these types of questions.... That's 4-5 days non stop.

If your boat is making average of 7 kts straight line then you should be an offshore racer....

Start small, short trips on a watch. You will be amazed how tiring a full night can be with the heat loss and fatigue of the focus and attention of the nav.

Rules of thumb - start with a crew, 6x4 hr shift 24/7. Widdle the crew down to the smallest number you're comfortable with, then add one. That's the idea crew you should be looking at. You add one because they can get sick, fall, hurt, etc... gives you backup.

Single handing long distances is not for the faint of heart, or for those lacking in significant offshore experience as crew or captain.
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  #23  
Old 02-08-2011
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Tips for night sailing, solo or not:-
Know your boat VERY well ,well enough to find things automatically,everything is different in the dark.
Make sure you have a secure place for your dinghy,one less problem, remember if it can go wrong it will go wrong.
Jack lines for if you need to go on deck and be tethered even in the cockpit.
Many ,including myself, believe in reefing down at dusk so there will be less need to do things in the dark.
Gps and chart plotters are marvellous but make sure you have a compass light as well.
These are a few points that come to mind but there are many others and most include planning and practice and as far as I am concerned think of everything possible that can go wrong and have a plan to cope with them.
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  #24  
Old 02-08-2011
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start small, plan big, if you get on OK you will find your own answers.
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  #25  
Old 02-08-2011
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I really enjoy sailing at night in Chesapeake Bay--it's a unique experience. However, doing this without a knowledgeable crew member would be asking for disaster. I've had close calls from barges that were well out of the channel, cargo vessels that were obviously not paying attention to their radar, and of course, sudden, unpredictable changes in weather conditions. While you're watching the stars someone needs to be watching the horizon. The scariest encounter I've ever had on the water was when a nuclear sub out of Norfolk was bearing down on me. The only thing visible was the conning tower and a huge, mountain of water it was pushing at 40 knots. I managed to get out of its way, but the wake it created was beyond belief. The boat rode up on the mountain of water, then slid down the back side. I was able to control the boat, but it was very difficult. Had I encountered this at night I sincerely believe it would have been my last night on Planet Earth.

Play it safe, take a young lady (or guy) that knows how to handle a boat in all situations.

Gary
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  #26  
Old 02-08-2011
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I'm usually the guy that would say "F it, I'll do the 500 myself". But my first crew position was a bit humbling and I've since taken all the cautionary notes by SN'ers much more seriously.

Two of us (a captain and I) were taking a boat south in the Atlantic this fall. Night came and we were to start our watches. I did my little 3 hours of sleep and then it was the captains turn. He went below and didn't return until morning.

The next day I was dead tired...completely worthless. It made that entire day very grueling.

The more crew the better on long runs.
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  #27  
Old 02-09-2011
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wow a sub doing 40 knotts....I gotta get one of those.


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  #28  
Old 02-09-2011
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wow a sub doing 40 knotts....I gotta get one of those.


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Getting the uranium to re-fuel that sucker is going to be tough and expensive.
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  #29  
Old 02-09-2011
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All reports from pervious offerings of this seminar are very positive. I am going; there may still be an opening or two...

Alertness, Performance and Sleep Optimization for Single-Handed to Fully Crewed Yacht Racing

April 9, 2011
9am - 5pm
at the Newport Yacht Club, Newport, Rhode Island

Presented by: Claudio Stampi, MD, PhD, Founder and Director of the Chronobiology Research Institute

Hosted by: Bermuda One-Two Event

The Chronobiology Research Institute in Boston, MA, conducts research on human alertness, biological rhythms and sleep, and runs Alertness, Performance and Sleep Optimization programs in industry and sports. Institute Director and workshop presenter Claudio Stampi is also very familiar with the requirements and constraints of offshore sailing campaigns, having participated himself in two around the world races, including the 1981-82 Whitbread as skipper of La Barca Laboratorio. He is pioneer of polyphasic (multiple napping) Sleep strategies and of leading research in this field, having studied Sleep patterns of, and worked with,the top oceanic skippers since 1980.

The tentative fee is $260 per person (but may be less), includes refreshments and lunch. This workshop is limited to 15 participants.

For seminar reservations, enroll by contacting Roy Guay: roy@royguay.net

Workshop Overview

Today, to win a race it is no longer enough to sail the best boat in town, secure a highly professional shore team, and be masters in sailing technology and strategy. To gain a truly competitive edge, skippers must focus on their own "design specs," also know as human factors. Races are won by those sailors capable of handling their own resources - of skill, stamina, determination - wisely. To achieve these objectives, the Chronobiology Research Institute has designed a four-phase approach: foundation, assessment, practice, and alertness routing. This workshop is phase I (foundation) of the program.

Specifically the workshop aims are:

* provide competitors with the basic knowledge and tools of fatigue management, including
- fundamentals of sleep-wake, alertness and circadian regulation
- state-of-the-art solutions and techniques for optimizing performance and alertness
- polyphasic and multiple napping strategies
- early detection of subtle signs and effects of Sleep deprivation, and countermeasures
* overview of current strategies employed in a variety of offshore sailing races
* methods to empower skippers and crew to manage fatigue risks
* examine and discuss pros and cons, costs and benefits of work-rest schedules and patterns previously adopted by skippers and crew
* evaluation possible strategies for upcoming races
* conduct detailed interviews with skippers and crew about their sleep-wake and circadian history.

The data that will be presented originates from the following races and skippers, among many others: OSTAR, Vendee Globe, Route du Rhum, Jacques Vabre, Around Alone, Ellen MacArthur, JP Mouligne, Giovanni Soldini, Mike Golding, Alain Gautier, Brad Van Liew
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  #30  
Old 02-09-2011
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Originally Posted by catamount View Post
All reports from pervious offerings of this seminar are very positive. I am going; there may still be an opening or two...

Alertness, Performance and Sleep Optimization for Single-Handed to Fully Crewed Yacht Racing

April 9, 2011
9am - 5pm
at the Newport Yacht Club, Newport, Rhode Island

Presented by: Claudio Stampi, MD, PhD, Founder and Director of the Chronobiology Research Institute

Hosted by: Bermuda One-Two Event

The Chronobiology Research Institute in Boston, MA, conducts research on human alertness, biological rhythms and sleep, and runs Alertness, Performance and Sleep Optimization programs in industry and sports. Institute Director and workshop presenter Claudio Stampi is also very familiar with the requirements and constraints of offshore sailing campaigns, having participated himself in two around the world races, including the 1981-82 Whitbread as skipper of La Barca Laboratorio. He is pioneer of polyphasic (multiple napping) Sleep strategies and of leading research in this field, having studied Sleep patterns of, and worked with,the top oceanic skippers since 1980.

The tentative fee is $260 per person (but may be less), includes refreshments and lunch. This workshop is limited to 15 participants.

For seminar reservations, enroll by contacting Roy Guay: roy@royguay.net

Workshop Overview

Today, to win a race it is no longer enough to sail the best boat in town, secure a highly professional shore team, and be masters in sailing technology and strategy. To gain a truly competitive edge, skippers must focus on their own "design specs," also know as human factors. Races are won by those sailors capable of handling their own resources - of skill, stamina, determination - wisely. To achieve these objectives, the Chronobiology Research Institute has designed a four-phase approach: foundation, assessment, practice, and alertness routing. This workshop is phase I (foundation) of the program.

Specifically the workshop aims are:

* provide competitors with the basic knowledge and tools of fatigue management, including
- fundamentals of sleep-wake, alertness and circadian regulation
- state-of-the-art solutions and techniques for optimizing performance and alertness
- polyphasic and multiple napping strategies
- early detection of subtle signs and effects of Sleep deprivation, and countermeasures
* overview of current strategies employed in a variety of offshore sailing races
* methods to empower skippers and crew to manage fatigue risks
* examine and discuss pros and cons, costs and benefits of work-rest schedules and patterns previously adopted by skippers and crew
* evaluation possible strategies for upcoming races
* conduct detailed interviews with skippers and crew about their sleep-wake and circadian history.

The data that will be presented originates from the following races and skippers, among many others: OSTAR, Vendee Globe, Route du Rhum, Jacques Vabre, Around Alone, Ellen MacArthur, JP Mouligne, Giovanni Soldini, Mike Golding, Alain Gautier, Brad Van Liew
It seems very interesting, but it is kind of faraway from me

I hope you can transmit us some knowledge after
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