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  #71  
Old 04-06-2011
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Actually one quick update. I've gone ahead and started the pieces around the new galley. As can be noted in the pics the area below the new cabinet is painted an awful rust red or burgundy or whatever. I've sanded enough of that crap to know that I don't want to sand that anymore. There must be about 3 layers of different paint on there, which is a shame because under it all is some nice ply as can seen in the bilge pic. I sanded all that it, it used to be a light cream colour as seen on the left of that pic or here:



and now looks like this:





A bit fuzzy.. but you get the idea.

Anyways, this time I decided to not even bother sanding it all off and hoping for the best and instead will just cover it up:



The last time I was there I scribed out the curve in the sole of the boat and the top is a straight 90 off of the ends. Simple piece, just have to do some varnishing. It's just mahogany door skin. Works well, looks good. That's just one quick coating of stain and a fast wipe off, really brings out the grain nicely and should look great varnished. Simple to apply, I'm not even sure I'll bother gluing it into place or just have the trim keep it on. I was thinking of making one more and painting it whiteish like the cabinet will be just to see what I like better. I'll think about it.. When I look at the renders I have a tough time deciding, might have to see about it when I get it in the boat.
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Last edited by GraemeInCanada; 04-06-2011 at 10:48 PM.
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Old 04-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraemeInCanada View Post
The last time I was there I scribed out the curve in the sole of the boat and the top is a straight 90 off of the ends. Simple piece, just have to do some varnishing. It's just mahogany door skin. Works well, looks good. That's just one quick coating of stain and a fast wipe off, really brings out the grain nicely and should look great varnished. Simple to apply, I'm not even sure I'll bother gluing it into place or just have the trim keep it on. I was thinking of making one more and painting it whiteish like the cabinet will be just to see what I like better. I'll think about it.. When I look at the renders I have a tough time deciding, might have to see about it when I get it in the boat.
NO! Glue it on!! Very important..

If it's just held there, moisture can collect between the skin and the door and rot it away from the underside.. not to mention that the air gap is a lovely place for mold to grow. When you do glue it, whatever system you use, make sure you exclude all air gaps. Don't ask me how I know..

Otherwise, looking good, Graeme!
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Last edited by Classic30; 04-07-2011 at 01:04 AM.
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Old 04-07-2011
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Nice work,an excellent example of a good quality posting. Keep it up.
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  #74  
Old 04-09-2011
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Good plan. I'll use contact cement then, thanks for the good reminder there.

Next set of updates:

It's been a very productive time for Stargazer's new galley. Lots to report so I'll get started.

Last we left off I had finished up cleaning everything and organizing the galley cabinet. The cabinet could come close to being fit but not perfectly without the actual ceiling in place (the wall). The angle and fit would change once it's in place and in turn I would then have to make more changes. The good thing is that I had it close, now I needed to get the next stage done.

First thing to do was take a before picture:



What a mess.. I'm looking forward to finishing and showing off a very clean interior.

Moving forward, it was time to get on with some repairs. As you can see in the water tank build post there was some very rotten plywood under the sink area. I cut that all out to be repaired and rebuilt:



I still needed a hatch there because my plumbing from the water tank and the electrical need to be accessed. So I made sure to make very straight cuts which got rid of the rot and left an area I could beef up to be repaired correctly. Once that was cleaned up I moved forward with getting the frames in place to put the cedar slats and vinyl covered plywood piece that would make up the new ceiling for the starboard side there behind the galley cabinet.





For those I used two pieces of cedar lathe which I ripped with a table saw on a 45 degree angle on the edges. Fiberglass can not go around 90 degree angles and it's important to make a gradual slope for it to climb up and over. Two rip cuts gave me a triangle if you looked at the pieces from their ends. From there I had to cut them into lengths that would fit on the hull. There is a piece of wood underneath the fiberglass on the inside of the hull. I'm guessing that was put in for strengthening and also in case you needed to attach something to the inside of the hull. Maybe. Either way, it sticks up about a half inch or so.

With each set of frames cut and ready I started to temporarily glue them in place with a hot glue gun. Being that they are cedar lathe, they're thing and they are a nice softwood that bends with the curve of the hull. Not a lot though so the bottom pieces on the aft side I ended up cutting in half and putting on, they just wouldn't bend that much and stick to the hull for the amount of time I needed to get fiberglass on and epoxy up. I remember one of the pieces I managed to get on came flying off the hull when the glue gave out after a minute or so.. launched a good 3 feet away actually.

So that went well and I got all the way to the end of the cabinet piece. If you look in the second picture there you can see I put two sets of frames quite close together. That's because that's where the cabinet ends and I want to put the seam from one piece to the next right there and hide it behind the piece of plywood that it going to go all the way up to the deck. Should work well.

Each frame is 20 inches away from the next one due to the size of foam I picked up. I got some closed cell 1/4" foam to use as a very basic insulation material along with some Reflectix, which is essentially aluminum foil bubble wrap. You may recognize it on your hot water tank maybe. The third gap is less, but that couldn't be helped. Hopefully I don't waste too much insulation doing the little bits. The reflectix will go against the hull and then the foam will go on top of that, it's about a half inch of insulation, I expect it will make a noticeable difference.

From there I went ahead and repaired that rotten area and made sure to epoxy up the ends of the wood I cut so that I don't have to worry about them rotting out any time soon. In the end I had some leftover epoxy to use so I coated the whole area in it just to protect it all. It'll get painted later so that won't look too odd I think.



Gives me a good opening to get my hands in to do anything to the plumbing or electrical. I left the hull bit open there so I could bring up the water line and electrical cleanly. I'll do some finishing work on that part once I'm done with everything else. It'll be hidden away in the cabinet anyways, no rush. Something to do while sitting at an anchorage maybe.

Last item on the list was to get those frames fiberglassed in. Fiberglassing is rotten work. If anybody asks you to come help them with fiberglass because it's fun or something is lying. Using epoxy for the job makes it that much more of a pain. Epoxy is FAR thicker that the usual resin that is used with fiberglass and in turn it's much hard to get to absorb into the fiberglass and stick. Takes a lot longer to kick off too and harden up. Up to 24 hours depending on the temperature. It does get goopy and thick quick though, so you can't just take your time. Epoxy seems to stick to everything except the fiberglass at first and it's a real pain to get the air bubbles out. Make sure you have the right tools.

For this application though, it didn't have to be perfect work. I just needed something to keep the plywood off the hull and have something to screw into to keep it all in shape. I'll do my best to hide those screws and in turn may not take advantage of all the frames, but they're there if I do need them and provide a nice rigid backing for the plywood, which is only 1/8" thick.



That's a long day. I also got a length of fiberglass on the front edge of the bulkhead there where I planed down to make it all even. Worked well and I was exhausted by the end of this day.

From here it's on with the measuring of the plywood so I can get the vinyl on it. I plan to paint the inside of the hull to just make sure that it's clean of any nasties that may possibly be on there still and provide just that one more layer of small protection to everything for condensation. Then do final touches on the measurements for the cabinet, build it, do the countertop, fit the stove and sink, build the cabinet doors.. painting some more, finishing work with mahogany and the shelves. Lots left.. but it's progressing well.
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  #75  
Old 04-22-2011
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Moving forward I've got another update on Stargazer's new galley refit. We left off with the frames getting fiberglassed in place and repairs being done. From here I brought in a 3 x 7 piece of 1/8" mahogany doorskin. This is what is going to be used to create the ceiling.

I had already cut it down to be about 56" (the length of the cabinet) and now that I had it in place I was able to do the fine tuning with the bend in place of the shape of the hull. If you remember I had 2 sets of frames right next to each other. This is because I plan on hiding the seam of the two pieces of ceiling behind a piece of 5/8" thick plywood which will make up the end piece of the cabinet and shelving. Should look pretty good.

Here's a pic of the fitting of the plywood. I had to cut a hole where the thru hull is but other than that it was some very small refinements on size which I primarily did with a hand plane:



Once deemed just about right to fit I took it out and trimmed a bit more to accommodate the vinyl that I'll be putting on and called it a day for that stage.

With that it was time to do some painting. I had to do a bunch of clean up first, but there aren't any pictures of that exciting action unfortunately. I did get some after paint pics though:









I've only done up to a certain point because I'm unsure of if the epoxy will bond well if there is a thin layer of paint in place and I haven't put the frames up for the rest of the hull to the aft end. I hope to do that once the galley is done. This coat of paint will remain at one coat and is essentially guaranteeing that anything that happened to still be alive on the hull is now dead and won't be growing back as this paint is a mildew resistant kind. With that, the whole area will be covered up with insulation anyways which should get rid of any air which in turn should get rid of any condensation which in turn should not allow anything to grow anyways.

Great progress. From there I did some final measurements for the cabinet pieces and I've got everything home to be worked on here. I expect to be able to take an almost complete cabinet back with me to the boat the next time I go. Install all the insulation, put the ceiling piece on (which will be covered with vinyl) and grab the final measurement for the counter top. I'll be sure to fill in all the little weird dents and empty bits in that bulkhead and give it a couple of coats of paint as I go to clean it all up.

I have a whole pile of things to do yet but it's coming along great. I'm also going to try to post up a few other updates I've done to the boat last year that I forgot to get on here. Altogether the boat is really looking nice inside. I have big plans for the port side too.. not this year though.
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Last edited by GraemeInCanada; 04-22-2011 at 10:06 AM.
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  #76  
Old 04-22-2011
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Moving on with the refit on the galley and pretty much the whole starboard side of the boat.. I got on with ceiling piece. First up was to get it cleaned up and then contact cemented. I did this indoors as it's just too cold to get on with these kinds of things in the garage (not heated) so with a tarp over top of the pool table that had plywood (ping pong table actually) on top of that, I got on with it all:



Getting the cement on the back of the vinyl fabric was a bit of a pain as it seemed to not spread nicely, at least not as nicely as plywood does. Either way, it was just a matter of time to get that spread on and dried out. With contact cement you have to apply it to both pieces, wait for it to dry out and then apply it.

A quick tip when doing this kind of work is to use wax paper to apply the pieces in stages. Contact cement is tough stuff, like a really nasty spider web, once the two pieces touch you're screwed and there's no going back. To assist in getting something like fabric on smoothly without wrinkles or bubbles I suggest wax paper. Here's a quick pic to help explain that:



As you can see, I've got sheets of wax paper the height of the piece. This way you can place the fabric or counter top, or whatever you are going to stick to another, in place and get it just right before actually having them adhere together. From here you just pull out the pieces of wax paper slowly from the middle out to the edges. As you pull a piece out you roll from the inside out to remove any bubbles or wrinkles and it allows the fabric, in this case, to stretch a bit and produce a really nice finish.

Once I was done one side I flipped it over to get the edges done. I overlapped on to the back just a little and made for a clean edge on all edges including the hole for the thruhull.





The finished product:



This piece is now ready to install in the boat right after I get the insulation in.
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  #77  
Old 04-22-2011
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Nice work on the vinyl. It is tough to lay a large span like that. I've done similar projects a couple of times, and learned about the wonders of 3M spray adhesive. Lay down your backing board, spray a 6" wide band down one end, when it starts to tack begin to lay down your vinyl, smooth it out, spray the next band, continue to layout the vinyl, smoothing as you go, and repeat as needed. I will never refinish the interior of a VW Westfalia again!
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Old 04-30-2011
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I'm not sure I would do it with a spray, I'd be too worried about it spraying all over the place. Contact cement is much cleaner but of course a bit more difficult for final placement.

Not a lot of action in this thread, maybe it's just gone on too long.. anyways one more update to see then:

I started on the cabinet for the galley with the actual plywood that I'll be using instead of that mockup stuff. I'm using 1/2 inch ply for the front and ends and inside cooler side, then 5/8 inch for the countertop and final aft end piece that will extend up to the deck.

A quick tip when cutting straight edges and you're not interested in using a table saw because a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood can be rather unwieldy is to use a guide. Essentially a straight edge that you can run your skilsaw or sabre saw down so it's straight and doesn't wobble, kinda like this:



In the end I got this:



Thanks to building that mockup it really gave me a great idea for placement of opening, size and height. Now I need to take it to the boat to fit in with the ceiling in place so I can get a proper size for the countertop. It'll all start to come together very very soon.

With that, I also started work on finishing the cabinet doors. I really wanted a nice finish to them and went with a mitered corner approach. I used a router to get the rounded edges and for the middle I used two pieces of 1/8 inch mahogany plywood. Essentially I wanted good 2 sides so I took them and used contact cement to glue them back to back to create a 1/4 inch piece to go in. I stained both sides to be a bit darker and then fitted them in a slot that I also routered into the mahogany frame pieces.

It was a heck of a lot of work to get the corners at a perfect 45 degree angle and I just about gave up but got it working and here they are. The piece of scrap I put on top is the original colour of the mahogany plywood, with the stain on I think the grain came out quite nice and they go well with the frames now:



Next step is all on the boat to get the insulation and ceiling into place, the cabinet fitted perfectly and counter top measured out right, the inside piece for the cooler measured, cut and fit and a few bits and pieces of prep work before final installation.

Once I had the majority of the carpentry done for the cabinet, it was time for a test fitting. Going all the way to the boat just for that would hardly be worth it so I managed to also get a bunch of other stuff done.

First up was to get the insulation in. I plan to get this on all parts of the hull but probably not this year, it's just too much work and I have to carefully divide my time up between family and work along with everything else. So to start out I put a layer of aluminum bubble wrap. At least that's essentially what it is.. but goes by names such as Reflectix or Reflecto or whatever.



I put it on with PL300, which is an adhesive safe for foam. This part isn't foam obviously, but the second layer is and I didn't want to take any chances. It's important (from all that I've read) to put on a proper bead of it around the edges. The idea is to make sure that air can't get in and out behind the insulation. This will keep the inside of the hull from "sweating" and creating the condensation that causes mold and mildew.

Here's a shot of the first section of the hull done. Essentially the part where the galley will go.



Next up is foam, 1/4" closed cell kind is sufficient for my purposes:



Same idea, glue it on, keep the air out. I had to leave that gap in the middle because there is a piece of wood there under the fiberglass. Obviously this is there to stiffen the hull a bit and give it strength and can also be used to attach things to. Handy idea.

Moving on, I put the piece of vinyl covered plywood in and attached it and fit the galley cabinet in:



A slightly different view:



Looks pretty good, fits well, no real adjustments to make. Next up was the final template for the counter top:



Another angle:



Due to having already worked out the angle for the most part from before, it was short work to get this bit finalized. All stapled together I loaded it into the car to cut the plywood at home. I fitted in my new plumbing/electrical hatch:



And took one final pic from the settee:



All in all I think it fits in great and is a huge improvement from the last galley. Lots more updates to come, this concludes this set of pictures though. Next up is the counter top and finishing work for the galley area in the boat along with the second part of the ceiling and related work to that.
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Old 05-01-2011
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Nice! Thanks for the updates, Graeme.

A small tip: If you have to do any work at all to the overhead (paint, running wires, fitting lighting, etc.) you'll find it's easier to do that now rather than wait until the cabinet is in place...
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Old 05-01-2011
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Looking good, graeme.
If I could offer a suggestion- see where the countertop template is sagging a bit? you might want to add a 2x2" joist to provide some support on that long span. Just run it across from cabinet face to hull ceiling, tied into a blind -screwed cleat on each end. Nobody will ever know it is there, but if the counter starts to sag, everyone will know it's NOT there.
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