I hate to do it, but I have an anchor question. Fortress anchors anyone? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-21-2011
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
wonk is on a distinguished road
I hate to do it, but I have an anchor question. Fortress anchors anyone?

My next major upgrade will be a new anchor. So far, my Oday 27 has survived on cheap danforth knockoffs with no real problems, but very little serious use. I mostly anchor in mud and weeds, and in a lake, so tides are not a problem... But shifting wind definitely is. Most people seem to look at the newest generation of spade anchors, either Rocna or Manson, but the conventional wisdom seems to be that they're the best at everything except mud. In mud, people seem to like the fortress anchors... is that correct?

I'm wondering if a fortress is worth it... It looks like the anchor I already have, is it really any different? I understand it may hold as well (or better) as a rocna or manson in the mud, but what about fouling? Is it more likely to foul as the wind shifts and it has to reset? I've read a lot, but it's hard to separate the hype from the reality...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-22-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 8,951
Thanks: 10
Thanked 135 Times in 121 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Minnewaska will become famous soon enough Minnewaska will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonk View Post
.......I've read a lot, but it's hard to separate the hype from the reality...
I would say impossible, not hard.

One of the real problems is that a test lab can not re-create every possible condition that Mother Nature might throw at us. Mud isn't mud isn't mud either. There is deep mud that will allow an anchor to bury. There is top mud, with rock a foot below it, where no anchor will set well. There is heavy washed out mud and there is loose decayed plant life mud in lakes.

If I was looking for an anchor to sleep through the night in unknown harbors and unknown bottom conditions, I would serious consider one of the new generation anchors. If I was looking for a lunch hook near my known cruising grounds, I wouldn't think too hard and just get what I already know has worked.

There is a Fortress rep on this board, who will give you more to consider, specific to your question. If I recall correctly, for a Fortress to work optimally in mud, you set the flukes at a greater angle. Which means you must either already know you are about to anchor in mud, or you make the adjustment after you have trouble setting.

I have a Fortress as my backup anchor, but admittedly, have never used it. That exercise is on my spring commissioning list.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-22-2011
pdqaltair's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 2,184
Thanks: 1
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 6
pdqaltair is on a distinguished road
I have a Fortress as a second and kedge and use it with some frequency, generally in tight spots. This is my 2nd boat with a Fortress, much better than Danforth, and I love it, but...

It's not really a primary anchor. IF power set in mud, hard, it is very unlikely to come out. If not deeply set, they come out too easily with a wind shift, and they will not reset if it does. I've had that happen; I was on the boat, expected it, and purposly waited to see if it would reset as an expereiment. It did reset, about 150 yards later.

The best answer? IMHO, a primary Manson/Rocna/Delta sort (I'm avoiding that debate) and a secondary Fortress.
__________________
(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-22-2011
TQA's Avatar
TQA TQA is offline
Bombay Explorer 44
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,558
Thanks: 0
Thanked 41 Times in 37 Posts
Rep Power: 6
TQA is on a distinguished road
I am happy with a vintage 45 lb CQR as my primary and have a Fortress 37 that I use as a kedge / stern anchor.

I spend about 350 days a year on the hook.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-22-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Before my current boat I used Danforth types exclusively with good success. the quality does vary. One difference is that the better (expensive) ones have bevelled edges on the flukes. The Fortress does. I use one now, but have only anchored with it a handful of times. I'm not convinced that all the old pattern anchors are bad, I use a CQR and the Fortress, I've no complaints.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 04-22-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: DFW Area
Posts: 228
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
bacampbe is on a distinguished road
I use a Fortress on my Bene31 on a mud-bottom lake for 2 seasons. So far, it's been excellent. It sets first time, and stays set. If anything, sometimes it buries so deep we have to work to retrieve it. It's lighter than most anchors with similar holding ratings, which is really nice since we don't have a windlass.

The biggest criticism I have heard is that it may "kite" in current or if the boat is moving. We get shifty and gusty winds here, but it's not that common to have a complete 180 degree swing except in conditions I probably wouldn't be out in anyway, so I can't speak to that.
__________________
s/v Dancing Days
Beneteau 31
Lewisville Lake, TX
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 04-22-2011
JimsCAL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Glen Cove, NY
Posts: 2,423
Thanks: 2
Thanked 35 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 8
JimsCAL is on a distinguished road
The advantage of the Fortress over a steel Danforth type is that the fluke angle can be adjusted to 45 degrees for better hold in mud. Like all fluke type anchors, it has problems in shifting conditions. The light weight can make initial setting more difficult. A good length of chain seems to help in that regard.

I cruised for 30 years on a Pearson 26 and then a Cal 9.2 with only Danforth anchors, anchoring out dozens of times each season in all kinds of weather. In spots where shifting currents or close neighbors require short scope, setting two anchors at 90 to 120 degrees apart provides increased security.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 04-22-2011
AdamLein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Coquitlam, BC
Posts: 1,866
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
AdamLein will become famous soon enough
I haven't heard that the next-gen anchors are anyhow inferior in mud. If you're planning on spending a lot of money on an anchor, I think you might as well go with the next-gen variety for its reliability in setting and resetting.

I have a Fortress clone called the "Viking" that is difficult to set and does not reset. The main difference between it and a true Fortress is the lack of adjustable fluke angle that has been mentioned elsewhere in this thread. I have had some scary close calls with dragging the Viking and have basically lost faith in the design. Here's what I've learned since then:

1) For soft mud, use the wide fluke angle and do an initial set at short scope.

2) You need a lot of power to set the flukes properly (my drags all happened when setting the anchor with no engine).

3) The security comes from getting the anchor really deep so that it doesn't pull out when the direction of pull changes, not through the anchor resetting. This may be somewhat controversial but I would probably not trust a Fortress to reset on its own after pulling free.
__________________
s/v Essorant
1972 Catalina 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 04-25-2011
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
wonk is on a distinguished road
Good info- thanks.

Last question- Which is better- a minimally sized Rocna/Manson, or a slightly oversized CQR or Delta?

I'm tempted by the Rocnas and Mansons, but there's no way I'd be spending enough to get more than the bare minimum anchor for my size boat (an Oday 27). For about half that money, I could pick up a 45lb CQR or Delta...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 04-25-2011
AdamLein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Coquitlam, BC
Posts: 1,866
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
AdamLein will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonk View Post
there's no way I'd be spending enough to get more than the bare minimum anchor for my size boat
You should probably make ground tackle purchasing decisions based on the cost of the boat, not the cost of the ground tackle.
eherlihy likes this.
__________________
s/v Essorant
1972 Catalina 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can two lighter anchors substitute for one heavy anchor? LoTech Gear & Maintenance 44 09-23-2008 11:37 AM
Fortress Aluminum anchors? deniseO30 Gear & Maintenance 10 07-21-2008 12:29 PM
Fortress anchor? saltypat Gear & Maintenance 19 07-14-2007 10:41 PM
Fortress anchors nauticalrich General Discussion (sailing related) 8 11-04-2002 03:47 PM
Anchors for anchor rollers Dana125 Gear & Maintenance 4 05-12-2002 09:37 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:59 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.