can sailing guarantee my safety? - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
If you want a safe past-time - take up knitting. Especially if 35 knots scares you.
Obviously, Mr. Omatako, you've never knitted in F9+ conditions. Freakin' scary. Let me assure you.


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post #22 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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I have a nice, plastic bubble I'm willing to sell you. Only one owner, lightly lived in by a nice, little boy.

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post #23 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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Obviously, Mr. Omatako, you've never knitted in F9+ conditions. Freakin' scary. Let me assure you.

I have and thankfully I'm alive to tell my story. In a few decades, I'll have my blog up and running whilst writing a book.

This post is made from recycled electrons

A ship in harbor is safe, but that's not why ships are built.

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post #24 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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As many have said, there aren't any guarantees. But here is something somebody said to me many years ago, which helped a total newbie:

Storms at sea are scary to consider. But imagine a bottle, with the top firmly on, in a storm. Is it going to sink? Would a bottle be at significant risk of sinking, or would it just get tossed around a bit?

In a bad storm, a well-designed boat all closed up is like that bottle. It is *very* tough to sink (in fact, many sailors simply wait out bad storms below - probably a bit scared and shaken up, but safe and dry). Now she may take a beating she may not come out of it so pretty - but like the bottle, there is no reason why she should sink.

Oh, yeah - and with modern communications and forecasting (assuming you aren't on a schedule) most people avoid storms entirely :-)

Go sail. You'll be risking more on driving to and from the boat.
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post #25 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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I think a boat that can drain its cockpit well, can close up its companionway and keep from flooding below if said cockpit is pooped, has an emergency rudder, a good storm sail and a solid attachment point for a series drogue, should come as close to guaranteeing your safety as anything you might do on land, including driving your car.

You do have to stay attached to the boat and have the patience to wait it all out, but that's up to you.


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post #26 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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A ship in the harbor is safe...

If risk is terrifying, if you can't enjoy battle, stick to coastal sailing in mild weather and reading about sailing off-shore. The books are more fun than the reality. Reality, though, brings rewards.

I'm not trying to be cute, but I can't see how the OP is going to enjoy sailing with deep worry. Yes, we all take safety seriously, but if we even ask for garentees, we are better off on the couch. This sounds like a person who is going to want rescue or to just get off when trouble starts. I don't want that person around and I would be angered at having to go get them.

So, the best answer would be to say "nope, no promises, you could die." People do.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #27 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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YouTube - Perfect Storm Rescues: Infant Saved at Sea

Check out above video. Does anyone know why the boat was abandoned? It was only 50 knots and what 20 foot seas. Seems a lot safer on the boat if they can get some sail down. Anyone know what happened to the boat.

In any case, a captain should be able to handle this situation without coast guard.

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post #28 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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Worsening conditions, in the path of a hurricane, a mother and newborn, and a 13 year old maybe.
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post #29 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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Worsening conditions, in the path of a hurricane, a mother and newborn, and a 13 year old maybe.
Maybe, but listen to the audio from Coast Guard, even they were not sure if the baby would live through the rescue. For the mother to jump into the ocean (off a floating boat no less) with a baby in here arms- I cannot imagine. Just holding the baby while in the water under those sea state conditions could drown the baby, or hypothermia (especially on a baby with a small mass and large surface area) could kill it. Maybe the sail was jammed and could not be lowered or removed. I would think a boat this size could deal with a hurricane (close up, get below, hold on, and run under bare poles). I would love to know more of the story, I tried to find more on the internet but no luck.
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post #30 of 73 Old 05-05-2011
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If you are going to close up and wait it out below, bare poles is not necessarily going to guarantee your safety. You want either a series drogue or a sea anchor to hold you perpendicular to the waves.


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