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  #51  
Old 05-06-2011
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Jenny?

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
I think you just need to get to the bottom of this and call Sailing and ask...

867-5309.
Smack ... tried the number and got somebody named Jenny ???? I think the right number is 724-5464 or wait ... maybe it's Beechwood 4- 5789
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  #52  
Old 05-06-2011
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Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
Hahaha..... This happens every time. OP has left the house.
You're right, the Lakers are gonna have a hard time coming back from 0-2. Dallas may just be too strong a team this year.
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  #53  
Old 05-06-2011
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Originally Posted by RonRelyea View Post
Smack ... tried the number and got somebody named Jenny ???? I think the right number is 724-5464 or wait ... maybe it's Beechwood 4- 5789
That's her. Good time?

Maybe sailing moved. Try Pennsylvania 6-5000.
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  #54  
Old 05-06-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Was that the incident that led to the "White Squall" film? That was nuts.

I'm sorry about your friend, case.
As another poster writes, the movie "white squall" was about the sinking of Albatross. Here is more information about Pride I from Wikipedia:

"" Historical incidentsThe Pride of Baltimore, a modern 137-foot (42m) schooner, was reportedly struck by a white squall on May 14, 1986. The 121-ton vessel sank about 240 miles (390 km) north of Puerto Rico, casting the surviving crew members adrift for five days. The Toro, a Norwegian freighter, picked them up at 2:30 a.m. May 19, 1986. An eyewitness of the account described it as follows:
"A tremendous whistling sound suddenly roared through the rigging and a wall of wind hit us in the back. The Pride heeled over in a matter of seconds. The 70-knot (130 km/h) wind pushed a 20-foot (6.1 m) high wall of water into the starboard side. She sank in minutes."[1]

A white squall was allegedly behind the sinking of the schooner Albatross on May 2, 1961.
A white squall is also believed to have sunk the schooner Hunter Savidge on Lake Huron in 1899.
[edit] In popular cultureStan Rogers wrote his 1984 song "White Squall" about the white squalls of the Great Lakes.
Ridley Scott's film White Squall tells the story behind the 1961 sinking of the Albatross. ""

There was no wreckage found from Pride I. I think she sank in water over 5000 feet deep, so any memorial with a mast is not from Pride I.

Interesting thing about Pride I is that she was on tour of the Mediterainian prior to sinking. Due to high level terrorist activity towards americans at the time, a decision was made to bring her back to the US. The Pride was owned by city of Baltimore. It was on this trip back she sunk. So trying to always reduce risk does not always work.

The original Pride I was designed as an exact replica of a Balltimore Clipper ship. These were designed to run British blockades prior to Revolutionary war. They were fast but also difficult to sail- very low free board. Originally the Pride I was to stay in the Chesapeake, but later the ship performed many ocean passages. The coast guard required the replacement Pride II to be designed to coast guard standards- much high freeboard and not really a true Baltimore clipper.

""A permanent memorial to the original Pride of Baltimore has been erected in the Inner Harbor on Rash Field. The memorial consists of the characteristic raked mast of a Baltimore Clipper along with the names of those lost in the tragedy carved into pink granite. The memorial reminds those who visit it of the precariousness of life at sea, a lesson the citizens of this great port city once knew well but had long forgotten.""

Last edited by casey1999; 05-06-2011 at 12:58 PM.
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  #55  
Old 05-06-2011
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To the OP i would , first go sailing, then see what questions you ask. You dont have to ever go near an ocean until you feel ready. I would actually say ocean crossing is easier and less nerve racking then coastal sailing.

To people you say lying ahull or even hove to is a way to see out survival storms, I say nonsense, very few boats can keep their occupants safe without active management and this is especially true of modern fin keelers. Im always suprised that often is husband and wife crews that seem convinced they can handle survival storms that way , it seems a mental crutch.

on a roll over, you will be dammed luckly to emerge with the rig attached, irrepective of the "preparation", virtually nothing built is so capable. Equally loosing a deck hatch etc can be terminal. Hence at all costs the boat must be managed to prevent knockdowns and rolls.

People who point to boats that have survived storms intact , with the crew lifted off even with deck striped of gear etc or make the " bottle in a storm" analogy simply havent experienced the inside of a boat in such conditions. Its almost impossible to prevent injury and the movement of the boat and especially a dismasted boat is so violent that sometimes it is impossible to inhabit. ( this is from a first hand account of a fastnet survivor to me)

Very few sailors meet survival storms , especially now with modern technolgies and the inbuilt caution that most normal recreational sailors have. WHen they do, its requires reseves of skill and experience and not really a check list approach.

Dave
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Old 05-06-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
People who point to boats that have survived storms intact , with the crew lifted off even with deck striped of gear etc or make the " bottle in a storm" analogy simply havent experienced the inside of a boat in such conditions. Its almost impossible to prevent injury and the movement of the boat and especially a dismasted boat is so violent that sometimes it is impossible to inhabit. ( this is from a first hand account of a fastnet survivor to me)
Dave
This is a good point. I am NOT disagree with you.

If the boat survive without human intervention during the storm, then the occupant can survive there too providing he or she securing themselves properly inside the boat below deck. Perhaps wearing helmet and body protecting armor like those used by the motorcyclists.

BTW, I thought about bringing my Helmet on board when sailing solo. I wear helmet for snow boarding or motorcycling, it seems logical to wear one in sailing. But I have never seen or heard anyone doing it. I bumped my head head hard many times when below deck.
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  #57  
Old 05-06-2011
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Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
BTW, I thought about bringing my Helmet on board when sailing solo. I wear helmet for snow boarding or motorcycling, it seems logical to wear one in sailing. But I have never seen or heard anyone doing it. I bumped my head head hard many times when below deck.
I saw one on a race boat - once.
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  #58  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
To the OP i would , first go sailing, then see what questions you ask. You dont have to ever go near an ocean until you feel ready. I would actually say ocean crossing is easier and less nerve racking then coastal sailing.

To people you say lying ahull or even hove to is a way to see out survival storms, I say nonsense, very few boats can keep their occupants safe without active management and this is especially true of modern fin keelers. Im always suprised that often is husband and wife crews that seem convinced they can handle survival storms that way , it seems a mental crutch.

on a roll over, you will be dammed luckly to emerge with the rig attached, irrepective of the "preparation", virtually nothing built is so capable. Equally loosing a deck hatch etc can be terminal. Hence at all costs the boat must be managed to prevent knockdowns and rolls.

People who point to boats that have survived storms intact , with the crew lifted off even with deck striped of gear etc or make the " bottle in a storm" analogy simply havent experienced the inside of a boat in such conditions. Its almost impossible to prevent injury and the movement of the boat and especially a dismasted boat is so violent that sometimes it is impossible to inhabit. ( this is from a first hand account of a fastnet survivor to me)

Very few sailors meet survival storms , especially now with modern technolgies and the inbuilt caution that most normal recreational sailors have. WHen they do, its requires reseves of skill and experience and not really a check list approach.

Dave
There are times when you probably would be more safe to close up the boat, run under bare poles, and strap you yourself down below. What if it is at night and you cannot see breaking waves to steer around? What if water temps are 33 deg F (or even 60 deg F) and a person cannot take the water and wind without going hypothermic and has reached point of exhaustion. What if the boat does roll, even a watch stander cannot prevent all roll overs. During a roll over would you be more safe inside or outside. I have read books and accounts by Jesse Martin, Jon Sanders, Jessica Watson, and David Dicks all doing single handed non stops circumnavigations in same boat as mine. They all used the tatic of closing the boat up and going down below and strapping in. They also all got rolled and survived as did their rig and this was in southern ocean. The previous owner of my boat used the same technique when hitting a storm in the pacific. I guess every boat is different but if I were faced with the same conditions, I would close her up and ride it out below.

Last edited by casey1999; 05-06-2011 at 02:48 PM.
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  #59  
Old 05-06-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
This is a good point. I am NOT disagree with you.

If the boat survive without human intervention during the storm, then the occupant can survive there too providing he or she securing themselves properly inside the boat below deck. Perhaps wearing helmet and body protecting armor like those used by the motorcyclists.

BTW, I thought about bringing my Helmet on board when sailing solo. I wear helmet for snow boarding or motorcycling, it seems logical to wear one in sailing. But I have never seen or heard anyone doing it. I bumped my head head hard many times when below deck.
I noticed Jessica Watson (16 year old single handed circumnavigator) used a helment (rock climbing) when going aloft at sea. Would be a good idea anytime you might get wacked by the boom.
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Quote:
If the boat survive without human intervention during the storm, then the occupant can survive there too providing he or she securing themselves properly inside the boat below deck. Perhaps wearing helmet and body protecting armor like those used by the motorcyclists.
try this at home, don all the protective gear you like, build a good strong carbon fibre box. Get into it, accelerate it at a solid object , do not emerge alive, note that the box is intact. Unfortunately carbon life forms are not as strong as boxes.
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