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Old 05-06-2011
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How does the catalina 25 behave in a storm

I'm helping a guy move his boat Catalina 25 from Cowesett RI to Madison, CT next month.
I've never taken this long of a ride on such a small boat. I did several moves last year but they all had at least a 10 HP diesel on a boat that was usually about a ton or two heaver for the smallest of the the boats.

I've been caught in thunder storms a few times and frankly never trusted the rig on these old junkers enough so we usually just dropped the canvas dieseled our way for an hour or so till it blew over.

I'm pretty sure the 10hp outboard wouldn't spend enough time in the water to help much. What has worked the best for you folks who sail under 5,000 lb boats. Needless to say I'll try to watch the weather and not be in it if possible but I'm wondering what you have survived and how.
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Old 05-06-2011
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I sailed a Pearson 26 from 1979 to 1989 form Glen Cove to as far as Cape Cod. I found that the outboard was OK as long as you kept the boat moving. A lower speeds with some chop the boat would pitch and the prop would be in and out of the water. At higher speeds, the pitching was reduced and the stern wave would keep the prop in the water. All in all not as bad as you think. In bad conditions, motorsailing with a reefed main is worth considering to keep the boat speed up.
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Old 05-07-2011
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The answer is easy, particularly if the condition of the boat isn't the best and/or the crew is inexperienced: don't get caught in a storm. Wait for good weather. Most bad things happen because folks are in a hurry to get there. The other answer is, how quickly can you reduce sail? In larger seas, an outboard will be out of the water half the time, so it's not something to be really depended on, but you already seem pretty aware of all this.
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Old 05-07-2011
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We sail a Lancer 25. About 4000 lbs loaded. 1300 pounds of keel, 30" draft. Last sail of last year we listen to NOAA. Next morning 7-8 foot seas, 25 knot winds from the north east and 20 miles to go. Nothing like the 4 foot seas and 10-15 knot winds from the west they fore casted. On the way home we sailed/surfed with motor and main with one reef. The picture REALLY doesn't do the day justice at all. It was hairy but fun. Boat handled fine. Motor came out of the water some, but we still made it fine. I'd say pack your oilskins and enjoy.

Don

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Old 05-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
I'm helping a guy move his boat Catalina 25 from Cowesett RI to Madison, CT next month.
I've never taken this long of a ride on such a small boat. I did several moves last year but they all had at least a 10 HP diesel on a boat that was usually about a ton or two heaver for the smallest of the the boats.

I've been caught in thunder storms a few times and frankly never trusted the rig on these old junkers enough so we usually just dropped the canvas dieseled our way for an hour or so till it blew over.

I'm pretty sure the 10hp outboard wouldn't spend enough time in the water to help much. What has worked the best for you folks who sail under 5,000 lb boats. Needless to say I'll try to watch the weather and not be in it if possible but I'm wondering what you have survived and how.


She's a reasonable boat, dude.
I admit I don't know the east coast very well, but isn't there plenty of places to take shelter should a storm come up?
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Old 05-07-2011
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David, I think you'll find your buddy's C25 rides a lot like your C30 under sail. If its outboard is a 'long shaft' version, you shouldn't have much of a problem in choppy conditions.

The 80-NM trip may take longer than you're accustomed to, as the C25 is of course a slower boat. Keep that in mind when encountering the tidal currents around The Race.
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Old 05-07-2011
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david, I don't know if you plan to make that an overnighter or a two day trip. Either way, LI Sound is fairly sheltered water and there are plenty of places to duck in on the north coast of it. And, excellent weathercasts. All you need is a 48-hour weather window predicting smooth water, say, calling for no more than 2' wave heights or 10-15 knots. A 25'er with an outboard in more than that, and you'll wind up slow, wet, uncomfortable, faster than anything else, especially if the weather decays and it becomes 2-4' with 20 knots. Which still needn't be dangerous, but certainly will be a more, ah, exciting ride.
Do read Eldridge, or get the tidal current charts, because following those can make a huge difference in your progress. And if you're staying out at night, the Sound can be a beautiful place to be--but keep a visual and VHF watch for barge traffic. That's a bigger danger than the weather in the Sound.
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Old 05-07-2011
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Thank you all. It sound like reefed main with motor on is the way to go. Anyone ever play with heaving to.
I thing the main problem with heaving to. Every time I've tried it it seems like by the time you roll up the jib to a small enough size the shape is so baggy it catches too much wind.
And of course I'm always worried about 30 year old rigging.
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Old 05-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puddinlegs View Post
The answer is easy, particularly if the condition of the boat isn't the best and/or the crew is inexperienced: don't get caught in a storm. Wait for good weather. Most bad things happen because folks are in a hurry to get there. The other answer is, how quickly can you reduce sail? In larger seas, an outboard will be out of the water half the time, so it's not something to be really depended on, but you already seem pretty aware of all this.
In theory you are of course exactly right. In reality however in New England the weather man says blah, blah, blah chance of thunder storms just about every day. If you are only 2 miles off the coast and you see a thunderstorm 20 miles out 80 percent of the time it veers off and misses you. For the 20 percent that you see are heading right for you you have a half hour before it hits. At that time it will take you a half hour to try to rush the harbor. When the guests hit 30 to 40 and viability is 0 is not the time I want to be in a 20' channel with rocks on both sides. It only last for 15 minutes and you have another 23 hours and 45 minutes to sail.

In short I think the weather report is great for real storms but they don't seem to predict thunderstorms at all.
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Old 05-07-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
david, A 25'er with an outboard in more than that, and you'll wind up slow, wet, uncomfortable, faster than anything else, especially if the weather decays and it becomes 2-4' with 20 knots. Which still needn't be dangerous, but certainly will be a more, ah, exciting ride.

The slow wet and uncomfortable part I know well.
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