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  #21  
Old 05-15-2011
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Jimmy Cornell's book on ocean routes recommends the near-shore route for summer trips...10 miles off, frequent weather reports and running for shelter well before the weather gets bad!

He warns of the shipping especially at the entrance to the Juan De Fuca so a radar/AIS would be very useful.

We have just fitted an AIS and on a recent 1,200 mile off-shore trip it was very useful, perhaps even more than the radar...but we were not in fog.

Phil
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  #22  
Old 05-15-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flybyknight View Post
Dear Lady,
It Is!
Bottom structure makes for some white knuckle wave heights and shapes.
Friend was on a 44' Pilot Boat that got slammed and wound up being spun around 180 degrees.

Dick
Here we go again..But not my thread so I'll leave it be.
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  #23  
Old 05-15-2011
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Shipping a 41ft boat on land is right on the bubble of being too long or too wide or too tall for shipping without special permits or escort vehicles. That may be why you are getting such varied feedback. A real professional outfit should quote it correctly in the first place. However, from my own experience, ground shipping can be a real hassle. Just coordinating all the different required labor can be frustrating. If you are a type A scheduler, I would avoid the experience. You will also wait and wait and wait to actually get your new baby on the water to sail her as you dreamed.

I like the idea of hiring a pro and doing the delivery yourself, however, one professional crew member is not going to comfortably allow you to press on 24/7. IMO, you will need two for that. If you hire a well experience Captain, they often have a mate with less experience and substantially less cost to bring along. If you have the time to stop in port often, then one pro will do.

If I wanted to get her home to sail, I would hire a crew to sail her home 24/7 and I may go along as an observer, more than participant. This way the boat is capable of moving at all times and you will still learn quite a bit along the way. The adventure would be fun, so if you want to make that your summer sailing, then do it with less crew and expect it to take longer.

Another consideration of a paid crew, is that a professional worth hiring is going to have standards for how the boat is equipped to be offshore: lifesaving equipment, redundant nav and comm, provisions, tools, spares, etc. They may bring their own, but these can add up if you don't think you need them when you get home. Some lifesaving equip can be rented.

Final thought, regardless of the mode of transportation, you should mentally prepare for the journey to take twice as long as any estimate. Weather and mechanical issues can and do slow down a passage on her bottom. Coordinating yard work at both ends and delivery trucks over land is both very frustrating and will often be delayed.

No absolute rights or wrongs here, its all feedback to help you make your decision. If you only want the least expensive option, that's the really hard question.
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  #24  
Old 05-15-2011
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You could always try the first leg to Ventura or Channel Islands Harbor, I believe slips are available both places, and there are good sized shipyards.
Brian Fagan's cruising guide would be a good start,
Amazon.com: The Cruising Guide to Central and Southern California: Golden Gate to Ensenada, Mexico, Including the Offshore Islands (0639785801825): Brian Fagan: Books
There are also a couple maps that show waypoints for three routes, Harbor hopping, inshore and offshore.
Amazon.com: Exploring the Pacific Coast: San Diego to Seattle (9781932310221): Don Douglass, Reanne Hemingway Douglass: Books
And
Amazon.com: Pacific Coast Route Planning Map, South Portion: Ensenada to Fort Bragg (9780938665946): Don Douglass, Reanne Hemingway-Douglass: Books
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  #25  
Old 05-15-2011
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Another option would be to break the trip up a little. Sail the boat up the coast until it starts getting too rough then haul and ship the rest of the way. The Pacific Coast in the Southern California area is a beautiful place to sail, it does not start getting really rough and unpredictable until you round Point Conception. On the first leg you can sail to Catalina or even out to San Clemente Island. From there you can sail the rest of the Channel Islands or sail a reach to Ventura or Channel Isle marina to haul and ship (I prefer VHBY in Ventura).

One of the reasons we moved from LA to Ventura was because of the sky high yard rates in LA. Decommissioning a boat in SoCal will likely cost around 2k, it will cost less than half that in Ventura and you can save even more if you are willing to prep the rig and do some of the work yourself. So, just sailing the 150 miles from San Diego to the Santa Barbara Channel could save you a couple grand in yard and shipping costs. Who knows, you could fall in love with the adventure and decide to sail the rest of the way home yourself.
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  #26  
Old 05-16-2011
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Another option is to hire a Captain thru OPO. He will get crew for free from OPO so all you would be paying for is the Captain. By all means try to sail at least part of the trip so you can learn the boat. Offshore Passage Opportunities: Halesite, New York.
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  #27  
Old 05-16-2011
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Denise,

A couple of thoughts as a delivery skipper myself (one of several at OPO which brokesailor mentioned). Personalities are important. Talk to candidate skippers and get a feel for how you and he or she will work together. It DOES make a difference for "owner aboard" deliveries. Most delivery skippers don't take passengers; if you are aboard you carry your weight. Not all are prepared to provide instruction, but many are.

A good skipper with untested crew will plan the passage with bail-out points, especially early on, so you are more likely to be tacking inshore for a while (a day out, half-a-day in, a day out, ...).

Quotes may come as $/mile or $/day. You can expect anywhere from $1/mile to $3/mile or $150/day to $500/day. To some extent you get what you pay for but there are some good experienced retired captains keeping their hand in at reasonable rates and some "paper captains" charging a lot. You'll have to try to sort them out. Note that experience and skill are much more important than paper certifications. Resumes are a good start but ask questions.

Some skippers do charge more for "owner aboard." Don't be surprised. At a minimum expect a discussion about who is in authority before you leave the dock.

One of the things new boat owners often forget or defer until too late is getting an EPIRB (if one is on the boat when purchased) properly registered to them. You may need a password from the previous owner but given that it can be fixed online in seconds.

Keep boat names straight - if you are changing the name of the boat make sure the USCG documentation application (you may not get the completed documentation in time) and the beacon registration and the name on the boat are all the same when you push off.

I'd be pleased to bid on your job if you like but coming from the East Coast it might be hard for me to compete with local guys. I'll be happy to hold your hand through the selection process though - maybe someday you'll be able to recommend my services to someone on this side of the country! *grin*

For DeniseO30 - I have yet to have an unpleasant experience on Delaware Bay. Things can get a little bumpy sometimes in a chop but not any different than Chesapeake in my experience. The NJ coast isn't a big deal either though.
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  #28  
Old 05-16-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Another consideration of a paid crew, is that a professional worth hiring is going to have standards for how the boat is equipped to be offshore: lifesaving equipment, redundant nav and comm, provisions, tools, spares, etc. They may bring their own, but these can add up if you don't think you need them when you get home. Some lifesaving equip can be rented.
This is a great point that I only alluded to before. A boat equipped for coastal cruising around SD and the Salish Sea, is not equipped adequately (IMO) for the trip up the West Coast. You can borrow/rent some equipment, but this is an expense to factor in.

I picked up on the fact that you are a HS teacher. If all of your crew have 2 1/2 months to make the trip, you may be OK, if you don't mind sitting in some harbor for weeks at a time waiting for a weather window. Factor in the costs of paying for guest moorage while you wait. With an unknown boat and rookie crew, I wouldn't suggest the Hawaii route even though it makes more sense in other ways.

To be honest, if I had your available time, I'd be very tempted to sail the boat up. However, that doesn't mean that it would be the wisest decision.

Another note, while many of the East Coast members have lots of coastal experience, most don't have experience on the West Coast. It may sound silly, but it is different.

Your going to love having your boat up here. The South Sound is wonderful, and with your work schedule, you will have lots of great summer cruising all the way into BC.

Dave
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  #29  
Old 05-18-2011
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We purchased a Beneteau 361 last fall in Noank, CT. I hired a captain, who's also my sailing instructor and also brought a friend. Four of us, and we brought her down to Oriental, NC. Best decision ever. It was a great experience, a fantastic working eductaion about off shore, boat mechanics, navigation, and most importantly, learning about our boat. It really did a lot for my confidence knowing what I and our boat can do as we went from Noank down the LI Sound, anchored right off the Throgs Necks Bridge waiting for the tide, down the east River , and out to the Atlantic to Norfolk. Experienced the ICW, Dismal Swamp Canal. It was just a fantastic trip so if you can get the change to do the trip with a captain you can work with and a friend or two, do it. Did I mention it was the best decision ever?
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  #30  
Old 05-19-2011
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my advice.

non sailor, non boat owner. (thus wannasail get it?)

If you are going to do it yourself be prepared for this These guys were headed south (or trying anyway)

YouTube - ‪vega1860's Channel‬‏

granted it was late in the season. So know how to heave to. If you have a good boat it will be hard trip but you can do it.

I like the idea of having a captain with a mate that you can learn from.

If you want a delivery captain here is one. Atom Voyages | Voyaging Around the World on the Sailboat Atom

James Baldwin. I know nothing about him except that he has done deliveries and circumnavigated the globe.
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