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  #11  
Old 05-30-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Adam, are you doing the RNSA to Nanaimo next weekend?
That is the one!

Quote:
Originally Posted by puddinlegs
If you're hoisting on a broad reach or downwind, as soon as the spinnaker is up, square back on the pole quickly, and it'll help fill the spin quickly.
Yup, that's the way I'd always done it before, always very successfully. But in much lighter wind. I may have a go tomorrow evening and I'll probably revert to this method as it's more familiar to me.
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  #12  
Old 05-30-2011
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FWIW, a couple of extra things for you to put on the list:

1. In heavier (ie. not light) winds, make sure you steer under the kite in the gusts - never let the boat round up.

2. Check that the spinnaker sheets are on the winches but not cleated before you hoist.

3. Don't tie stopper knots in the spinnaker sheets..
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  #13  
Old 05-30-2011
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Good luck in the race, Adam.... the first time I did that one I shredded our only tired old kite in 20+ knots SE off Pt Grey - and they wouldn't give me a rating break for the return leg!

It's an interesting race, the weather doesn't look too bad. Our son is doing it on his Catalina 36.. you may see him there.
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  #14  
Old 06-09-2011
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So, update: I did fly the chute in the race. Made sure to get the tack within inches of the pole before hoisting, and it worked like a charm. Although she did round up a bit when I sheeted in, but no big deal.

However I'm still having friction issues. The guy was pressed against the forestay and foot of the jib, before going over the lifelines or bending around two stanchions, not to mention two turning blocks on the windward side. I had to pull almost the entire sail out of the bag by hand in order to be able to haul the guy. Any thoughts on how to reduce this friction or a different way to hoist? I really liked having the bag next to the companionway but it shouldn't be this much brute force required to hoist a sail.
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  #15  
Old 06-12-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
So, update: I did fly the chute in the race. Made sure to get the tack within inches of the pole before hoisting, and it worked like a charm. Although she did round up a bit when I sheeted in, but no big deal.

However I'm still having friction issues. The guy was pressed against the forestay and foot of the jib, before going over the lifelines or bending around two stanchions, not to mention two turning blocks on the windward side. I had to pull almost the entire sail out of the bag by hand in order to be able to haul the guy. Any thoughts on how to reduce this friction or a different way to hoist? I really liked having the bag next to the companionway but it shouldn't be this much brute force required to hoist a sail.
Adam, where's the pole at this time?? It should be almost on the forestay during the hoist and poking out the front, to keep the guy clear of both the forestay and the jib - then hauled aft the instant the halyard monkey yells "home!".

After that, it should run straight back to the turning blocks. Any stanchions in the way are likely to get pulled out of the deck..
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  #16  
Old 06-12-2011
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If you're saying that the chute is hanging up when coming out of the bag, one way you can pack it is-

Place the head of the sail in front of you, run the tapes so that each clew is on either side of you, then grab handfuls of the sail and flake it towards the head.

Stuff the meat of the flaked sail into your launch bag, put the corners where they belong (assuming you have a sausage bag).

I have a cylinder bag with a metal frame to hold the mouth open. I do the flake method and just join the 3 corners together as the last thing to go into the bag.

Anyway, it seems to come out smoother than if I just "stuff it", even when running the tapes.
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  #17  
Old 06-12-2011
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Pole: a few inches off the headstay. On this particular occasion I had the pole fairly low, lower than the boom, so maybe the guy was being bent at too sharp an angle around the forestay. With the pole higher it would have been "poking out" a bit further. But I still would have had the guy running under the foot of the genoa.

Packing: exactly as bubblehead describes. However, the sail just barely fits in the bag.... maybe the bag is too tight?

Anyway I guess what I need to do is make a video of me packing the chute and another of the hoist, and you guys can tell me what I'm doing wrong.
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  #18  
Old 06-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Pole: a few inches off the headstay. On this particular occasion I had the pole fairly low, lower than the boom, so maybe the guy was being bent at too sharp an angle around the forestay. With the pole higher it would have been "poking out" a bit further. But I still would have had the guy running under the foot of the genoa.


Assuming headstay = forestay, don't you mean the sheet instead of the guy? How could the guy be under the foot of the genoa when the genoa is on the other side of the boat??

Having the pole set level would be a good place to start, but it sounds to me like you can't have your sheet/guys set up properly. Are you using tweakers?
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  #19  
Old 06-13-2011
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Hartley: I certainly do not mean sheet. With the pole to port and genoa to starboard, starting at the port quarter, the rigging goes: guy through turning block, through tweaker, through pole jaws, around forestay, under genoa, to spinnaker tack. The spinnaker bag is clipped in just ahead of the cockpit so that I can manhandle it if necessary prior to the launch while singlehanded.

The problem seems to be that putting it all the way back means I have to do a lot more manhandling then when I launch from the pulpit or foredeck.

As for the pole, it was level to the deck, just low.
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  #20  
Old 06-17-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Hartley: I certainly do not mean sheet. With the pole to port and genoa to starboard, starting at the port quarter, the rigging goes: guy through turning block, through tweaker, through pole jaws, around forestay, under genoa, to spinnaker tack. The spinnaker bag is clipped in just ahead of the cockpit so that I can manhandle it if necessary prior to the launch while singlehanded.

The problem seems to be that putting it all the way back means I have to do a lot more manhandling then when I launch from the pulpit or foredeck.

As for the pole, it was level to the deck, just low.
Okay, Adam. I think I understand now - and yes, that ain't going to work without damaging either kite, sheets/guys or pole!

The kite needs a clear run to the masthead, and there are basically only two ways to get it there: (1) under the genoa and (2) aft of the genoa. 1 = typical for big boats - launched from the foredeck/forehatch; 2 = typical for small boats/race boats - launched from the companionway. You need to launch it aft.

To launch aft, the guy should run as follows: With the pole to port and genoa to starboard, starting at the port quarter, the rigging goes: guy through turning block, through tweaker, around port side-stays, through pole jaws, around forestay, outside genoa and stbd side-stays and around genoa leech to spinnaker tack. Keep plenty of slack to avoid it interfering with the genoa shape on a reach - snug up against it is good. Sheet goes through turning block, through tweaker, above genoa sheet to tack. Halyard goes around outside of stbd side-stays and under boom to head when you are ready to go. Some people clip all the lines together at the stbd side-stays on the beat to the mark.

Hoist as normal - pretend it's going up behind the main - with pole in the normal position (not lowered). To get it down you can either 'letter-box' it or just haul it in under the boom.

Aft hoists are used a lot on small/medium racing yachts (and even some large ones) simply because it's safer and faster than sending someone onto the foredeck - particularly if you're short-handed.

Hope this helps for next time!
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Last edited by Classic30; 06-17-2011 at 03:29 AM.
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