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  #21  
Old 06-24-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeWhy View Post
There are many ways to build a sailboat. Of the many ways to do it, finishing school has to be among the very best. The perks aside -- college girls; college sailing programs -- you don't have to commit too early. Nobody gets rich building sailboats. Keep a few options open. Finish school. Buy your boat, hopefully not built by the lowest bidder fumbling through his first attempt.
It's interesting what folks read into a sentence. Where did that come from?? Who said anything about building a sailboat?

And how does living on a boat stop one from developing your mind, going to college, getting a great job, running for president?

Having said that, I agree with most of the sentiment above. Life was great when I lived with my folks. Stay there for as long as you can and if there are things that you want to do that you can't do at home, take your girlfriend to the boat for as long as it takes. Then go back home.
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  #22  
Old 06-24-2011
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ya i just kinda ingonored that about the boat building i'm not looking to build a boat. just live on one.
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  #23  
Old 06-25-2011
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Living aboard a small boat has it's benefits, but it is a lot like camping. If you can live a tent for a week and love it.....

Then you will enjoy living aboard a boat
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  #24  
Old 06-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
Just wanted to point out. Spooning is great with the rocking motion of the boat. But the pumping during close encounter is always out sync with the boat rocking motion. May be others have better luck or I need more practices.
Hijack alert: A few weeks ago my GF came to Newport to sail back w/ us after the race. Got a little squally the first night out. I was in the single settee berth w/ the lee cloths up. She came over, wedged herself in w/ me (very snug) and we both fell asleep.
That boat could have been knocked down 90 degrees and we wouldn't have gone anywhere!
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Old 06-25-2011
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Either college or Navy sounds like a good choice. I did 4 years in the Navy on a submarine then got a two year college degree. I now own a couple of small taxi businesses and still drive cab on call from my house 80 hours in 5 days. I've got a family now. Because of the bum economy in the US , college grads right now are struggling and competing hard with each other for jobs. Maybe the Navy would be a wise choice. I am so happy that I served. Living in the small boat is a nice idea as long as you are not squandering your youth neither going to college nor starting your own company or branding your own product or service.It would be far cheaper than renting a small apartment waterfront. I lived in the back of a 4 cylinder pickup with a shell then graduated to a 4 cylinder Toyota Dolphin motorhome later on during college. I never once paid even one penny of rent after I got out of the Navy until I got married and bought my first home. This was called boondocking and I did it for 2 years. Now I am working towards paying off 3 houses. If I can keep up this pace I should be mortgage free at age 57. Be industrious as you enjoy living on the boat- don't squander your most energetic years. I squandered 8 years and only worked driving cab 1-2 days a week after my 4 years in the Navy. I am still glad that I went to college even though it was not necessary for owning cabs and properties. Just do something productive. Don't ever get a woman preggers unless you are in love with her and willing to marry her and be a good father to your children. Don't become a deadbeat Dad. I was the breadwinner at age 12 so nose to the grindstone work has served me well. If you are a lazy bum when you are young you may live like a bum when you are older because you weren't fruitful when you had the most energy. I don't think that living on the sailboat is a bad idea, I think it is a good one. Then you can sail anytime you want, even after work in the summer. Good luck
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  #26  
Old 06-25-2011
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you could spend you life aquiring burdens

As Curtis recommends, but I would vote against it.
If you want to live aboard in a harbor or marina, then you can live just like on land, get any kind of education or job that appeals to you and still have waterfront property on all four sides and no lawn to mow.
We old geezers have made a lot of assumptions about you from one brief post. Do you mean you want to cruise? Get a copy of Annie Hill's Voyaging on a Small Income. She, (with a couple of husbands) has cruised hundreds of thousands of miles with very little money. Today, in her mid or late fifties she lives in New Zealand, on or very near her small junk rigged boat Fantail. She still doesn't have a lot of money but she's as happy as most people and happier than many. (She's a regular poster on junkrigassociation.org, as am I.)
Lyn and Larry Pardy, Cap'n Fatty Goodlander... there are many people spending their lives cruising. Me, I'm an old f*rt dragging around too much baggage and gaining nothing from most of it.
P.S. If you do get Annie's book, please buy a legit copy of it from Amazon or somewhere, or at least get it from tor library if they have it. That's free and still honorable. Her text has escaped into the wild on the internet and can be downloaded for free. She did the work and deserves the royalties.
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Last edited by junkrig; 06-25-2011 at 03:25 PM.
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  #27  
Old 06-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
Hijack alert: A few weeks ago my GF came to Newport to sail back w/ us after the race. Got a little squally the first night out. I was in the single settee berth w/ the lee cloths up. She came over, wedged herself in w/ me (very snug) and we both fell asleep.
That boat could have been knocked down 90 degrees and we wouldn't have gone anywhere!
Well…. if you gonna hijack this thread, at least you should finish your story. Something is missing between wedged herself and fell asleep. It does not take a rocket scientist to realize that
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Last edited by rockDAWG; 06-25-2011 at 08:14 PM.
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  #28  
Old 06-25-2011
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"and when you are 18, go to college and get a good education."
A college education can be useful but you can also save $100-200,000 by skipping it and apprenticing as a plumber or an electrician and earning money in those years instead of spending it. More money than most college grads will make, unless they go on to advanced degrees or running businesses instead of being employees in offices. Or McD's.
Which is not to say there's any one best path--just that there are many options to consider. A good trade, which doesn't have to compete with Indian IT workers overseas. Or the military. Sure, people try to kill you but the benefit packages can actually be pretty good. And there just MUST be some military program that trains plumbers, too.

Living on a boat kinda precludes the college residential dorm experience and restricts your choice of colleges to those near boats. A good plumber can always take four years off and get the degree later.

The economics of living on a boat, much less owning one? I wonder what a Statistics-101 class could dig up on that, and how widely their numbers would diverge. "Your mileage may vary!"
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  #29  
Old 06-25-2011
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Ok I just wrote like 5 pages then deleted it, since what you were really asking is: "I want to live on a boat when I am 18, how do I make that happen?"

I was a marine mechanic for 5 years and I can tell you that is the best job for a person living on a sailboat, you can basically live at your work so you don't spend money getting to work, and usually as an employee at the marina you will get a cheaper slip rental with good opportunities to buy a slip.

Something to understand about the marine industry is that you don't have to go to a school ahead of time. Once a dealer has paid their yearly dealer fees, they can send their techs to school for free at the manufacturer training sites, along with a lot of online and at dealer training. The hardest part is getting your foot in the door to get a job at a marina.

You will want to move, unfortunately you will have to be in an apartment for the first part of this plan. You need to be living near the areas where the training centers are located, ideally Mercury marine since they do I/O's and inboards and those huge pod drives now, along with the traditional outboards. As I recall they are all in Georgia, Keenesaw is Yamaha, I forget where mercury put theirs. There are other training sites like the ones in eastern WI but those only do limited stuff.
The reason for moving near the training site to find a dealer to work at is so you can drive to the classes every day from home, that means that the dealer who has already paid their yearly dues, can send you for free, even if you are just an entry level boat washer or something. If they had to pay airfare or hotel or basically anything, they probably wouldn't bother.
The classes start very basic (fundamentals of 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines, electrical theory) so you don't need to really know anything ahead of time, but it really helps to have basic mechanical experience.
Once you have been to enough classes you can move into a mechanics position. I have found that only by being a marine mechanic can you learn to be a marine mechanic, it takes years of experience. Once you have maybe 5 years of experience and lots of certifications, you will be able to move around to the marina of your choice.

As far as a boat goes, move up to a 22 footer that is trailerable next, they can be had for pocket change or free if you are very patient. Fixing a worn out but complete boat isn't expensive, its very cheap, its just super labor intensive and most people don't have skills.
Don't bother going any bigger and just save up until you are ready to move onto a boat (good mechanic job and live aboard marina) then get something 30+ feet that is nicely equipped and has a design you can live with.

DO NOT LIVE WITH ANYONE ON A BOAT. That's my best advice unless you have lived with someone in a one bedroom apartment (or better yet a studio apartment) for years and know it works, plus it would have to be one of those rare females that likes the crude sailboat life since you cant live in a space that small with someone you're not sleeping with.

So to summarize how to make your dream work:
1. Beg your way into any job at a marina that is a Mercury repair center that pays enough for you to get an apartment with a roommate or something. Must be near the Mercury Marine training facility so you can convince them to send you to the part of week or week long classes for free (probably with no pay). Negotiate that point before you are hired and tell them you want to eventually be a mechanic. Ideally you want the marina to be a place on the water with a ramp and parking so you can trailer sail for free, but if a land locked repair center is all you can get it will do.
The alternative to mechanic would be to find some way into the fiberglass and gel coat repair world at a marina with slips, but that's a foreign country to me.

2. Do whatever sailing you want and can afford until you have made it into a mechanic job and done it for a number of years with the appropriate training certifications. Then save up and pick out a nice 30+ foot boat.

3. Take your good job and if the marina you started at isn't a good place to live aboard, move to a place that is and work where you live.

Sounds simple enough eh?
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