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  #21  
Old 07-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninefingers View Post
......I think a line attached to the midship cleat and then wrapped around the mid dock cleat is the best idea. Very easy for inexperienced crew to manage. There's a lot of canvas on the boats, so it would be hard to cleat a line handed to you from the end of the pier to the mid cleat on the boat. I think you'd get tangled up somewhere along the journey back to the wheel!........
I suppose if you are single handing, it is more difficult.

However, to correct a misunderstanding, the dock line is pre-tied to the correct length on the dock with a spliced eye that is just dropped over the cleat on the boat. Couldn't be simpler. If you have a helper standing on the boat next to the midships cleat, they can be handed that line as midship passes the front of the dock. Just continue to back in idle reverse. The moment that forward spring line become taught, you will be pinned against the dock.

If you are alone, just try to stop the boat at the same spot, drop the eye over the cleat and return to the cockpit and put her in idle reverse. The only way that would be an issue is if you have another boat that is close on the other side that you might drift into during those few seconds. But once that line is taught, nothing will matter.... not prop walk, not rudder position, nothing. You will be snug up against your dock.
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  #22  
Old 07-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minnewaska View Post
if you are alone, just try to stop the boat at the same spot, drop the eye over the cleat and return to the cockpit and put her in idle reverse. The only way that would be an issue is if you have another boat that is close on the other side that you might drift into during those few seconds. but once that line is taught, nothing will matter.... Not prop walk, not rudder position, nothing. You will be snug up against your dock.
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  #23  
Old 07-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
If you have a helper standing on the boat next to the midships cleat, they can be handed that line as midship passes the front of the dock. Just continue to back in idle reverse. The moment that forward spring line become taught, you will be pinned against the dock.
What is a safe speed to do this? Anything over 1 knot would put a lot of stress on the cleat wouldn't it? Or will the lines absorb the shock?
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Old 07-23-2011
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Originally Posted by Ninefingers View Post
What is a safe speed to do this? Anything over 1 knot would put a lot of stress on the cleat wouldn't it? Or will the lines absorb the shock?
The same speed at which you should be docking. No faster than you are willing to hit something.

Also, unless you are precisely against the dock when the line becomes taught, you will actually pivot like a pendulum, which reduces the shock load as well. This is not a dramatic procedure.
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  #25  
Old 07-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketucker View Post
Denise - bow first is an option if conditions are extreme, but I'm not the owner (shared/fractional boat through SailTime) and the preferred way to leave the boat is stern-in. All my practice has been backing in, so I'm actually more confident going stern first at this point.

Rob - lines are stored on the boat. As mentioned above, not my boat, and there aren't enough spare lines aboard to be able to tie up elsewhere if I leave lines on the dock.

Barquito - a line at the mid-ship cleat is a great idea. I forgot I did exactly that in October last year when the winds were high and had my crew member use that line instead of the bow line when stepping ashore. I'll remember that for next time, and also remember to clearly communicate to anyone on the dock that I want them to take THIS line please, not the stern line, and tie it to THAT dock ballard.
I would suggest leaving the lines on the dock and putting a spare set in a carry on bag that you can take home with you, OR... ask the people at the company why they could not spring for a back up set and leave the lines on the dock like most folks do?

Even if you leave lines on the home slip it won't help you docking someplace else. Here is what I do when docking with lines on board:

It's called walking the dog I take a spring line attached to the boat near the shrouds and a bow or stern line (depending on the situation) with me as I step off the boat onto the dock. All I really worry about is getting my boat to a stop or near stop so that I can safely step off from the cockpit or amidship. When I stop off I have both lines in my hand. I then walk the boat forward or aft to the position on the dock where I would like the boat to stay.

The spring line stops the boat from any further motion and pulls the beam to the dock. If the beam is snug on the dock, obviously, the bow and stern cannot be far off the dock. I tie off the spring line slightly for or aft depending on wind or current. Then tie off the bow or stern line.

You will find that unless the wind is blowing directly over your beam pushing you off the dock that you have one lazy dock line, either the bow or stern. You just have to figure out which one should be lazy before you dock and that is the line you don't take with you (bow or stern) when walking the dog.

If the wind does happen to be blowing the boat off the dock then the spring line can be tied off nice and short, 90 degrees off the beam doing most of the work for you.

Now can someone please tell me how I can easily single hand my boat into a slip that requires a stern in tie up with four pilings and no floating dock?
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Old 07-24-2011
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Originally Posted by RobGallagher View Post
......Now can someone please tell me how I can easily single hand my boat into a slip that requires a stern in tie up with four pilings and no floating dock?
Before you leave this slip, take a line with the eye laid over your midship cleat and tie it the the forward piling at the correct length. Repeat on the other side. When you leave, pull the eye off each midship cleat and place it on the piling (they typically have a cleat for this). When you return, stop the boat with midship abeam the forward piling. Grab the line with your boat hook and lay it back over the cleat on each side. Put her in idle reverse and you will snug right up where you started.
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  #27  
Old 07-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Before you leave this slip, take a line with the eye laid over your midship cleat and tie it the the forward piling at the correct length. Repeat on the other side. When you leave, pull the eye off each midship cleat and place it on the piling (they typically have a cleat for this). When you return, stop the boat with midship abeam the forward piling. Grab the line with your boat hook and lay it back over the cleat on each side. Put her in idle reverse and you will snug right up where you started.
First of all, sorry to HiJack this thread.
Second, thanks Minnewaska for the reply.
I'm gonna start another thread because I have more questions about docking to four pilings short handed.
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Old 07-27-2011
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The first time I singlehanded anything of size, I was more than happy to have some help when I came in. About 6 months after I took the ASA 101 basic keelboat class, I started getting worried that I was going to forget what I had learned, so I went down to the lake and rented for the day the very same Catalina 30 that the class had been taught on.

Long story short, the sun went down a little quicker than I expected and I ended up navigating my way back in around 9pm, slipping past the wrong side of a low water marker along the way. I probably would have been alright, but by the time I found the slip, I was so mentally exhausted that I all I felt was relief when a couple guys jumped off their boat next door, set down their beers, and guided me in.
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