Just took a sailing class and I really do not like dinghy sailboats. Go bigger? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-23-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 35
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Mr.Ritz is on a distinguished road
Just took a sailing class and I really do not like dinghy sailboats. Go bigger?

It really makes me feel like I am being spoiled by wanting to dump the honda civic and move up to a Caddy but the experience was so bad. It is just that the boats are horrible to sit in as someone 6'1 200 pounds. Not to mention I baked my legs in the sun which I have never done before. Everything was ultra hot from the touch. This is my fault but it sucked.. I spent most of my time in the grass stuck.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 07-23-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 35
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Mr.Ritz is on a distinguished road
It was a sunfish by the way
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 07-23-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 8,264
Thanks: 6
Thanked 89 Times in 86 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Minnewaska will become famous soon enough Minnewaska will become famous soon enough
Absolutely, move up to a keel boat if that is your plan anyway. Dingies are definitely harder to sail and less comfortable. Sailboats and airplanes are the same in this regard. The bigger each gets, the easier they are to sail/fly, unless something goes wrong. Just don't exceed your troubleshooting ability. A small keelboat is nearly as simple as the sunfish.

P.S. Yes, a jet is easier to actually fly than a single prop trainer, until something goes wrong.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 07-24-2011
dhays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: University Place, WA
Posts: 626
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
dhays is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Absolutely, move up to a keel boat if that is your plan anyway. Dingies are definitely harder to sail and less comfortable. Sailboats and airplanes are the same in this regard. The bigger each gets, the easier they are to sail/fly, unless something goes wrong. Just don't exceed your troubleshooting ability. A small keelboat is nearly as simple as the sunfish.

P.S. Yes, a jet is easier to actually fly than a single prop trainer, until something goes wrong.
I'm going to disagree a bit.

I think that rather than give up on dinghies, you should find yourself another dinghy to sail. The Sunfish is not the most comfortable boat to sail. There are a lot of other small dinghies in the 13-18 foot range that are more comfortable and will still give you the sailing experience that is so valuable.

I think that almost everyone would benefit from learning to sail in a small dinghy, just as I think that every pilot should first learn to fly in a small plane. Sailing in a dinghy helps you develop a sense of the boat the same way flying a Cessna 150 gives a pilot the feel for "stick and rudder" flying.

You certainly can go to a keel boat sooner, but in the long run you will be a much better sailor (IMO) if you get some dinghy experience beforehand.
__________________
47*20'11.7" N
122*35'20.8" W
S/V Legacy, Catalina 400 MkII, Hull #328
My Blog on
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by dhays; 07-24-2011 at 11:05 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 07-24-2011
wingNwing's Avatar
formerly posting as eryka
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: aboard s/v Cinderella
Posts: 1,123
Thanks: 5
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 6
wingNwing is on a distinguished road
The first thing I'd do, is go for a sail on a significantly bigger boat. It could be as part of a class, a charter, or just as a guest for a daysail. You want to figure out if you don't really like *sailing,* or just don't care for *dinghy sailing.* Take some time to compare what you learned on the little boat and see how it scales up to the big boat. Then decide.

I'm going to go against the conventional wisdom on this site - which says to sail dinghies, then medium boats, then bigger boats - and agree with Minne's advice. If you don't like sailing dinghies, don't sail dinghies. If you enjoy sailing bigger boats, sail bigger boats. Your learning curve will be different, maybe slower with respect to learning what each individual control of the shape of the sail does to the boat's speed and balance in varying wind conditions. You might have to do more book and classroom learning to make up for what you might learn in the dinghy, but you can still get to a respectable level of sailing competence if you want to. Of course, you'll miss the spontaneous dunkings that come with learning on a dink.
DRFerron likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Cinderella, CSY 33, Photo by Joe McCary

Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sidney J. Harris


Shameless self-promotion - my blog for the Annapolis Capital newspaper:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
still has some glitches to be worked out. Until then, I'm posting at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
and
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
! And a new project:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 07-24-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 8,264
Thanks: 6
Thanked 89 Times in 86 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Minnewaska will become famous soon enough Minnewaska will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
I'm going to disagree a bit.

I think that rather than give up on dinghies, you should find yourself another dinghy to sail. The Sunfish is not the most comfortable boat to sail. There are a lot of other small dinghies in the 13-18 foot range that are more comfortable and will still give you the sailing experience that is so valuable.

I think that almost everyone would benefit from learning to sail in a small dinghy, just as I think that every pilot should first learn to fly in a small plane. Sailing in a dinghy helps you develop a sense of the boat the same way flying a Cessna 150 gives a pilot the feel for "stick and rudder" flying.

You certainly can got to a keel boat sooner, but in the long run you will be a much better sailor (IMO) than if you get some dinghy experience beforehand.
I respect your opinion. However, I think if you never sailed anything smaller than a J24, you would still learn to become a very good 'stick and rudder' sailor.

Many, maybe most, of our military pilots never sat in a piston driven single engine plane. Their first trainer is a turbo prop, which is considered a seriously advanced machine for the average private pilot that begins in that C150. Of course, to be in the program, one must have above average aptitude, but I'm only saying that not everyone must start at the absolute bottom.

In my humble opinion, a J24 or a Colgate 26 are excellent trainers (the later of which is used by the Naval Academy to teach midshipmen who've never been in a dinghy sailboat).
wingNwing likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 07-24-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 174
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
HPLou is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to HPLou
Definitely try the bigger boats. At least there will be room for the cooler without the worry of hitting your knees when you are reaching for a cold one. Enjoy and good luck.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 07-24-2011
dnf777's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 319
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
dnf777 is on a distinguished road
Try a bigger boat, and also try another dinghy, if you want more time in a small boat.
My Prec-15 is quite a bit more comfortable than a sunfish, and good for learning basics.

Having said that, I much prefer a larger keelboat for a relaxing day on the water.

Sailing has multitudes of niches....you happened to find one you don't enjoy.
arknoah likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 07-24-2011
Sublime's Avatar
Quirky
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: North Texas
Posts: 507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 4
Sublime is on a distinguished road
There's other larger dinghies to sail and dinghies will accelerate your learnings.

I know a guy about your size who loves his flying scot. There's larger lazers you can sail.

If you don't like it, then you don't like it. It's all about finding a boat you like. You can hate to sail dinghies but love to sail keel boats. But don't give up the potential education a dinghy boat can give over one boat.
__________________
This post is made from recycled electrons

A ship in harbor is safe, but that's not why ships are built.

My girls:
1974 Alcort Minifish-Minifish
2001 Drascombe Lugger-Penelope
2004 Hunter 260-Miss Muffet
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 07-24-2011
dhays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: University Place, WA
Posts: 626
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
dhays is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
In my humble opinion, a J24 or a Colgate 26 are excellent trainers (the later of which is used by the Naval Academy to teach midshipmen who've never been in a dinghy sailboat).
I certainly understand what you are saying and I'm not trying to imply that someone can't learn to be an excellent sailor without dinghy experience. I started sailing dinghies when I was 5 years old and sailed and raced everything from 9' Mintos to Thistles and Lightnings. However, there are a lot of sailors who have never sailed a dinghy who are much more accomplished sailors than I.

I spent a lot of time sailing (and some racing) in San Juan 21s and San Juan 24s. FWIW, I think there is a huge difference between a 21 and 24 foot boat. So, while a J24 would seem like a dinghy compared to either of our current boats, a smaller boat such as a Cal 20, Catalina 22, or San Juan 21 would be better I would think. I'm sure there are other boats in the 20 foot range that I'm not aware of as well.

Still, nothing beats the experience gained (or the ab work) of sailing a dinghy on a day with variable wind for really internalizing the concepts of wind, waves, weight, and water.
__________________
47*20'11.7" N
122*35'20.8" W
S/V Legacy, Catalina 400 MkII, Hull #328
My Blog on
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking For An Evanson Robin 11 Foot Sailing Dinghy One Design Class Sailboat SABALMINOR Gear & Maintenance 16 10-01-2012 11:03 AM
Sailing on bigger boats BlueWaterMD Seamanship & Navigation 28 06-18-2009 10:35 PM
Spain. Zwitserleven Sailing Team Booth/Dercksen in the Tornado class at the Princess Sofia Trophy @ BYM Sailing News NewsReader News Feeds 0 04-14-2006 03:17 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:56 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012