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Old 08-11-2011
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Need more BTU in the Galley

I hate to compromise when comes to food and eating good. The burners that installed in the most sailboats are just so anemic. It is not really able to cut it. I think most of them are less than 7000 BTU or may be even less. I got spoiled by the 22,000 BTU Garland stove with a 2700 cpm exhaust system. I want more BTU's and better exhaust system.

Anyone out there upgraded their galley for a better living condition?
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Old 08-11-2011
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I presume would you be pumping more fuel as well and run out faster. That's a limiter for most.

I have no issues sauteing or frying, but it does take some time to boil water. I would buy a pressure cooker and leave the stove top alone.
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Old 08-11-2011
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What kind of cookware are you using that requires so much heat? I'm on a smaller boat, so space is at a premium. I only use smaller and thinner pots/pans and I cook EVERYTHING. The smaller the surface, the faster the conduction (conductivity?).
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Old 08-11-2011
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Look at the Dickinson Beaufort 32,000 btu, but 350lbs and $7,000.

DickinsonMarine.com - Marine Stoves

You must be planning on a really big boat.
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Old 08-11-2011
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I still miss the 6-burner commercial cooktop I had at home. Total heat output drove me to an active fire-suppression system in order to clear my building permit.

If you find something that can really put out heat for a boat I'd like to hear about it. Getting the heat back out of the boat when you really start to rock on the cooktop can be a challenge. Even with my little Eno I have hatches open and fans blowing all over.

Please report back if you find something great.
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Old 08-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulladh View Post
Look at the Dickinson Beaufort 32,000 btu, but 350lbs and $7,000.

DickinsonMarine.com - Marine Stoves

You must be planning on a really big boat.
Thanks, good link info, but it uses diesel. It also the stove does not have an open flame burner. I would buy it if it has one burner that can gives out 16250 BTU and the cost is reasonable for Yachting use ($2201)

Dave,

I most likely will do the mod myself when I get my boat. There are countless of sizes of cast iron burner heads to choose from in the Kitchen supply stores in Chinatown, NYC. I can fab a relatively compact one to use in the boat. It will have piano folding hinges on SS plate on three sides that can be open up as heat shield. When not use, it can be folded and put away. For the gas supply line, I am thinking to have a quick disconnect.

It will be handy to cook up some good meals. With burners just have enough BTU to reheat food gets bored easily. Eating out get tired also, especially when they are marginally edible. How many times can we eat crab cake before our body rejects it.

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Old 08-11-2011
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You seem to have problems with your stove that I don't. What stove are you currently using?
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If you are going to fabricate a single high temp burner, look at using a plumbers lead crucible burner. Fast hot propane burner, but maybe not safe for interior use, and may melt aluminum pots.
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Old 08-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
I hate to compromise when comes to food and eating good. The burners that installed in the most sailboats are just so anemic. It is not really able to cut it. I think most of them are less than 7000 BTU or may be even less. I got spoiled by the 22,000 BTU Garland stove with a 2700 cpm exhaust system. I want more BTU's and better exhaust system.

Anyone out there upgraded their galley for a better living condition?
I too hate my boat stove. It's a tasco and I think the burners are less than 5,000 btu, no more anyway. Force 10 has one larger burner, that's a great idea but I've never used one.

I can't believe how much it limits how you can cook which means how well you can cook. Don't even ask about the oven.

We have a restaurant stove at home with 20,000 btu burners, maybe more. With real heat you can cook quickly, there's little sticking, fantastic way to eat.

If I lived aboard, I'd throw it over the rail.
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Old 08-11-2011
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Good chefs or even cooks never blame their tools or lack of them on what they produce. . Get creative with your cooking techniques, your ingredients, the size of the ingredients you are cooking.

I am sure Shaun (T37chef) has stories like I about cooking huge upscale banquets over stero in a tent for some VIPs.

I have never had a problem making or creating any meal on my boat that I could make at home. Certainly the amount of heat of the burners was not the limiting factor. Just saying

We would all like to strap Viking stoves to our backs...have the finest Hattori or Misono knives with us with all of our tasks...but thats not always possible. Like the Maines do observe , adapt and overcome

Dave
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