Would you seatrial a 4k$ 86 Hunter 23? - SailNet Community

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Old 09-05-2011
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Would you seatrial a 4k$ 86 Hunter 23?

I am going to look at a 86 Hunter 23 today. I have read and re-read the inspection threads, and have a comfortable feel for inspecting. My first thought was not to take the boat on a seatrial (it is on land now). I am comfortable doing most any repair, although I am not looking for a project. I'll post inspection pics later today.

Keith
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Old 09-05-2011
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I would never buy any boat without a sea trial. While you might be up to any repairs, you could end up with a boat that you absolutely hate the way it feels under sail. Also, disposing of a boat that is unsailable is not something that can be accomplished by parking it at the curb for the garbage truck to deal with.
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Old 09-05-2011
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I agree with Mimsy. Although I am not sure it would be a complete deal breaker if for some reason I didn't take it on a sea trial. Now if the owner absolutely refuses to let you that would be a huge red flag against it.

At a minimum I would want to float test it to make sure that nothing leaked.
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Old 09-05-2011
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I'd also recommend conducting a sea trial before purchase.

First, there are a lot of things that you simply can't accurately assess unless you put them under load (engine, rigging, hull, etc.) It would seriously suck to spend all that time & money fixing up the boat on the hard only to find out that these non-tested items need additional attention.

Second, the sea trial clause gives you an out in your contract. If you get it out on the water and for whatever reason you begin to have nagging doubts (as opposed to demonstrable shortcomings from the survey) you can still walk away from the sale.
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Old 09-05-2011
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sea trial

4k trailer sailer I would not need to sea trial. You know what you are getting and there are plenty of reviews on how she sails. If it were me I'd hitch it up and take her home.
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Old 09-05-2011
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OK people here sits My now sold J24 in pretty perfect condition ready to be checked by a surveyor for any defect

WOULD you really pay the 1000 dollars involved in having the crane launch the boat and step the mast and then take the mast back down and put it back on the trailer to go on a day sail on a common boat

NOBODY who looked at the boat had any intention of doing it and i have said it BEFORE and i will say it again a sea trial is NOT to see if you like how a boat sails its to see if the boat has a DEFECT
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Old 09-05-2011
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Ok, $4k is a trailer sailor. Here is what you look at... Rigging, look for bends, kinks, frays. Chainplates... Look for rust, and look closely at bolts. Look at Keel bolts. Check the hull for integrity. Look for cracks around any through-hulls, including the scuppers.

Check mast step, for cracks, and leaks at bolts. Also have owner roll out the sails for you on clean (hopefully dry) ground.

Check scrapes/scratches in the hull, especially if below the waterline. This would indicate poor seamanship by a previous owner, or at least, poor treatment was received by the boat.

You can assess the condition of the boat fairly quickly with these things. NO it isn't 100%. However, care in one area, generally gives rise to care in most areas.

Now you are looking at a trailer sailor, so the TRAILER needs inspection before you move the boat. Tires TIRES TIRES... Don't move dry rot. Wear on outter edges is a pain, but not the end of the world. However if edges are worn, you may need to jack up the trailer, and spin a wheel or two. Test the bearings. If there are bearing buddies, grease them! Now lights... Look up to the trailer, or have the owner hook up. Have them test the lights. RARELY do people EVER have the lights right for you. Bonus if they do, because they probably actually took the time and cared enough. If the trailer has brakes (in our state it is supposed to over 3000lbs net). Pop a wheel off and check them. Also check the surge mechanism is free and clear.

I JUST bought my boat on the hard, on a trailer. It was a Capri 22, a 1989. Good deals can be had, as mine was. I considered the Hunter 23 as well (seems like a great boat).

For the record... I pulled away, with no brakes, and no lights. The lights turned out to be a quirk with my truck... and I own a RAM 2500... I regularly tow 5000+ lbs (horse trailer) and have brandy new brakes on my truck. The trailer brakes don't work as it has a busted brake line... However the boat was VERY well equipped.

Good luck, and please post pictures of your new ride if you get it!
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Old 09-05-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommays View Post




OK people here sits My now sold J24 in pretty perfect condition ready to be checked by a surveyor for any defect

WOULD you really pay the 1000 dollars involved in having the crane launch the boat and step the mast and then take the mast back down and put it back on the trailer to go on a day sail on a common boat

NOBODY who looked at the boat had any intention of doing it and i have said it BEFORE and i will say it again a sea trial is NOT to see if you like how a boat sails its to see if the boat has a DEFECT
I wouldn't look at a boat that couldn't be launched for a sea trial, but that is just me. We almost bought a boat that we liked everything about, until we got underway. I would have hated to have spent the cash on that boat because I would have never felt comfortable on it.

Granted, it was a bit more than 4k but I wouldn't look at a trailerable boat that required $1,000 to look at it. I would pay for a quick haul but I'd want to see the boat in the water first. Some would and more power to them but the OP asked what we as individuals would do and in the end, he will make up his own mind. Your comfort level with buying a boat without a seatrial differs from mine. The OP is just trying to figure out where his comfort level is.
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Old 09-05-2011
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So there you have it -- a definitive SailNet answer of "it depends"

Tom's made some good points arguing against a sea trial.

It will all boil down to what your definition of acceptable risk may be. My guess is that you'll have a better feel for that definition once you actually look at the boat. If it's obviously as well kept and prepared as Tom's J24, I think you could safely elect to forego the sea trial. If it's a rat's nest of crap below, you'll probably walk away anyway. Chances are good that it'll be somewhere in between, and you'll need to make a judgement call of whether or not to spend the time/money/aggravation involved in a launch & recovery to allay any concerns you may have.

Last edited by PorFin; 09-05-2011 at 02:01 PM.
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Old 09-05-2011
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I would take it on a sea trial if it wasn't going to cost me anything, but not if I had to spend $1000. A sea trial allows you to determine what works and what doesn't. When you're at the sea trial stage you basically have bought the boat. If for example the outboard is said to be in good working order then it would have to work to pass a sea trial. Otherwise it's "as is" and if it doesn't work then you have to pay for the reapair instead of the PO.
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