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  #11  
Old 09-14-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtod25 View Post
AFAIK the water tank (i.e. the part that will eventually leak) on all Seaward water heaters is made of Alcoa Alclad aluminum alloy.
Yup!

Per Alclad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Alclad is a trademark of Alcoa used as a generic term to describe corrosion resistant aluminium sheet formed from high-purity aluminium surface layers metallurgically bonded to high strength aluminium alloy core material. These sheets are commonly used by the aircraft industry[1]. The first aircraft to be constructed from Alclad was the all-metal Navy zeppelin ZMC-2, constructed in 1927 at Naval Air Station Grosse Ile.[2]

Described in NACA-TN-259[3], of August 1927, as "a new corrosion resistant aluminum product which is markedly superior to the present strong alloys. Its use should result in greatly increased life of a structural part. Alclad is a heat-treated aluminum, copper, manganese, magnesium alloy that has the corrosion resistance of pure metal at the surface and the strength of the strong alloy underneath. Of particular importance is the thorough character of the union between the alloy and the pure aluminum. Preliminary results of salt spray tests (24 weeks of exposure) show changes in tensile strength and elongation of Alclad 17ST, when any occurred, to be so small as to be well within the limits of experimental error." In applications involving aircraft construction Alclad has proven to have increased resistance to corrosion at the expense of increased weight when compared to sheet aluminum.[4]
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  #12  
Old 09-14-2011
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Thank you for the pic!

Just looking at what you posted, it looks like the heater failed at the weld. Is there ANY possibility that the unit was over pressurized, or damaged from an over temperature incident?
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Old 09-14-2011
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Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
Thank you for the pic!

Just looking at what you posted, it looks like the heater failed at the weld. Is there ANY possibility that the unit was over pressurized, or damaged from an over temperature incident?
It looks like it froze or was over pressure but that is hard on a boat.. Isotemp for me..
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  #14  
Old 09-14-2011
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Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
It looks like it froze or was over pressure but that is hard on a boat.. Isotemp for me..
Good point! My first thought is that it is possible that if the engine were to overheat that the over temp water (+240F) could over heat the water in the water in the heater. I forgot that water expands when it gets cold too!

Would Isotemp fare any better?
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Last edited by eherlihy; 09-14-2011 at 08:34 PM.
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Old 09-14-2011
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Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
Good point! My first thought is that it is possible that if the engine were to overheat that the over temp water (+240F) could over heat the water in the water in the heater. I forgot that water expands when it gets cold too!

Would Isotemp fare any better?
No... I have seen 10" black iron pipe that is 1/2" thick split like a ballerina from freezing water heaters don't stand a chance.....
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Seaward water heater...

Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
Thank you for the pic!

Just looking at what you posted, it looks like the heater failed at the weld. Is there ANY possibility that the unit was over pressurized, or damaged from an over temperature incident?
None of the above as far as I know and freezing not a major problem in South Florida.
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