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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #21  
Old 10-22-2011
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sawingknots is on a distinguished road
i was in the boy scouts for two or three days,i didn't learn any knots and i still have some trouble tying my shoes but i did learn that theres a lot to be said about choosing shipmates
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  #22  
Old 10-23-2011
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Curtisfromcarlsbad is on a distinguished road
I was a quartermaster on a submarine during the cold war. I learned to navigate and spent at least a year as a helmsman/sternplanesman. I am an extremely patient person,able to sit in traffic for hours unphased just enjoying the moment,adapting to the circumstance and picking songs off my MP3 player. Countless months at sea (about 2/3 of my 4 years) is how I built up this patience. It helps me a lot. I own some taxis and also drive 90 hours a week and love it. Also the hardship of only sleeping 4-5 hours a night for all those sea months and the incredibly long work hours(washed dishes for 19 hours a day 7 days a week) for a cumulative of 1 year. We washed dishes until the skin was rotting off both forearms(scullery rot) then drove for 2 weeks to heal. I don't piss and moan as much about life's small hardships as some of my softer acquaintances do and I attribute some of this to the US Navy ! I also became breadwinner at age 13 in Mexico and had to fish out at sea for 5 days a week for 4 years. I didn't go to school after age 10 because of this poverty. I did go to college and got a 2 year degree after the Navy though. Screw it- the economy is in the shits now-join the Navy don't even think twice. It is the source of my most pride !
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  #23  
Old 10-23-2011
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kr3728 is on a distinguished road
Infantryman

I'm a career infantry officer with all the associated boy scout badges (Airborne, Ranger, etc.), and this is what being an infantryman taught me that has helped me with sailing. (All are observational, but related to experiences and training and education I've recieved as a soldier.)

* It can always be colder, and it can always be wetter. What you have now is good. So there is no reason to whine.

* Yes, you *can* eat that.

* Knots matter.

* Sunrise is not to be missed. (On average I see the sun rise about 350 days out of the year.)

* Sleep is over-rated. If you are an 18 year old male, you can get by with six hours, in one or two hour pops per 24 hours. If you are a 30 year old male, you can get by with five and willpower, for extended periods of time. If you are a 40 year old male, you can get by with four, but will need naps. Sleep when you're dead.

* Put your trust in people, not hardware. When a person proves untrustworthy, even once, give them a second chance after about a decade. When a piece of hardware proves untrustworthy, get rid of it.

Hope this helps.

Bob Bateman
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  #24  
Old 10-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kr3728 View Post
I'm a career infantry officer with all the associated boy scout badges (Airborne, Ranger, etc.), and this is what being an infantryman taught me that has helped me with sailing. (All are observational, but related to experiences and training and education I've recieved as a soldier.)

* It can always be colder, and it can always be wetter. What you have now is good. So there is no reason to whine.

* Yes, you *can* eat that.

* Knots matter.

* Sunrise is not to be missed. (On average I see the sun rise about 350 days out of the year.)

* Sleep is over-rated. If you are an 18 year old male, you can get by with six hours, in one or two hour pops per 24 hours. If you are a 30 year old male, you can get by with five and willpower, for extended periods of time. If you are a 40 year old male, you can get by with four, but will need naps. Sleep when you're dead.

* Put your trust in people, not hardware. When a person proves untrustworthy, even once, give them a second chance after about a decade. When a piece of hardware proves untrustworthy, get rid of it.

Hope this helps.

Bob Bateman
that helps thanks
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  #25  
Old 11-08-2011
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1833usmc is on a distinguished road
Listen up!!! When you go to the recruiter tell them you want a
guaranteed M.O.S. ! DO NOT go in under a General Enlistment. Get into a field that has market demand in the civilian world for when you get out. Go find the old salts. Talk to them. Ask questions. Listen and go do it!
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  #26  
Old 11-08-2011
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Other than perhaps a BM which is totally about seamanship, I was a Radar Plotter 271 RCN, Navigation, Rel. Vel in my head, radar Operation, Meterology, Radio, writing upside down and backwards along with the real handy stuff, a BA in Runs ashore and Arrest Avoidance have all come in real Handy.
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Last edited by kootenay; 11-08-2011 at 10:19 PM.
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  #27  
Old 11-08-2011
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Originally Posted by kootenay View Post
Other than perhaps a BM which is totally about seamanship, I was a Radar Plotter 271 RCN, Navigation, Rel. Vel in my head, radar Operation, Meterology, Radio, writing upside down and backwards along with the real handy stuff, a BA in Runs ashore and Arrest Avoidance have all come in real Handy.
Well back in the 80's a BM spent 90% of the time cleaning, chipping and painting the boat. Than when they finished at one end they went to the other and started all over. If they weren't doing that they stood 4 on 4 off watches at the helm, no autopilot, had to hold the coarse to + or - 1 deg or get written up.


Those poor ppl never went on liberty. When the ship pulled into port they had to work for many hrs after words securing the ship, while us ET's (electronic techs) like us hit the local bars.

Once a BM made it up the ranks which took forever they did have some freedom but not much. There's a reason why most ppl who failed at one school or another were sent out to the fleet as a BM.

So lesson here is join the navy but have a job on your contract and do not fail your A school. As long as you apply yourself you will not fail.
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  #28  
Old 11-08-2011
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I guess we had a different system in that each department had to provide their quota of bodies to the deck party. It was young RP's, Sonar and WEapons who did the chipping and scratching on board while the ABBM's directed the party. It was Sonar and Weapons that got stuck forever out on deck while Ops had tech jobs that meant other than the two junior guys in the department everyone worked in their trade. I spent my first 6 months on board as a odd job boy for the CBM. Learned alot too because my first lesson from a old Chief was how much easier it was when you cared about what you were doing. The best job onboard our ships was a "hull Tech" by the time a EM had finished his trade quals and his "3's" (5-6 years on board) course he had achieved about 7 journeymens tickets. In 1979 when I got out it meant an after Navy wage of 60-70k per year. Today in the Oilpatch the same guy would be worth 150-200k per year.
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  #29  
Old 11-08-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kootenay View Post
I guess we had a different system in that each department had to provide their quota of bodies to the deck party. It was young RP's, Sonar and WEapons who did the chipping and scratching on board while the ABBM's directed the party. It was Sonar and Weapons that got stuck forever out on deck while Ops had tech jobs that meant other than the two junior guys in the department everyone worked in their trade. I spent my first 6 months on board as a odd job boy for the CBM. Learned alot too because my first lesson from a old Chief was how much easier it was when you cared about what you were doing. The best job onboard our ships was a "hull Tech" by the time a EM had finished his trade quals and his "3's" (5-6 years on board) course he had achieved about 7 journeymens tickets. In 1979 when I got out it meant an after Navy wage of 60-70k per year. Today in the Oilpatch the same guy would be worth 150-200k per year.
Some good points. Our XO was a ex ET I think (or started out in OPS) so our dept got the best of the best. We were first off the ship and last to have to return. When it came to deck crews we did supply guys but we always got the best positions we could. You are right though once we were at sea everyone E-4 and below had to paint unless you were on watch or had equipment down. So 90% of the time us ET's had stuff that "needed fixed" lol. yes I know we skated most of the time...
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  #30  
Old 11-08-2011
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Quote:
When you go to the recruiter tell them you want a
guaranteed M.O.S. ! DO NOT go in under a General Enlistment. Get into a field that has market demand in the civilian world for when you get out.
This is the best advice for enlistment, period. Once you secure an MOS it is on you. Fail, and you're a cook or some other impossible to recruit for job. Pass and life can be a walk in the park with the same benefits as all the hard working folks.
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