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Old 10-19-2011
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Any Navy or other military occupations that have helped you prepare for living aboard

Hello everyone

I am wondering if there are any vets or current people in the Navy (or military or for that matter ANY job out there) who feel like it has made them a better sailor, and I am actually asking for advice on which job in the Navy would be good to seek if I joined that would prepare me the most for living aboard. I am not dead set on joining the Navy, but I am 26 now with almost 0 debt (about to pay off my last 1000$ of credit card debt). I've begun selling my items too lol. I think joining the Navy I could learn valuable things that would help me on a boat and perhaps save some money for when I get out in 4 years (assuming I do that). Also, what are some hobbies or general knowledge that have come in handy that you were glad you had? Is it easy as an American (I'm from Forida) to go to somewhere like Mexico, live on their boat and find a part time or dinky job to make ends meet (great thing about not having debt

TL;DR
I want to know who has a job that really helped them with living aboard ... like fixing things or safety or xyz.

edit:
my job requires quick hand eye coordination and being able to do a thing over and over and over again. I enjoy playing piano, which helps keep me sharp. Also, I am a very safe automobile driver due to my car is very slow (diesel and old and about to die), so I think I would make a good sailor in this aspect. However, I am not too handy at fixing electrical, plumbing, or other general handyman issues, but that could change quickly on a sailboat if I HAD to fix something.

I live on the water so seeing nice weather is absolute TORTURE. I am going to have to be a budget sailor with very little expenses. What is a reasonable budget to get myself a boat that I can live on? I am 26, no kids, no pets (I will let a lizard live on my boat or find a seagull or pelican if I need one lol), male, like to drink occasionally, read, just enjoy the experience. I don't need all sorts of gadgets and gismos but maybe during my journey I will pick some up is what I'm thinking. I don't need a marina as I can find a bayou or something. I will need lots of water, some food, a bicycle, small cash flow, good weather. I am talking pretty barebones at first. Light and relaxed. Maybe open a trade route lol I am getting ahead of myself. I get really excited when I think about this.


THANKS!
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I'm a Coast Guard vet. I learned seamanship and boat handling as a Boatswain's Mate.
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Cabinetmaker. I'm a computer guy by trade, but my hobby is cabinet making, and the skills and tools it brought to me have been VERY useful in maintaining the boat. I would think a pro would bring even more.
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Old 10-19-2011
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Royal Canadian Artillery helped me with learning self discipline and introduced me to maps and cartography. Charts are still a passion; I collect antique charts of some of the areas I have been on the water.
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Motorsport, Military Experience

I've found my background in the motorsport industry to have been great preparation for maintaining, improving and fixing any yacht problems from composite, electronics, mechanical, structural, ergonomic and corrosion.

With qualifications as a mechanic and air frame welder and professional engineering qualifications including a Masters in Materials Welding and Joining I'm not daunted by any problem

A stint in the Australian Army gave me the confidence and practical problem solving skills in difficult situations that sailing seems to demand.

So my advice is to join the military and get an engineering skill. You wont regret it.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I'm a Coast Guard vet. I learned seamanship and boat handling as a Boatswain's Mate.
i just read a wikipedia article on boatswains mate...sounds quite useful for learning to tie knots.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leftbrainstuff View Post
I've found my background in the motorsport industry to have been great preparation for maintaining, improving and fixing any yacht problems from composite, electronics, mechanical, structural, ergonomic and corrosion.
It was my experience in motorsport that got me into sailing. I went to grad school in Houston. Before I went I was a co-driver in a rally car. We used to joke that three qualities were needed: a belief that your driver was god, the ability to do cube roots in your head, and a complete inability to throw up.

One of one classmates approached me one day to confirm that I was OK with taking risks and that I did not get motion sick easily. After I responded in the affirmative she asked if I wanted to join the crew of a racing yacht; she said they would teach me all I needed to know.

The rest is history.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcherBowman View Post
Cabinetmaker. I'm a computer guy by trade, but my hobby is cabinet making, and the skills and tools it brought to me have been VERY useful in maintaining the boat. I would think a pro would bring even more.

I used to think I would get into computers until I bought a 1000 page TCP/IP book...Maybe if I buy a boat and boredom sets in I will pick it back up lol. I do have a little woodworking (mainly helping my grandfather make beds). He used to pay me like 50$ a weekend to help him sand. Man oh man do I have some hours just sanding.
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I was in the US Navy back in the 80's. Much has changed but also much has stayed the same. Our son will be applying for the US Naval Academy in 2013 so we are still up to date on today's Navy.

If you are going in as a enlisted man make certain that you have a job listed on your enlistment contract. If not you'll end up just cleaning and painting as a full time job. That is the lowest job on a navy ship. Everyone else will be on liberty while you work.

I was a ET (electronics tech) they will teach you how to work on electronics to the component level.

Just a few jobs in the Navy that might help, keep in mind the Navy doesn't really sail.

Signalman.

Aerographer’s Mates are the Navy's meteorological and oceanographic experts

Engine man.

Rescue swimmer.

Diver.

These are just a few jobs you can learn to do. There are many many more. It's best to just see a recruiter they can give you a simple test and ask you some questions that will steer you in the right direction. Again just keep in mind do not sign anything until you see what they tell you in writing. Many times people tend to hear what they want to hear. What a recruiter says really doesn't matter it's what's on your contract that does. You will not actually sign the contract until you are at a MEPS (military enlistment processing station) chances are your recruiter will not be there. At MEPS they give you a physical and stuff like that. At the end of the processing you will sign the contract and swear in.

In our family we have had 12 members join over the years and today a few are still in. Those who have gotten out have had great careers. Like I said before our son who is still in HS is preparing for the USNA.

You only get one chance while you are young to serve your country. Later in life you'll look back and be proud you did.

Thanks and good luck to you.

Last edited by neverknow; 10-19-2011 at 11:19 PM.
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Old 10-20-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I'm a Coast Guard vet. I learned seamanship and boat handling as a Boatswain's Mate.
Excellent. If ams5995's objective is to learn skills that will serve him well aboard a boat, the Coast Guard is the service of choice. In general, however, most of the military offers a lot of training that is beneficial in terms of self reliance and self discipline that is necessary aboard.
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