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  #11  
Old 11-03-2011
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The thing about an expereinced inspector is that he has seen 1000x more rigs than...

... you ever will. He does it every day. He's seen hundreds of rigging failures, not all of which led to dismastings, of course.

After some 15 years in the oil industry I was asked to start doing petroleum tank inspections. Instead of just seeing my facility, I have now seen thousands of tanks across the country and failures I wouldn't have thought of (for example, a brass float sank, sat on bottom, and electrolysis drilled through 1/4-inch of steel in 5 years: brass floats are a no-no).

Inspectors aren't claiming to be smarter; they've just seen more than you have time to and good ones have learned what to look for and how to look for it.
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Old 11-03-2011
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Yachting Monthly did a video trying to dismast their "crash test boat" a few months ago. The one thing I was a little surprised about was how difficult it was to actually cause the rig to go over, even in 30 kt winds. Certainly not an empirical result, but it certainly made me feel a little better.
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Old 11-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
What I am asking in this post is have you ever had a standing rigging failure and if so, how did you repair at sea.

Even the best sailors with new boats (Around Alone sailors among others) have had rigging failures and have had to deal with them at sea- that is what I was asking about.
I've been on a boat that's lost a rig (crossed rigs in a starting sequence), but not off shore. What I do know is that you'll need something to cut rod and or wire. It's required safety equipment for racing, so it's on the boat all the time. Beyond that, it's using one's other skills (knots, understanding of load vectors and paths, skills with a knife, etc.. and having appropriate spare line to 'make due'. Honestly, I'm much more concerned with damaging/losing a rudder than losing the rig. Yes, we have an emergency rudder for offshore that functions pretty well! Do I think we'd manage? Yes, I'd like to think so. Nothing is 100%, and no one really knows until they're in that situation, but that's a risk I'm happy to live with. TV's boring.

Last edited by puddinlegs; 11-03-2011 at 04:09 PM.
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Old 11-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
... you ever will. He does it every day. He's seen hundreds of rigging failures, not all of which led to dismastings, of course.

Inspectors aren't claiming to be smarter; they've just seen more than you have time to and good ones have learned what to look for and how to look for it.
Exactly!
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Old 11-03-2011
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I've had one rigging failure - it was the double jaw toggle on on forestay that broke in half. I was about 120 miles south of Bermuda and then used my spinnaker halyard to stabilize the mast. Needless to say I couldn't use the Genoa and motor sailed to Bermuda.

Interesting thing- I totally re-rigged my boat, replaced all wire, turnbuckles, fittings etc. - I thought everything had been replaced - except that! Had spare and repaired it in harbor.
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Old 11-03-2011
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I took the turnbuckles off a new Force 50 for the owner who was doing his due diligence.Brand new and polished SS. The first one broke over my knee like a carrot.I guess you get what you pay for and assumptions can be very expensive .
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Old 11-03-2011
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We had our aft chain plate pull up about 1/4" while out sailing in wind up to 20 knots. There was an audible 'twang' in the rig when it happened and my friend's wife was sitting right next to the aft stay and felt the jolt.
I immediately ordered the genoa to be furled up to reduce stress on our keel stepped mast and rig. We motor sailed home; about a mile away. The chain plates on our boat were encased in epoxy knee walls and after 40 years to wood core was rotted and the SS bolts rusted.
No dis-masting but definitely a rig failure.
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Old 11-03-2011
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I had the clevis pin come out of the cap shroud turnbuckle. It was in light air, caught the problem and had it fixed.

No dismastings.
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Old 11-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommays View Post
I buy my rigging for a name brand place that has something to lose if they sell me defective stuff and if it fails the mast is gonna fall down
What excatly do they stand to lose that any other store/seller does?
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Old 11-03-2011
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I had the rig fail on a shock 35 I was crewing on several years ago off of Block Island. Not a fun experiance. We were on a weather leg in about 45 kts of breeze.
The mast sheered off half way up to the first spreader. It was pretty stressful for a bit. We had a bolt cutter w/ us and I started in on the rod rigging. The main was completely torn out at the failure point. Once the standing rigging was cut and halyards cut free we were able to drag the mast and rats nest of sail and rigging onto the deck.
I was concerned the rig was going to hole the boat and wanted to just cut everything free but the owner wanted to salvage everything that we could.
Rolling around broadside in 45 kts w/ a rig in the water isn't fun.
Once we had everything tied down we motored in w/ most of the crew now seasick.
If there hadn't been 10 people on board there is no way we would have been able to salvage the rig. I wouldn't want to go thru that w/ just my wife and myself. The only thing I would be able to do is cut the rig away.
Jim
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Last edited by jimrafford; 11-03-2011 at 06:37 PM.
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