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  #91  
Old 01-24-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

Oh, and just to make this perfectly clear, you can not depend upon any "faith in humanity" to rescue you. Which is why I really hope anyone reading this realizes the importance of this thread: You should direct your own rescue as much as possible.
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  #92  
Old 01-25-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

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Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post
Which again supports the concept of this thread, that WE have to direct our rescue. The rescuers do not want to expose themselves to danger.
Doug, as you obviously know by now, as evidenced by the article I wrote and my offline conversations with you, I don't agree with your analysis. And I only say that now in this thread because your analysis does not support the concept of this thread...not completely.

Yes, you should direct your rescue as much as possible in the planning stages when you are still part of the communication triangle (you, the CG, and the ship's captain). You should discuss the approach, the transfer methods, the details of your vessel, the liabilities of your crew and how that may affect transfer, etc. - and have enough knowledge of those transfer methods to actively plan with that captain.

BUT - when that ship arrives and the captain of that ship begins his work to rescue you, you are no longer in charge of the rescue...for many very good reasons.
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Last edited by smackdaddy; 01-25-2014 at 12:44 AM.
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  #93  
Old 01-25-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

BUT - when that ship arrives and the captain of that ship begins his work to rescue you, you are no longer in charge of the rescue...for many very good reasons.[/QUOTE]

Daddy -

As much as I respect and appreciate your depth of efforts towards the improvement of this situation, I would still - if ever in that situation again - follow the steps I outlined above.

The Captain of the Kim Jacob thought he had a plan until he realized we were a sailboat and he wouldn't be able to winch our boat to his deck, which had been his plan. Then he was in a reactive rather than a proactive mode.
Another words he had no idea what to do.

He would have greatly appreciated it if I had provided a plan. And, we ALL would have appreciated it too.

This thread provides a stage for that to be discussed.

You are correct that the rescue ship is in charge, but I am also correct that they might well not know what to do. And our experience supports the concept that having a plan ahead of time, then sharing that with the rescue ship is a lot better than not.

Because as has been bantered around to everyone's "disgust" is the fact that they are not obligated to place themselves into harm's way.

So, that being the case, it sure is a lot healthier to have a plan to avoid depending upon them to go above and beyond that. Something which works for them and for you... as my plan does.

Yes they are "in charge" but when it is your life on the line, you have to have a plan - and be ready to conduct it with their help.

I fully agree: communication is a requirement, but you have to have something to communicate. My list is a real good outline to start with.
It is based upon a real life experience.

Fair winds.....
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  #94  
Old 01-27-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

I have conducted a few presentations of our medical evacuation. I have posted a pdf of the PowerPoint presentation.



The video of the evacuation as seen from Navarino:



This was not a Mayday, and we were not abandoning ship.
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  #95  
Old 01-27-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

Well, given a fully functional vessel, less than 1 foot seas, less than 5 knot winds, and a stationary / stopped "rescue" vessel, as this medical evacuation video presents, a transfer of people CAN occur very smoothly.

Rarely would those be the conditions in a mayday / abandon vessel event.
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

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Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post
Well, given a fully functional vessel, less than 1 foot seas, less than 5 knot winds, and a stationary / stopped "rescue" vessel, as this medical evacuation video presents, a transfer of people CAN occur very smoothly.

Rarely would those be the conditions in a mayday / abandon vessel event.
Absolutely - check out the second lesson learned.

But you were still on my mind during the process.

Navarino was doing 2 knots to maintain steerage - suction was an issue.
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  #97  
Old 01-27-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post
they are not obligated to place themselves into harm's way.
When I went back and read the thread detailing Doug Sabbag's very interesting story, I was absolutely floored when he mentioned almost in passing that the Captain of the Kim Jacob actually went in the water himself to try and save Doug Sabbag. Talk about placing yourself in harm's way for some completely ungrateful .

How he can have the gall to publicly chastise the Captain for this rescue is way beyond any sense of reason. And, still, years later, on it goes....

Last edited by Cruisingdad; 01-31-2014 at 10:55 AM. Reason: Name calling
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  #98  
Old 01-29-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

You want to see what a GENUINELY INSANE rescue by ship looks like? Here (from the POV of the ship's captain):

Queens Birthday Storm 1994 - HMNZS MONOWAI



Imagine, as the rescuee, enduring this...
Quote:
It was therefore with some relief that we saw Bill and Robyn fall into the water just off their starboard bow. And we watched as this couple was pulled through the foaming seas for a distance of about 150 or 200 meters to MONOWAI. They spent quite a lot of the time actually under the water, especially Robyn and I remember remarking to someone at the time that she was obviously under water a lot of the time but we would 'just have to pump her out' when we got her on board.
Then saying this...
Quote:
I was told later that Bills first words on being brought over the deck were "Bloody hell you guys are great".
That's true commitment and gratitude ladies and gentlemen.

Well done Larry Robbins. Indeed.
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  #99  
Old 01-30-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

i don't know how you guys feel about it, but - even in calm conditions - coming close to a big vessel scares the sh** out of me...
i do not want to know how it must feel and how nightmarish this must be in towering, braking waves, horizontal rain and howling winds...
i think i would rather throw myself in a revolving liferaft than coming close, yet being 'towed' to a steel wall the size of a 3 stories building which is rolling by 35-40°, threatening to smack you really hard...
honestly - the more i think about it, the more an inflatable rubber thingy like a liferaft looks like a featherbed, a soft cushion which is not going to hurt me apart from throwing me around a bit...

Last edited by capt vimes; 01-30-2014 at 06:29 AM.
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Old 01-30-2014
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Re: Rescued at Sea - Are You Prepared?

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.....the more i think about it, the more an inflatable rubber thingy like a liferaft looks like a featherbed, a soft cushion which is not going to hurt me apart from throwing me around a bit...
There is something to be said for that. However, if I was stepping off a floating vessel into the raft, for the purpose of transferring to a ship, I would want the raft tethered to that ship first. The other matter to be considered is rupturing the raft, among all the hard stuff around you. Hence, a fairly certain connection and recovery.

The ultimate moral to the story is that an AMVER rescue is a voluntary last ditch effort, one half step above just letting you die out there. I would be massively grateful for that half step and hope I never require it.
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