boat living question for someone green - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 27 Old 11-21-2011
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Of course it depends to some extent on which 29'er but for mine, living on board 29' and working, particularly in an office would not be practical but to each his own. One thing for very certain, if I was working and living on board I would have to be in a pen, particularly in a 30 odd footer. I'd have thought and I know its a fact for me at least that trying to shower and dress for work and then row to shore would get very old very quickly.

Living on board in non working cruising mode would be a very different kettle of fish and then I'd prefer to be anchored or moored. I think its the getting ready for work thing that I'd have trouble with.

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post #12 of 27 Old 11-21-2011 Thread Starter
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There's a lot you can learn on your own, but I totally agree with Donna to take classes with either CG Aux or Power Squadron. Learning in a classroom is way better than self study. I've taken numerous classes over the years and all have been well worth the time and effort.
how much do these classes usually go for, what are they called, and when and where can i take them?

also, which order should a newbie take the classes in?
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post #13 of 27 Old 11-21-2011
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how much do these classes usually go for, what are they called, and when and where can i take them?

also, which order should a newbie take the classes in?
With the CG Auxiliary, start with either Sailing Skills and Seamanship or Boating Skills and Seamanship. They are basically the same but the SSS course has a sailing slant.

With the US Power and Sail Squadron you might begin with America's Boating Course.

You'll see plenty online courses but I recommend taking a course in a classroom with an instructor. The advantage is that you can ask questions and benefit from the experience of more experienced boaters. Each squadron and flotilla sets its own prices for the class. You'll have to poke around the websites to locate the one nearest you. We don't know where you live.

Instructors at either can guide you as to the next courses but I would suggest a more in depth navigation course given your goals.

American Sailing Association has on-water classes. When I took it there was less about your responsibility as a boater and more sail handling. I took a weekend course for ASA 101 and the book was mailed to me a few months before the class. Again you'll have to look on the website for a course near you.

Donna


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Last edited by DRFerron; 11-21-2011 at 08:10 PM.
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post #14 of 27 Old 11-21-2011
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Save your money and get a library card. sailing isn't brain surgery. people have been sailing about for centuries. Just read,read,read, and start hanging out around other sailors for comedic relief.
Aparently you already have internet. there are alot of free online instruction and reading material.
boat us has free online intro courses ,rules of the road,safety at sea,etc.
the basic classes in the classroom enviroment are usually not populated w/ old salts.
As for living on the hook.
It can be done you just need to think it through and be resourceful.
for example; If you need a shower every morning then you need to bring water out w/ you in the evening when you return to your craft in you dinghy. if you don't have a shower aboard and pressurized water then you need a solar shower bag (like hikers/campers use.
these are just a couple examples.
all the other issues-refrigeration,power,fresh water, can all be addressed by a little planning and a decision of how complex systems you have/want/or can afford.
just take your time and think it through.
your either cut out for it or your not.
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post #15 of 27 Old 11-21-2011
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Take the classes. Cost is truly minimal and you can't interact with a library card like you can with your instructor and other members of your class.
A good part of what you learn in class comes as much from questions, answers and experiences of all in the class as it does the textbook and course materials.
I'm 58 and have been boating all my life. I've taken 5 classes, the first about 15 years ago and all were well worth it.
I've also taken online classes (not in boating) and they don't begin to come close to an actual class.
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post #16 of 27 Old 11-21-2011 Thread Starter
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thanks for all the input guys. its good to see many options available.
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post #17 of 27 Old 11-22-2011
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I think you're going to take one of these classes and wind up being bored to death and give up on sailing all togetherI think these classes have value and have a place among the boating set, but to study your way into sailing is sort of like buying a car based on researching the consumer reports. I'm not saying don't take them, and there is no doubt they will make you a better and safer sailor, but if you're not even convinced you want to really get into sailing, why spend the money? But I digress. Since your question wasn't about how best to learn to sail, and more geared to the logisitics of living aboard I'll focus on that.

I think the most important thing you can do is go hang out at some marinas. Find out when they do their beercan races, and get on with a couple of them. You'd be shocked at how easy it is to talk your way onto a boat with someone for a day sail. Then start asking the questions. What's it like living here, how do you empty your septic holding tanks, how do youget water, take showers, etc. They'll have all the answers and the best part is it will be tailored to that specific marina.

I agree with the folks above who said you definitely want a marina slip rather than a mooring ball, especially if someone onboard has a job to get to every morning. Keep on asking questions, and go to the library and get the how to books, or find stuff online. I suggest Don Casey's book on boat maintenance as well since you'll be doing a lot of that.

Good luck!

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post #18 of 27 Old 11-22-2011
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get into racing. enthusiastic newbies can always get rides. sit down, shut up and learn. racing is the accelerated college of sailboat handling, decision making, seeing the whole water and its traffic / breeze etc. try to get in a fleet of similar size boats as yours. volunteer for grunt work and learn boat maintenance. one full season (year) in so cal and youll be a solid coastal cruiser and confident in your abilities. there is just no substitute for learning on someone elses boat and nickle.

and remember to have fun....
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post #19 of 27 Old 11-22-2011
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Wherever you're living now....mark off an 8' x 20' space....pointed in the end 6'....and try to live in it for a week. You can only interact with whatever you can fit in that space. That's your 29' boat.

If I were going to live aboard full time, I'd have to have a 36' boat at a minimum. Preferably 38-42'. It would need heat/AC, hot water, shower, and at least 6'4" of headroom. (I'm 6'3) I'd also need a slip with power/water, wifi, laundry facilities, cable TV hookups, and marina services such as maintenance folks, mechanics, pump out boat, fuel dock, parking....

This is of course, assuming I'm not retired and out cruising the world, but have a regular full-time job. If you're independently wealthy and don't have a job, that changes things a little. You probably wouldn't be looking at a 29' boat either.

Learning to sail her is the least of your worries at this point.


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post #20 of 27 Old 11-24-2011
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Take the classes. Cost is truly minimal and you can't interact with a library card like you can with your instructor and other members of your class.
A good part of what you learn in class comes as much from questions, answers and experiences of all in the class as it does the textbook and course materials.
I'm 58 and have been boating all my life. I've taken 5 classes, the first about 15 years ago and all were well worth it.
I've also taken online classes (not in boating) and they don't begin to come close to an actual class.
I couldn't disagree more.
Example; I attended temple U in "06" for some anatomy and pedorthic related medical education and did 2/3 of the course online as did a majority of the class. there is/was an opportunity to interact w/ the other students as well as the instructors as wel as participate in group discussions.
What it DIDN'T offer was, wasted travel time,parking fees and a rigid schedule and all the usual issues that come up (professors sick,abscent,late, on vacation,etc) regardless of weather or the time of day I could "attend class" at any hour of the day or night when it was convenient to ME.
this in contrast to having to go to a location (often another city/state) and the associated costs and loss of time from work or away from family.
this is 2011 and sometimes the technical advances actually are advances !
take advantage of the advances and get an advantage. (sorry couldn't help it)

Also the classroom by design teaches to the slowest student and the "quicker" students die of boredom. like public school, the few still advocating it are largely those employed in the failed system to the detriment of those footing the bill.
happy thanksgiving.
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