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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #71  
Old 02-09-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
Hmm the great trailed line fallacy reappears. Before you rely on this try it out. I bet you will find that not many people can pull themselves back to the boat from 30 feet even with knots in the line at 5 knots never mind 8!

Try it in foulweather gear too!

FYI In a cossie when I was a fit 40 year old with higher than average upper body strength I JUST managed it at 5 knots but that was in the Caribbean, it was a thick rope with knots and it was an experiment so I was expecting it.
I guess it depends on whether you are using to haul yourself up while moving or using it to activate a deadmans switch to force the boat to round up and have something to hang on with till rounded.

Fallacy or not, mine is tested and true in 5 - 6 ft rollers and 5 kn speed.
I did the test with wife on boat to make sure I didn't send it to the States unmanned.

This summer I will try it in foul weather gear just to make sure I do have the time needed to get to the line.
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Last edited by KnottyGurl; 02-09-2012 at 10:45 AM.
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  #72  
Old 02-09-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
Hmm the great trailed line fallacy reappears. Before you rely on this try it out. I bet you will find that not many people can pull themselves back to the boat from 30 feet even with knots in the line at 5 knots never mind 8!

Try it in foulweather gear too!

FYI In a cossie when I was a fit 40 year old with higher than average upper body strength I JUST managed it at 5 knots but that was in the Caribbean, it was a thick rope with knots and it was an experiment so I was expecting it.
Maybe I'm just a young strong dude (26 & retired professional athlete), but when trying this behind my boat doing 8 knots, with no knots in the line (granted I was not in foul weather gear), it was not very difficult at all. I've even done it messing around barebacking behind powerboats, pulling myself up the waterski rope skimming on the surface while doing 30 knots. If you're in decent shape, it shouldnt be too tough behind a sailboat. Try it.
By the time I'm too old to pull this off, I'd hope I'm sailing on a much larger safer vessel with my beautiful future wife, and wouldn't be single handing anyway
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  #73  
Old 02-09-2012
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[QUOTE=JonEisberg;828832]Exactly... Outside of a handful of Navy Seals or CG Rescue swimmers, I doubt there are many of us out there capable of accomplishing such a thing, even with the adrenaline cranked up to 11... (grin)
QUOTE]

In my opinion, you shouldn't be single handing offshore in heavy weather unless you are in similar shape as a navy seal or CG rescue swimmer, or close to it. Precisely for the reason that when bad situations happen you only have YOUR OWN strength, stamina, knowledge, and resourcefulness to rely on.
And this isn't what you rely on anyway... you rely on the equipment and tactics that prevent you from going over the side in the first place. It's just a double backup to use in gnarly situations. And when single handing in those types of situations you should be using every double/triple backup you can think of.
BTW, I originally got this trailing line technique from one of Hal Roth's books, the dude who's got salt running through his veins and gnarliness growing in his back hairs!
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  #74  
Old 02-09-2012
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I usually go from Carolina to Florida in a series of overnight hops. I have done two nights a couple of times, but try to avoid it. I plan it for a by noon arrival, so that I have the maximum time for rest, before heading out the next day.

I did have crew, Texas to Florida, but I find I stay more alert taking a couple of 15-20 min catnaps, than waking up in the middle of the night for my watch turn. I stay fairly close to shore (mile or two off) and plan my naps for areas outside of major inlets and shipping lanes. And since I use a masthead running light offshore, I also turn on the deck level lights when napping. Maybe not the best way, but it has worked for me. I consider the odds of an encounter with another boat that is not on watch to be too minimal, for anything other than destined.
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  #75  
Old 02-09-2012
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I sail solo maybe 75-80% of the time.

I have a nice boat, so I assume it is my personality.

On the lake it was no big deal, just wear a PFD at night.

I'll be on the ocean this year so I'm stepping up:
- Buying an auto inflating PFD with harness
- Leading my main halyard to the cockpit
- Reading SailNet articles

I'll have Zoe the wonder pooch with me, so that should help!
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  #76  
Old 02-09-2012
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Sailing Solo and Insurance

I have not yet purchased my boat, but as one whoe does many things solo (climbing, backcounty skiing, cycling) I look forward to my solo sailing adventures. My question is how is a solo sailor convered by insurance either along the coastal US or in the Bahamas or Caribbean?

Thanks!
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Originally Posted by Telesailor View Post
I have not yet purchased my boat, but as one whoe does many things solo (climbing, backcounty skiing, cycling) I look forward to my solo sailing adventures. My question is how is a solo sailor convered by insurance either along the coastal US or in the Bahamas or Caribbean?

Thanks!
HAHA! I dig your user name, TELESAILOR! best of both worlds...
I've never had an ansurance company ask or care whether I was sailing solo or with crew. I don't think it matters. What matters is your experience, credentials, track record, vessel, and waters you'll be sailing.
I'm also a backcountry skier! Fun stuff in all seasons!
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  #78  
Old 02-09-2012
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Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
I'm going to simplify my rig by doing away with the port and starboard jacklines in favor of one taut center jackline from dodger to mast and one from mast to bow cleat, installing more padeyes at critical points such as getting past the dodger. That is the most tenuous spot so am going to install one permanent, short tether to a center padeye just forward of dodger to secure the balancing act around it. The first line of defense is NOT going over in the first place because all bets are off once you're in the water.
I just want to add, although it's been mentioned before, that having a waterproof handheld in your pocket (or a personal epirb) is just as important as a PFD.

Even a waterproof cell phone case could save your life. I coastal cruise New England from NY to Newport and always have a signal.

1. Stay on the boat.
2. Have a way to get back on the boat.
3. Have a way to call for help.

Wave your arms at a passing freighter or swim for it are not on my list.
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  #79  
Old 02-09-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shartel View Post

In my opinion, you shouldn't be single handing offshore in heavy weather unless you are in similar shape as a navy seal or CG rescue swimmer, or close to it. Precisely for the reason that when bad situations happen you only have YOUR OWN strength, stamina, knowledge, and resourcefulness to rely on.
Damn, guess that disqualifies me from any further ventures offshore, then... (grin)

Ahh, well - I try to make up for my physical limitations by sailing an appropriately-sized boat... (except when I'm being paid to do otherwise, that is)

Quote:
Originally Posted by shartel View Post

BTW, I originally got this trailing line technique from one of Hal Roth's books, the dude who's got salt running through his veins and gnarliness growing in his back hairs!
Sadly, for Hal, that would be "used to have salt running through his veins..."

I've had the distinct pleasure and great honor to have met Hal and Margaret, although it was somewhat awkward, as the top of his head drew about even with my chest (grin) While still appearing quite fit, he still looked a few decades removed from having ever met the physical requirements you outline above for sailing offshore...

Of course, I certainly agree with your basic premise. Physical fitness is a hugely important aspect of sailing offshore... I'm simply appalled at the extent to which I see so many Mom & Pop cruisers "over-boated" today, out there in boats WAY beyond their ability to deal with when the breeze comes up, and things like electric winches or windlasses start crapping out... Lots of folks out there, rolling the dice in that regard, bigtime...

Many today could do well to take a cue from Hal and Margaret, who never cruised in anything larger than 35', if memory serves...
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Old 02-09-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telesailor View Post
I have not yet purchased my boat, but as one whoe does many things solo (climbing, backcounty skiing, cycling) I look forward to my solo sailing adventures. My question is how is a solo sailor convered by insurance either along the coastal US or in the Bahamas or Caribbean?

Thanks!
I resort to "Don't ask, Don't tell".
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