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  #61  
Old 07-28-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

Yup nice bit of TIC welding there. Not often one sees that on a home made bit of kit.
More often then not I tend to look up when seeing "home job welding" and try to find the pidgeon that done it in the spreaders.

ATB

Michael
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  #62  
Old 07-28-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

The projects that were the most difficult were often the most easily overlooked ones, and a lot of the "pretty" stuff (like the bracket) weren't all that difficult at all.

Take the toe rail for example, that was very difficult. Very few oohs and ahs about that upon completion, as it was just a simple "off the rack" 34' (x2) length of toe rail. Think about it however, how exactly do you install it and bed it with butyl?

1- Start with a filled and faired hull to deck joint (a big project in and of itself)
2- Place forward portion of the rail where it's to go, place wife on shoddy ladder 20' out and 10' feet up from aft of boat to hold the straight length of rail as you drill the first hole and temp. drop first fastener into the hole to hold the rail on.
3- Have wife balance the rail on the ladder (careful there), move ladder in a bit, then climb back up and pull the rail in for the next hole and fastener to be repeated as the first.
4- Repeat, over and over until the last fastener is in (gets much harder as you proceed, as the rail gets more and more "bent on" and the pressure to bend it on needs to greatly increase. The fact that the rail was 4' longer than the boat greatly helped in achieving the leverage needed to bend it on). We couldn't have bent it on had we cut it to the proper length beforehand.
5- Now the rail is on, unbedded and with drill shavings piled up underneath it.
6- Next, remove temporary short fasteners holding the rail on in favor of long fasteners, one by one.
7- Realize at this point that the long fasteners - which are needed to give the ability to lift the rail high enough to clean the shavings and apply the butyl - won't fit in many areas because they are so close to the edge.
8- Custom fit each fastener to work. Some need trimming, some need a slight bend applied to them. There are many. So many..
9- Remove certain fasteners that won't facilitate lifting the rail (better not remove too many though).
10- Carefully and gently pry/lift rail as high as possible without removing it. We were able to lift about 3".
11- Clean shavings, do any spot prep that became necessary.
12- Apply butyl. Do a long unbroken line the entire length of the rail, inside and out, and do a circle around each and every fastener.
13- Gently tap rail back down the entire length.
14- Send wife inside to crank down as you hold fast up top.
15- Test for leaks, leave to settle for a couple of days and give the butyl time to ooze.
16- Give everything a final crankdown and wait again for ooze. Trim ooze.
17 - Trim off overhanging aft part of toe rail to proper length.
18- Smack head and wonder why you didn't just build a bulwark out of epoxy to begin with.


The rail was incredibly difficult, one of the most difficult, and once installed only noticeable in it's beauty to those who have any idea what it takes to install something like that.









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Old 07-28-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

For anyone reading this old thread who doesn't know, I am no longer a believer in motorless/purist nonsense and I cringe when I read my own insanity about what we wanted. When we were doing the boat I was obsessed with this vision of lunacy fueled by reading books I should have never picked up, as well as my experiences locally with sailing and not using the diesel - and my own orneriness about proving I can do what others say I cannot do. I still like the notion of a sail only vessel (I always will in some way), but what I really like I later came to realize was building neat stuff that looks good, which does not typically run parallel with practicality. She basically became a useless work of art, a "theory" boat that had no real value (financially or otherwise) .

We should have left the motor, simply done a work boat finish over a few months time, and had at it. Instead I viewed the boat as art and lore, and proceeded as such. Really stupid, and even though it was a great experience I cannot recommend it to anyone who wants sanity in their lives. Keep your motor, and don't refit something you have to re tie every 4 hours so it won't scrape a piling and scratch your hard, wasted work all up.

Points to consider:

1- No motor/anemic o/b makes it very difficult, and yes, somewhat dangerous (although the latter can be debated - but not by me as I don't care anymore). Dropping the o/b on the bracket every time I needed motor assist was wasted time. The "challenge" gets old very quick.
2- Composting heads are gross, and not really composting heads. They are simply poop/pee separators and poop dryers. No composting takes place in a lived in boat. There simply isn't enough time.
3- Beauty takes maintenance, lots and lots of maintenance.
4- Wood stoves are sooty and dirty (but do keep a dry boat).
5- Mahogany is soft. Varnish is a pain.
6- Hank on's just "work", and so will you if you have them instead of a furler.
7- Alcohol is a lousy cooking fuel, and oil lamps leak all over the place and cannot be seen externally very well at all. They also make you go blind from the dim lighting inside.
8- Having foot pump only water gets old, maybe less so for the drummers out there, but for me it got old (and I do actually play the drums).
9 - A pure sailing craft offers the least pleasure to work ratio.
10- It isn't what it appears, as written by those who make cruising cash by selling books.
11- People who cannot do things unless they take it all the way should not refit old boats while reading Jay Fitzgerald, the Pardeys, etc.

We haven't owned a boat for a long time now, and other than learning/honing my fabrication skills (which was actually the biggest pleasure out of this whole thing), the whole affair was basically a huge waste of time. Just go sailing and don't ruin it for yourself, even though good arguments can be made that counter everything I just wrote above.
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  #64  
Old 07-29-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

I'm impressed. Precious few are willing to come back later and admit that maybe their grand, unconventional plans turned out to be a bit of "insanity." Takes a big man to make that sort of admission and my hat is off to you.

Let's hope that others will read this and realize that sometimes the unconventional is unconventional for a very good reason--because the conventions WORK!
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Old 07-29-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

I see that this is an old thread that's just been revived. A couple of people mentioned having a similar mount on their boats. I think what they had was a Garelick 71053.
Works like yours does but it's not as pretty.

ADAPTER PLATE FOR ALUMINUM MOTOR BRACKETS - Garelick Eez-In
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: The final solution - what I came up with regarding auxiliary propulsion (pic heav

Had to chuckle over your method of bending the toe rail . Did a similar job on Thane, (with ropes+tackle at the dock) pulling 20 ft 2x4.s on the flat around my modified Spray for bulwarks. (6 times around) Glue and nailed with bolts thru before cap. I was also a broke purist (engineless) for a while. Finally got a job to rectify the situation.
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